Are you the publisher? Claim or contact us about this channel


Embed this content in your HTML

Search

Report adult content:

click to rate:

Account: (login)

More Channels


Showcase


Channel Catalog


Channel Description:

Celebrity news and blog articles from The Huffington Post

older | 1 | .... | 719 | 720 | (Page 721) | 722 | 723 | .... | 764 | newer

    0 0


    Because I don’t want you to die, I want to warn you away from the “True Detective” drinking games that the kids have been going wild for lately.


    Here's how to avoid said drinking games, unless you have a death wish:



    • Don't drink every time an actor struggles with an overwritten line of dialogue. (“It’s like blue balls in your heart.”)

    • Don't drink every time you watch Taylor Kitsch or Vince Vaughn battle mightily to master roles that, for the most part, do not play to their strengths in a consistent way. Definitely don’t imbibe every time you think Vince Vaughn sounds like he’s appearing in a dinner-theater production of “Guys and Dolls.”

    • Don't drink every time you think the character development is lacking, sloppy or incomplete. Why was coming out, even a little, so difficult for Paul Woodrugh (Kitsch)? Why was embracing that side of himself so challenging for this particular man? No idea. And if the answer is because he’s got a shrewish, emasculating mother, then creator Nic Pizzolatto has got to stop getting his story ideas from psychology textbooks published decades ago.

    • Don't drink when you can’t fully enjoy a set piece, like that massive gun battle, because it fundamentally made no sense. Yes, now we know why it made no sense (sort of?), but it would have been nice at the time not to wonder why a bunch of random gang members suddenly decided to act very stupidly.

    • Don't drink when you wonder whether the entire resolution of the season will amount, more or less, to “a wizard did it,” with James Frain’s barely-seen Burris as the convenient wizard. How did Burris know where Woodrugh would emerge from the tunnels? Because he’s a wizard! Has he been pulling all the strings the whole time? Yes, because ... wizard stuff! Who was the African-American man Woodrugh met in the tunnels? Another wizard! All right, IMDb.com tells me it was Holloway, the police chief, but I highly doubt that was the first guess of anyone in North America. Forget Holloway and Burris -- raise your hand if you’ve spent exposition-dump scenes wondering who the hell Geldof and Tasha and Lutz are. But for your own mental and physical health, don’t drink when character names ring zero bells -- just move on.

    • Don't drink when you start thinking about how the repetitive overhead shots of Los Angeles’ highways are a metaphor for the convoluted bowl of spaghetti that is the plot. But wait, bowls of spaghetti and highways are not the same thing, maybe “True Detective” is a lasagna of obfuscation and imitation? But wait, maybe a better metaphor is a stew of undercooked MacGuffins swimming in a broth of “gritty”clichés? You will really, really want to drink when all these metaphors start colliding in your head (and you might get hungry), but don’t start pouring shots, because you need your head clear to figure out what that singer is wailing about (not even this hilarious "True D" plot explainer has any idea what the singer's deal is). 

    • Don't drink when an individual episode feels as though it lasts for several days (I don’t know about you, but Episode 5 alone aged me by three years). Definitely don't go near alcohol when you wonder why no well-compensated HBO executive effectively reigned in Pizzolatto’s tendency to write clunky dialogue, march his poor actors through unforgiving exposition deluges and festoon what could have been a decent six- or eight-episode season with way too many barnacles, curlicues and extraneous doodads. But maybe I’m an outlier on this: I’ve been at the Television Critics Association press tour for a week, and my desire to drink has increased every time I’ve heard an executive at HBO, Amazon, Netflix or some other deep-pocketed content factory proudly declare that they don’t tell their amazingly talented creators what to do, ever, because creators are creative and anyone who is creative must always be right! Uhh, what? I’m all for creative people being allowed to shape their stories and employ their craft in intelligent and evocative ways, but what is the point of executives at places like that if they don’t make the storytelling better, or at least stop it from turning into an expensive, reeking mess?

    • Ah, the hell with it, pour me a drink.


    No, wait, I promised myself I would not drink when watching, thinking or writing about “True Detective”; that way lies madness and possible death. And yet I must confess that I am nevertheless addicted: I can’t stop watching it, because, as train wrecks go, much of Season 2 was a gift that did not stop giving.


     As the sophomore season got off to a hilariously awkward start, Pizzolatto attempted to give us five or six different shows ineptly smushed in one, and most of the grafts were either rejected or took a long time to take. It was fitting that Season 2 began with the rotting, propped-up body of a dead man, because the central plot was a Frankenstein’s monster, a stitched-together creation that smelled more ripe as time went on. 


    As others have noted, for all its vaulting aesthetics and thematic ambition, Season 1’s saving grace was that it concentrated on only a few elements. There were linked murder investigations in the past and present, and the narrative through line -- which remained strong even when everything else wobbled -- was the complicated friendship of the two cops involved in those cases. Keeping the whole thing coherent were the masterful performances of Woody Harrelson and Matthew McConaughey and the sure, supple direction of Cary Joji Fukunaga, who infused long stretches of Season 1 with an air of wounded, graceful lyricism.


    In retrospect, it’s more obvious how crucial the performance of McConaughey was; he had a sparkle in his eye that said, “Hey, maybe Rust Cohle is full of it, but at least he's an entertaining bullsh*t artist, am I right?” Both Harrelson and McConaughey had sly sides to their performances, and their ability to be both serious and to use subtle comic shadings to subvert Pizzolatto’s tendency toward preposterous faux-erudition ended up improving and elevating Season 1, which wasn’t too overwhelmed by inelegant detours and misguided deviations until it hit the home stretch.


    This time around, it appears that Pizzolatto’s goal was to triple down on every mistake he made in Season 1, which may account for my weird fixation with this year's model: Soaring, unchecked arrogance can be a spectacle in its own right. Part of me knew what I'd be getting: Pizzolatto has never been known for subtlety, after all. Vinci is the most corrupt town! Ray Velcoro is the most tortured detective! This sex party has the most random boobs! These people employ even more sex workers than “Game of Thrones”! Take that, Westeros! 


    A tendency toward maximalism isn’t necessarily a bad thing. Film director George Miller has a similar urge toward energetic saturation, but the difference is, his characters are clearly delineated and his world-building ferociously complete and joyfully imaginative. But this season of the HBO show has hardly been “True Detective: Fury Road,” and more’s the pity. It’s been, for the most part, a series of grim, humorless attempts to crib from various kinds of noir, to shove 15 pounds of plot into a shoddily made 10-pound bag and to come up with something that could eventually incubate its own organic narrative drive. 


    And that didn’t happen consistently until Episode 7.


    Finally, the “Serpico” homage that Colin Farrell had been starring in steered decisively away from his painfully uninteresting family drama and gave the actor a chance to simply brood and throw off waves of charisma, which he did effortlessly. The reasonably straightforward cop procedural that Rachel McAdams has been appearing in also came into focus, and kudos to McAdams being light on her feet and exceedingly savvy as she skillfully navigated Season 2’s iffy construction. Like Harrelson and McConaughey, both of these actors are magnetic and able to underplay and elevate the sometimes overwrought material they’re given, and when Velcoro and Bezzerides interacted in Episode 7, they and director Dan Attias managed to recreate some of the old magic. (By the way, it’s gross and immature that Pizzolatto went out of his way to mock Fukunaga this season, given that it’s even more obvious now how much the show has suffered in his absence.)


    Not having one director for the season was a mistake, but Season 2 labored under the cloud of a much bigger one. The lead weight pulling the whole thing under has been Frank Semyon (Vaughn); the storylines set at his home and workplace were often among the most painfully inept minutes of television HBO has aired in recent memory. Vaughn was miscast and Kelly Reilly has been criminally underused as his wife, and very few things this season were more poorly handled than their sodden, circular conversations about having a child. Sidebar: I could write a whole "True Detective" piece about its nagging wives, cartoonish mothers and women largely defined by the assaults they've endured. In Season 2, there are exponentially more of them than there were in Season 1. (Take that, critics!) But … ehnnnn. Not rising to the bait today. 


    The season hasn’t been a complete train wreck, and that’s half the reason I couldn’t look away. It was hard not to love the DGAF characters played by W. Earl Brown and Richie Coster, who gleefully stole scenes from under their more famous co-stars just by having fun with this mishmash of “Chinatown” and every pulp detective novel ever set west of the Rockies. The scene of Velcoro getting shot by the masked man and the visits to the office of Rick Springfield, Creepy Plastic Surgeon, were suitably freaky and purplishly entertaining, and I’m OK with any scene that involves Rachel McAdams getting very stabby. 


    But for long stretches, the show itself reminded me of Ani Bezzerides’ e-cigarette; a little douchey, full of artificial ingredients, not good for you and faintly ridiculous. And then, finally, the second half of the seventh episode made everything that came before it almost worth the pain. 


    The scene of Velcoro and Bezzerides staring at each other with wounded, vulnerable eyes was hypnotic, and, in Vinci, Vaughn finally, finally locked into a new gear. He was masterful at playing a suddenly conciliatory Frank, who hid an ocean of rage underneath a bland, dead-eyed smile. The plot finally lurched forward, and most of the shaggiest and extraneous elements of Season 2 were burned down like Frank’s club and casino, to be missed by no one.


    For long stretches, the seventh episode of “True Detective” was almost dialogue-free, proving again that when it's working, the show is a canny combination of minimalist dialogue and saturated atmosphere. What worked in that episode -- and elsewhere in the season -- derived from unpredictable alchemy created by actors and evocative moments handled gracefully by directors. In last Sunday's episode, what I loved about “True Detective’s” first season -- the quiet atmosphere of sad rage and frustration and the air of vulnerable, doomed romance -- at long last crept back to center stage.


    So what will “True Detective” sift from the ashes when it finally wraps up Season 2? Who knows, but I have a feeling that Season 3, which is probably inevitable, will serve as another object lesson in the dangers of unchecked hubris, because Pizzolatto doesn't strike me as the kind of guy who is likely to get out of his own way. “We get the world we deserve,” eh? Critics have been pretty hard on Season 2. What kind of harsh lesson will we deserve in Season 3?


    If Stan knows, he’s not telling.


    Ryan McGee and I discussed "True Detective" and "UnREAL" in the the latest Talking TV podcast, which is here, on iTunes and below. 


     


     


     




    Also on HuffPost:



    For a constant stream of entertainment news and discussion, follow HuffPost Entertainment on Viber.

    -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.












    0 0




    Hollywood star and lifestyle guru Gwyneth Paltrow is set to appear alongside Sen. Jon Tester (D-Mont.) Wednesday to discuss the need for GMO labeling.

     

    We applaud Paltrow for her willingness to get involved in the political process, and think that all Americans should participate as much as they can in putting pressure on their local politicians to legislate change.



     



    But while labels for genetically modified foods might seem sensible — or at the very least, harmless — the issue obscures some very important facts about the GMO debate. 

     

    The scientific community agrees: Genetically modified foods are not harmful to human health.

    When it comes to scientific consensus on GMO foods, it’s not even close. In January, a Pew poll surveyed both the general public and scientists from the American Association for the Advancement of Science and found that 88 percent of scientists thought GMOs were “generally safe.” To put that in perspective, only 87 percent of scientists in the poll agreed that human activity is causing climate change. 

     

    Why do most scientists think this way? Because time and again, scientific research on the safety of genetically modified foods has proven them safe to eat. The American Medical Association states that there is “no scientific justification for special labeling of bioengineered foods” and that “voluntary labeling is without value unless it is accompanied by focused consumer education.” The aforementioned AAAS has also announced their support for GMO foods, warning that labels could “mislead and falsely alarm consumers.” Add to that list of supporters the World Health Organization and the U.S. National Academy of Sciences -- all independent, non-corporate organizations. 

     

    That message has not gotten to the public: In the same poll, 57 percent of the American public thought GMOs were “generally unsafe.”

     

    Human beings have been genetically modifying food for millennia.  

    In their 2013 editorial against GMO labeling, the magazine Scientific American compares ancient agricultural methods like breeding to the genetic splicing that creates disease-resistant crops:

     


    We have been tinkering with our food's DNA since the dawn of agriculture. By selectively breeding plants and animals with the most desirable traits, our predecessors transformed organisms' genomes, turning a scraggly grass into plump-kerneled corn, for example. For the past 20 years Americans have been eating plants in which scientists have used modern tools to insert a gene here or tweak a gene there, helping the crops tolerate drought and resist herbicides. Around 70 percent of processed foods in the U.S. contain genetically modified ingredients.


     

    Genetically engineered foods hold a great deal of promise for poor communities.

    You’ve probably heard of “golden rice,” a genetically modified food enriched with Vitamin A. It was created for poor communities in Southeast Asia and Africa, where the primary food staple is rice, but children are going blind for lack of essential nutrients like vitamin A.

     

    In April, the The White House Office of Science and Technology Policy and the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office awarded the creators of golden rice with the Patents for Humanity Award, which recognizes private sector researchers for their contribution to global health.  

     

    But as William Saletan of Slate notes in his year-long investigation on the safety of GMOs, golden rice still isn’t commercially available, even though it was invented 16 years ago. Saletan attributes this delay to a ferocious anti-GMO movement spearheaded by Greenpeace. From Slate:

     


    Two years ago anti-GMO activists destroyed a field trial of the rice in the Philippines. Last year they filed a petition to block all field tests and feeding studies. Greenpeace boasted, “After more than 10 years of research ‘Golden’ Rice is nowhere near its promise to address Vitamin A Deficiency.” And a million more kids are dead.


     

    Consumers already have a label for non-GMO foods. 

    GMOs are in the majority of America’s food supply. An estimated 95 percent of sugar beets, 94 percent of soybeans, 90 percent of cotton and 88 percent of feed corn are genetically engineered, reports USA Today.

     

    But foods that label themselves “organic” have to comply with non-GMO rules, and so anyone who is concerned about avoiding them need only to steer himself toward the organic sections of the supermarket. 

     

    We'll stick with the scientists on this issue. Wouldn't it be nice if the celebrities and politicians with the privilege of a large platform could do the same? 

     

     

    Also on HuffPost: 


    -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.












    0 0


    Yup, Sony is officially remaking "Jumanji" -- and it's your 2016 Christmas present. If you're of the anti-remake mindset, that news may make you as angry as a troop of monkeys destroying a kitchen. But then again, it's hard to deny that the 1995 fantasy movie could benefit from some better CGI in the remake.


    On Wednesday, Sony Pictures released its film slate through 2019 with release dates for 16 new films, including the new "Jumanji," "Bad Boys 3" and "4," and a new date for Paul Feig's "Ghostbusters." News of a "Jumanji" remake first broke in 2012 when Sony announced plans to update the Robin Williams fantasy film for the present. Now you can expect to see a modern revamp of the movie on Christmas Day in 2016 -- here's to hoping they release an updated version of the board game as well. Check out the full slate of release dates below, via Variety.


    “Money Monster” -- April 8, 2016
    “The Shallows” -- June 24, 2016
    “Ghostbusters” -- July 15, 2016 
    “Patient Zero” -- Sept. 2, 2016
    “The Magnificent Seven” -- Sept. 23, 2016
    “Underworld 5" -- Oct. 21, 2016 
    “Passengers” -- Dec. 21, 2016
    “Jumanji” -- Dec. 25, 2016 
    “The Dark Tower” -- Jan. 13, 2017 
    “Resident Evil 6" -- Jan. 27, 2017 
    “Bad Boys 3″" -- Feb. 17, 2017
    “Baby Driver” -- Mar. 17, 2017
    “Barbie” -- June 2, 2017
    “Uncharted” -- June 30, 2017 
    “The Lamb” -- Dec. 8, 2017
    “Bad Boys 4″ -- July 3, 2019


    For more, head to Variety.


    Also on HuffPost:



    For a constant stream of entertainment news and discussion, follow HuffPost Entertainment on Viber.

    -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.












    0 0

    Khloe Kardashian is following in her sister Kim's footsteps and dipping her toes in the world of tech with a new app. 


    The "Keeping  Up with the Kardashians" star has partnered with recent Cornell grad Lindsey Cummins to launch Begroupd, a messaging app with decision-making tools integrated directly into the chat stream: yes/no questions, rating functionality, RSVPs and polls. It's the first and only app that has this feature, because it's 2015 and we need our apps to make decisions for us. (It is free, though.)


    The 31-year-old reality star shared an Instagram snap Wednesday promoting the app, with the caption "My loves, download group messaging app @begroupd and vote on my poll! iPhone users get it free through link in my bio. Can’t wait to hear what you guys think!"



    A photo posted by Khloé (@khloekardashian) on



    "Even though group chat solved one problem, it created another," Cummins said in a press release. "Group messaging is where you make plans and decisions, but there is nothing out there that helps you organize those parts of the conversations ... that's where Begroupd comes in." 


    "Everyone knows that feeling of being in a group chat with multiple conversations that are all over the place," Kardashian added. "What I loved about Begroupd is that it sorts through the chaos and saves time by streamlining the decision-making process." 


    Koko can even send polls to everyone on the app so they can feel extra connected to her. 


    About three months ago, the Complex cover girl teased the app with a photo on Instagram, and back in April, she hosted a preview party for it during the Coachella music festival. (You might remember it as that time sister Kylie Jenner wore a mesh bodysuit to a pool party.) 


    Begroupd is now available in the app store for iOS. 


    Also on HuffPost: 



    For a constant stream of entertainment news and discussion, follow HuffPost Entertainment on Viber.

    -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.












    0 0


    They may have signed their divorce docs recently, but it sounds as if Khloe Kardashian will always have love for ex Lamar Odom. 


    In the September issue of Women's Health, the "Keeping Up with the Kardashian" star opens up the her feelings for the basketball player and what went wrong in their marriage.


    “I love Lamar to death," she said. "He is the love of my life. We had a fantastic marriage. Do I wish he had tried harder? Yes. Do I think that he maybe didn’t have the energy to fight because he was fighting so many other things? Yeah.”


    The reality star filed for divorce in December 2013, a little more than four years after the couple tied the knot, but the proceedings had been stalled since. Late last month, People confirmed that the exes had both finally signed their divorce docs. 


    Kardashian's candid comments about the divorce echo what she told E! Online about her ex back in April. 


    "I will never, ever not love Lamar," the 31-year-old admitted. "I was so obsessed with him in a healthy way. He was my husband, and I still wish he was, and I don't think there's anything wrong with that."



    More recently, Kardashian seems to have moved on with another basketball star, Houston Rockets shooting guard James Harden. And from what she told Women's Health, it seems he has some of the traits she's looking for in a boyfriend. 


    "People that can make you laugh, that’s the best," she told the mag. "Anything else can come and go. Obviously you have to be physically attracted in some way.  Normally I’m a muscle girl. You have to be athletic, not an athlete. I like athletes, but you have to be athletic because I’m an athletic person." 


    Also on HuffPost: 



    Keep in touch! Check out HuffPost Divorce on Facebook.


     

    -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.












    0 0


    Kelly Osbourne may not want to be involved in the political immigration debate, but it's a bit too late for that.


    While attempting to insult Donald Trump during her appearance on "The View" as a guest host on Tuesday, Osbourne failed miserably and instead blurted out a racist comment: "If you kick every Latino out of this country, then who is going to be cleaning your toilet, Donald Trump?" Not good. A few moments later, the 30-year-old explained that she "didn't mean it like that." And in an interview with Extra on Wednesday, Osbourne acknowledged that her initial comment was wrong. "If I saw that clip just with the ten seconds, I’d hate me too," she told the news program.




    "I’m not OK that I hurt people’s feelings," she continued. "It was my poor choice of words and it doesn’t reflect my opinion at all, and I do not want to be brought into this political nightmare." While Osbourne said she didn't understand how her comment got so much attention, she told Extra that she doesn't want "The View" co-host Rosie Perez -- who apologized to Osbourne after admittedly misunderstanding her point -- taking the blame for it. "It came out of my mouth, I own it, and I will do whatever I have to do to make it right."


    Shortly after Osbourne appeared on "The View," she issued a statement in which she said she was not "a racist" and that she "whole-hearted f**ked up." However, a lot of people considered the statement a non-apology. Latinos took to Twitter to express their frustration with Osbourne's words with the hashtag #QueridaKellyObsourne, which quickly went viral.


    For more, head to Extra.


    Also on HuffPost:



    For a constant stream of entertainment news and discussion, follow HuffPost Entertainment on Viber.

    -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.












    0 0


     TLC took its sweet time before they decided to cancel "19 Kids and Counting" when Josh Duggar apologized following reports that, as a teenager, he allegedly molested five underage girls, including some of his sisters. 


    Duggar's confession came in May, but the network didn't officially cancel the reality series until July. As the network's highest-rated show, no doubt finances were a concern. The Wrap reports that TLC's parent company, Discovery Communications, lost about $19 million when they said goodbye to the Duggar family.


    During a post-earnings conference call on Wednesday, the company's Chief Financial Officer Andrew Warren revealed Discovery had lost a total of $24 million during the second quarter, listing "higher restructuring and other charges this year of $19 million, primarily due to content impairment charges of canceling TLC’s '19 Kids and Counting,'" as the reason. 


    Still, TLC hasn't completely cut ties with the Duggars. At the same time that it  announced the series' cancelation, it also revealed their new partnership with child-protection organizations, Darkness to Light and RAINN (Rape, Abuse and Incest National Network), as part of a new campaign to raise awareness about child sexual abuse. 


    "TLC will work closely with both groups and with the Duggar family on a one-hour documentary that will include Jill and Jessa and other survivors and families that have been affected by abuse," the network said in its statement. 


     


    Also on HuffPost:  



    For a constant stream of entertainment news and discussion, follow HuffPost Entertainment on Viber.

    -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.












    0 0



    It's been a rough summer for celebrity couples, with many -- including Jennifer Garner and Ben AffleckGwen Stefani and Gavin Rossdale and even Kermit and Miss Piggy -- calling it quits. And while it's sad to watch our favorite Hollywood pairings un-tie the knot, marriage expert Fawn Weaver says most celebrity couples are doomed from the start. 


    As the Argument-Free Marriage author explained in a HuffPost Live interview on Tuesday:



    The problem with celebrity marriages is that they're not built to last. It's very difficult to stand up against the spotlight in that manner, so we're looking at these guys -- we put them on these pedestals so they feel as though they have be fake all of the time and they have to go over the top, and that's hard to do. They're not able to really deal with their stuff.



    Weaver, the founder of The Happy Wives Club, urges quarreling couples to slow down in their approach to problem solving.


     "When you feel your emotions accelerating, immediately decelerate them," she said. 


     Watch more from Fawn Weaver's conversation with HuffPost Live here.


    Sign up here for Live Today, HuffPost Live's new morning email that will let you know the newsmakers, celebrities and politicians joining us that day and give you the best clips from the day before!


     Also on HuffPost:


    -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.












    0 0


     


    Following the release of his cover story, Miles Teller tweeted at Esquire, calling the article "misrepresenting." 


     

    -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.












    0 0

    Taylor Swift was not pleased when an overzealous fan grabbed her leg and almost pulled her off stage during a recent stop on her "1989" World Tour. 


    The superstar singer was in the middle of a performance of "Bad Blood" at Rexall Place in Edmonton, Alberta, Tuesday when two concertgoers jumped up and grabbed her leg. A video taken by another attendee shows Swift was able to pull away quickly enough and continue the show. 



    A second video from the incident shows two men in white T-shirts rushing the stage before being apprehended by security. 




    Despite the scary moment, Swift posted an Instagram thanking the crowd in Edmonton that night. 



    Thanks Edmonton-- tonight was insanely fun and I can't wait to be back on your stage tomorrow night!

    A photo posted by Taylor Swift (@taylorswift) on



     Also on HuffPost: 



    For a constant stream of entertainment news and discussion, follow HuffPost Entertainment on Viber.

    -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.












    0 0



    Today we know Shrek as the giant ogre voiced by Mike Myers. What many don't know, however, is that Chris Farley was originally cast to voice the animated character and nearly completed his work on the film before his death.


    Before Farley died from an overdose in December of 1997, the "Saturday Night Live" actor had already recorded much of Shrek's dialogue. "He did 99 percent of the film and then passed away," Chris Farley's brother, Kevin Farley, recently told Yahoo in an interview. The original Shrek, which was created with Farley in mind, was also envisioned as much different than the Shrek Myers played. According to blogger Jim Hill, Farley's Shrek was a young ogre who didn't want to scare people, but instead dreamed of becoming a knight. "Originally the Shrek character was a little bit more like Chris," the "SNL" star's brother told Yahoo, "like a humble, bumbling innocent guy." 


    Now we can finally hear what Farley's bumbling Shrek would have been like, thanks to a leaked story reel of the late comedian voicing the character. The video, which was originally posted to Vimeo in 2013 by film producer John Garbett, a Development Producer for DreamWorks on the original "Shrek," shows storyboard sketches accompanied by Farley and Eddie Murphy's voicework. The video was uploaded to YouTube on Tuesday and has since caught Reddit's attention. Farley's voice work reveals a different type of ogre: a sensitive, heartfelt Shrek that we wish we could've met on the big screen.


    Also on HuffPost:



    For a constant stream of entertainment news and discussion, follow HuffPost Entertainment on Viber.

    -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.












    0 0

    Celebrity Twitter and Instagram feuds are a dime a dozen these days. We've seen Katy Perry face off against Taylor Swift, Khloe Kardashian slam Amber Rose, and of course, Blac Chyna, a grown woman, tease and taunt her ex-man Tyga and his reported girlfriend (emphasis on the girl), Kylie Jenner. 


    In today's news, the 27-year-old model posted a photo on Instagram of herself clad in a sexy red bikini while lounging in the sun. Seems normal enough. But the mother of Tyga's child captioned the pic, "I know u Miss me," complete with a lipstick kiss emoji. 


    Now, her words could be directed at anyone, but many are taking the caption as a sign she's still got Tyga on her mind. Or she just wants to mess with him (and us).


    Either way, the photo exists and you can make of it what you will.



    After sharing that racy photo, Blac Chyna posted a second pic, which may or may not be a shot at Jenner. In the snap, the model poses in the same bikini while holding up a detox drink (which she's promoting in the caption). The photo came just after the youngest member of the Kardashian-Jenner family posted a similar photo promoting her favorite tea



    This apparent feud between Kylie and Blac Chyna started back in March when the latter shared a photo of her diamond encrusted watch -- a gift from Tyga. Kylie's rebuttle was to post a photo of herself wearing an almost identical watch just shortly after, with the caption, "currently." More Instagram shade was thrown (along with a possible Twitter threat) over the past couple months, and now, here we are. 


    Does anyone else find it weird that a 27-year-old woman is still in the middle of a petty fued with a teenager?


    Also on HuffPost:



    For a constant stream of entertainment news and discussion, follow HuffPost Entertainment on Viber.

    -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.












    0 0

    Former Disney star Amy Bruckner has been to the future. That's a fact. But even she probably couldn't have predicted the path she'd take after her sitcom days.


    Bruckner, who starred as Pim Diffy in "Phil of the Future," recently told The Huffington Post that after her Disney days and some movie roles, she actually left acting for around six years, studied human rights and feminist theory at NYU and eventually went backpacking through Europe. There, she wound up at a bar in Germany called "The Sharon Stonewall" and had an epiphany while watching behind-the-scenes footage of a Pink concert -- acting was what she wanted to do. (Aka, your typical child actor story.) Now she's back, but don't be surprised if you don't recognize her. 


    Here's Bruckner as she appeared on Disney:



    And here she is now:



    A photo posted by amy bruckner (@ameliabruckner) on



     


    The actress told HuffPost even people she knows can't really place her face nowadays. And she means for real, not like those times when you pretend you don't know someone from high school so you don't have to talk to them. (Walmart shoppers know what I'm talking about.)


    "I do look a lot different than I did as a 13-year-old. I'm no longer perfectly spherical like I was on the show," the actress said. "I think that throws people off, but I mean people who knew me when I was a kid [in Los Angeles] don’t recognize me when I see them." 



    Despite that, Bruckner said she does still get some fans who make the connection from "weird things," like recognizing a "substantial" birthmark on her arm or hearing the sound of her voice, which Disney fans might be able to pick up on when she says stuff like this:



    A video posted by amy bruckner (@ameliabruckner) on



    Ah, Pim. You'll never change.


    Bruckner's Disney character wasn't a typical junior high kid. For one, she was known for her evil plots (which, yeah, sounds like a normal teenage girl, but stay with us). She also had an atypical upbringing full of futuristic gadgets and gizmos. Weirdly enough, however, the actress' real life may have been even stranger.


    She called her high school experience in Georgia "surreal" and a bit of a "culture shock." Bruckner said, "I had come from LA, where all my friends were acting, a lot of my friends were much bigger stars than I was, and I had never thought of myself as being famous, which is a weird word to say. It was very strange."


    Despite that, she said she did go on to make good friends and get a great education, adding, "But, yeah, it was pretty weird." 



    A photo posted by amy bruckner (@ameliabruckner) on



    Perhaps the biggest bummer from her time in school (for us anyway) was that she never became principal for the day, like she did in "Phil of the Future," which just seems like a missed opportunity. What the heck, Georgia?


    "They never made me principal for the day," said Bruckner. "But I do have some things from that episode ... I have a gigantic portrait that got painted of me. And, obviously, I was trying to get my high school to hang up that portrait because I'm super important," laughed Bruckner. "That’s all sarcastic," she added.



    So what does the future actually hold for the actress? Bruckner said she has been back in the entertainment world for around a year and a half, has already appeared in the Lifetime movie "The Assault," and has other roles on her radar. Though acting is her main focus, she added that she has some other priorities, as well, listing them as, "Eating, sleeping and women's rights." (So pretty much your typical trifecta.)


    Also, since her Disney character was from the 2100s, Bruckner shared a bit about what we can expect from the future, too. The actress said, "I think there's a lot of spray food, so it's easy to eat whatever you want. World hunger has ended. And there's no such thing as war anymore, and we live in this wonderland of equality." 


    Hey, sounds good to us ... unless this is just another of Pim's evil plots, which, to be honest, is probably the case ...




    Image: Tumblr




    Image: Tumblr


    Also on HuffPost:



    For a constant stream of entertainment news and discussion, follow HuffPost Entertainment on Viber.

    -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.












    0 0


    This might come as a shock, but "The Hunger Games" isn't about an eating contest. It's actually pretty dark stuff. Usually, Jennifer Lawrence shooting some arrows or singing us a song is enough to take our minds off that, but even she might not be able to help with this one.


    As if a story about kids killing each other wasn't messed up enough, there's a theory floating around out there that makes "Hunger Games" seem even darker, and Josh Hutcherson himself, who plays Peeta Mellark, is buying into it, too.


    The Theory: Foxface ate the poison berries on purpose.




    Image: Tumblr


    Poor, Foxface. She was the District 5 tribute who nearly made it to the end before she saw Peeta picking poison Nightlock berries and mistakenly ate them. Well, that's what we're led to believe, anyway. There's one problem, though: Foxface probably knew the berries were poisonous.


    Screeeeeeeeeeech. Wait, what?


    While watching the movie, savvy observers may have noticed one peculiar training scene that's pretty damning:




    Image: Imgur




    Image: Tumblr


    Yeah, Foxface was studying the plants she might encounter in the arena. 


    We already know Foxface is intelligent. She outlasts most of the other tributes by observing from afar and, remember, she was also clever enough to figure out a path through the booby traps to get to the Careers' food supply. Because of all this, the odds are ever in her favor that she remembered the Nightlock berries were poisonous, too.


    But if she knew the berries were bad, why would she eat them? For that, Redditor circlemanfan has an interesting explanation:






    Foxface knew what would happen if she blatantly committed suicide, it would look like defiance to the Capitol and her family would be killed. She decided to end it this way to make sure no one would think she was trying to outsmart anybody.






    Boom. There goes the dynamite.


    Foxface clearly didn't plan on being the girl on fire. She had the wherewithal to realize she couldn't just openly defy the Capitol like Katniss Everdeen later would. She saw Peeta picking the berries and realized it was her way out. 


    Yeah, heavy stuff.




    Image: Giphy


    Adding support, Josh Hutcherson is into the idea, as well. During a recent interview for his new project "The Rusted," the actor told The Huffington Post that the theory "kind of makes sense." He said "Hunger Games" author Suzanne Collins is really the person to ask about it, but added: "If I had to guess, I’d say there’s definitely potential that it’s true. She studied the lay of the land; she studied the plants; so she should know the plants that are food."


    So what do you think? Was it a fatal mistake? Or did Foxface, seeing her way out, sadly decide to eat poison berries on purpose?




    Dang. This is too much. JLaw, where you at? We could really use a song right about now.




    Image: Imgur


    Eh ... close enough. Thanks.

    Also on HuffPost:



    For a constant stream of entertainment news and discussion, follow HuffPost Entertainment on Viber.

    -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.












    0 0

    During a visit to his native Toronto on Wednesday, Drake took part in what might be the best TV reunion ever. 


    While attending the premiere for "We Are Disorderly," the rapper got a chance to hang out with some of his former "Degrassi: The Next Generation" co-stars. It's nice to know he hasn't forgotten where he came from (#notthebottom). 


    The 28-year-old star was joined by Lauren Collins (Paige Michalchuk), Daniel Clark (Sean Cameron) and Adamo Ruggiero (Marco Del Rossi). Collins shared the photographic evidence on Instagram, saying, "Some old friends got together last night at the #wearedisorderly premiere." 



    Clark also shared a snap from the night's events, saying, "Always great seeing this guy @champagnepapi @robbywclark@wearedisorderly #wearedisorderly#screening."


    The group of them were there supporting their fellow "Degrassi" alumni Al Mukaddam and Mazin Elsadig, who star in "We Are Disorderly."



    Drake starred as Jimmy Brooks on the teen drama series, a basketball star whose dreams of making it big are shattered when he (spoiler alert) gets shot. Following the show, he launched his music career with tracks like "Best I Ever Had," and the rest is history.


    But no matter how famous he gets, he'll always be Jimmy from "Degrassi."


    Also on HuffPost:



    For a constant stream of entertainment news and discussion, follow HuffPost Entertainment on Viber.

    -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.












    0 0

    Kirsten Dunst thinks the world expects too much from actors. 


    "What people expect of an actor is totally ridiculous," Dunst says in the September issue of Town & Country magazine. "It's unfair that an artist is expected to speak really well in public and have skin tough enough to withstand sometimes really hurtful criticism, but also, in order to do the job, be really sensitive and in touch with their feelings. So all you can do is be yourself -- just be who the hell you are."


    In 2008, the then 27-year-old actress voluntarily checked into Utah's Cirque Lodge for depression after years in the Hollywood limelight. After leaving rehab, she moved back to New York and took indie roles. Now, she is the lead in the Mulleavy sisters' "Woodshock"  -- which required her to lose 10 pounds and give up lunching at her favorite French bistro, Petit Trois -- and just wrapped filming the second season of FX's "Fargo." 


    "TV is a lot harder than film. A lot harder," she says. "When I got the part, my friend Lizzy [Caplan], who is on Masters of Sex, said, 'Be sure to get B12 shots to get you through the week.' I was like, 'Really? That sounds very dramatic, Lizzy.' By the third week I was all over the B12. It was one of the best roles I've ever played -- the writing is spectacular -- but by the end I was tapped out."


    Check out Town & Country for more



    Also on HuffPost: 



    For a constant stream of entertainment news and discussion, follow HuffPost Entertainment on Viber.

    -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.












    0 0



    Jennifer Aniston and Justin Theroux are reportedly married! 


    According to People, the couple wed on Wednesday at their home in Bel Air, California. Sources told the website the pair exchanged vows in front of about 70 friends and family members. 


    If the photos posted on TMZ are a true indication, the ceremony took place outside, where a large wooden deck was set up complete with classy seating arrangements for their star-studded guest list. Us Weekly is reporting Aniston's "Friends" co-star Lisa Kudrow was there, along with Howard Stern, Sia, Chelsea Handler, Emily Blunt, John Krasinski and Ellen DeGeneres


    There was also a giant wedding-like cake involved, and a pastor (holding a bible) was seen arriving on the property, TMZ notes. 


    But even with all these clues, it's tough to say whether or not Aniston and Theroux actually did get married. For all we know, this shindig may have just been a birthday celebration for Theroux (who turns 44 on August 10). 


    Aniston's rep told Gossip Cop: "If Jen and Justin feel the need to respond to tabloid and media guesswork about a private party held at their home they will let me know. In the meantime they will remain private, like they usually do.”


    The couple may or may not have gotten married, but they did have a giant fancy party at their house. And if they want to tell us it was a wedding, they'll do so when they feel like it. 


    If they did get married, we wish them all the best! Here's to hoping the tabloids will just let them live, without telling the world Jen is "pregnant and alone."


     


    Also on HuffPost:



    For a constant stream of entertainment news and discussion, follow HuffPost Entertainment on Viber.

    -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.












    0 0


    James Franco. Twins. Porn. Must you know more?


    Those key words pretty much sell "The Deuce," a new pilot from "The Wire" creator David Simon and directed by Michelle MacLaren ("Game of Thrones," "Breaking Bad"). HBO ordered the pilot on Thursday, along with another untitled Capital Hill project from Simon and journalist Carl Bernstein, according to Variety.


    "The Deuce" will be set in the New York porn industry in the 1970s and '80s and follow Franco as twin brother mobsters (this is just getting better and better). It's unknown when we'll get a first look at the project, which doesn't start shooting until October, but the imagination needn't go far for an idea of what "The Deuce" will look like:




    For more, head to Variety.


    Also on HuffPost:



    For a constant stream of entertainment news and discussion, follow HuffPost Entertainment on Viber.

    -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.












    0 0



    LONDON (AP) — George Cole, the British actor best known for playing conman Arthur Daley on the long-running TV series "Minder," has died. He was 90.


     Cole's career spanned more than 70 years from his first stage appearance in 1939 and included more than 40 films, including "Cleopatra," with Richard Burton and Elizabeth Taylor. From 1979-1994 he starred as cigar-smoking, Jaguar-driving Arthur Daley on ITV's "Minder."


     

     Set in London's criminal underworld, "Minder" followed the adventures of a small-time crook always on the lookout for his next dodgy deal. Cole's shifty but ambitious character captured the money-conscious spirit of Britain in the 1980s, and he was twice nominated for best actor by the British Academy of Film and Television.


     Cole was surrounded by his family when he died Wednesday at the Royal Berkshire Hospital after a short illness, said agent Derek Webster, who represents Cole's "Minder" co-star Dennis Waterman.


     Born in south London, Cole started working when he was 14, appearing in the chorus of "White Horse Inn" in 1939. He starred with Alastair Sim in the 1941 film "Cottage to Let," in which he played a resourceful evacuee from wartime London who unmasks a spy. Sim, an older actor with an established career, took him under his wing and the pair appeared together in several films, including the 1951 version of "A Christmas Carol."


     Cole also appeared in some 30 plays and numerous television series, including "Walt Disney's Wonderful World of Color" in the United States.


     Tributes poured in Thursday, including one from Tony Hall, the director general of the BBC.


    "George Cole was a wonderful actor and he has a very special place in the public's affection," he said. "He will be greatly missed."


     


    Also on HuffPost: 


    -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.












    0 0



    Universal released the first trailer for Angelina Jolie and Brad Pitt's "By the Sea" via Entertainment Weekly on Thursday, and it's a solid minute of pure melancholy.


    Written and directed by Jolie, "By the Sea" follows an estranged couple visiting France in the 1970s. The trailer is short, but makes it clear that Jolie's Vanessa and Pitt's Roland are sorting through some severe grief. "Are we ever going to talk about it," Roland asks in a voiceover, alluding to an unknown incident that's seemingly the cause for the couple's sorrow. If you're looking for something cheerful, go rewatch "Mr. and Mrs. Smith " instead.


    "By the Sea" was shot in Malta during Jolie and Pitt's real-life honeymoon -- let's hope it wasn't nearly as dreadful. The film also stars Mélanie Laurent, Niels Arestrup, Melvil Poupaud and Richard Bohringer.


    "By the Sea" opens Nov. 13.


    Also on HuffPost:



    For a constant stream of entertainment news and discussion, follow HuffPost Entertainment on Viber.

    -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.












older | 1 | .... | 719 | 720 | (Page 721) | 722 | 723 | .... | 764 | newer