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Celebrity news and blog articles from The Huffington Post

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    After headlining Brazil's "Rock in Rio" music festival, Rihanna stepped out in Rio de Janeiro looking like money. 


    Wearing a LaQuan Smith "money green" dress worth $2,500, the singer wore white sneakers, diamond jewelry and a bright red lip. Underneath her embroidered, mesh dress, Rihanna kept things simple with a black bra and underwear.



    @laquan_smith came thru wit da mean money gr€€n

    A photo posted by badgalriri (@badgalriri) on



    "Rihanna added a sporty element to such a sexy, elegant dress. I liked the relaxed and edgy approach she took," said LaQuan Smith, the designer, in a press release. "After all, she is in Brazil … which is quite appropriate." 



    Brazil

    A photo posted by badgalriri (@badgalriri) on



    Rihanna is no stranger to see-through style, as the singer once wore a custom Adam Selman gown made of more than 200,000 Swarovski crystals to the 2014 CFDA Fashion Awards.



    The dress was completely revealing and totally badass. In other words? Just another effortless look for Rih. 


    Also on HuffPost: 



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    Anyone who's listened to Ariana Grande's music knows that homegirl can SING. She has a vocal range and technical proficiency rare among pop stars this side of Mariah Carey, to whom she's often compared.


    Still, it takes real guts for any pop singer, no matter how great a voice they have, to try their hand at opera. It's an entirely different beast from pop music, one that generally takes years of training to master. But that didn't stop Grande from recording a duet with world-renowned opera tenor Andrea Bocelli. The two singers just released a version of the song "E più ti penso," which uses music from Ennio Morricone's score for Sergio Leone's 1984 movie "Once Upon a Time in America." 




    The song's lyrics, which were written by Italian composers Tony Renis and Mogol, tell the story of two lovers separated by a great distance. "E più ti penso" was first recorded in 2010 by an Italian tenor trio called Il Volo. Their version is totally solid -- but honestly, we can't help but prefer Bocelli and Grande's. 


    For the record, this is not a case of Grande besting her idol-slash-rival. Mariah Carey has also performed a duet with a famed male opera singer: the late Pavarotti. The fact that Carey wrote the song they performed together -- and that Pavarotti was arguably an even bigger star than Bocelli -- makes up for the fact that Carey sings in English, rather than Italian. 


    Also on HuffPost:



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    When you've made as many movies as Ridley Scott has, there's no option but to divorce yourself from the criticism your projects face. And there's no doubt Scott has faced a lot of it over the years, despite three Oscar nominations for Best Director. Fortunately for him, critics are on his side this time. "The Martian," which opens Friday, premiered to kudos at the Toronto Film Festival a few weeks ago and has spun that buzz into what is expected to be a lucrative box-office orbit. Based on Andy Weir's popular, NASA-approved debut novel, the film follows a skilled astronaut (Matt Damon) stranded on Mars and the earthbound NASA team working to bring him home. The supporting cast (Jessica Chastain, Chiwetel Ejiofor, Jeff Daniels and Kristen Wiig, to name a few) is impressive, and maybe -- just maybe -- "The Martian" will rocket its way to more Oscar glory for the 77-year-old British director. 


    The Huffington Post sat down with Scott earlier this week to discuss the film's reception, how his moviemaking process has (or hasn't) changed over the years and what he thinks of Matt Damon's recent Internet controversies. Beware vague "Martian" spoilers.


    How do you feel about people saying this is your best movie since “Blade Runner”? I’ve heard that a few times.


    Since “Blade Runner”? It’s like, where were you? Because I would go, well, “Legend” still runs now, “Blade Runner” just resurrected itself. I’m going to jump a few films, even though I don’t regret anything at all. “Thelma & Louise,” “Gladiator,” “Black Hawk Down” and “Hannibal,” which was pretty brutal but interesting. “American Gangster.” And I’m forgetting the other ones. Oh, “Exodus” last year. A lot of people didn’t get “Exodus,” but it’s a little bit like being a writer or a painter. When you do what I do, you have to have your own opinion about what you’ve just done. That opinion is private and whatever anyone says after that is kind of irrelevant, in a sense. With respect to critics, et cetera, I have to move on. I look at it, deliver it, finish it, say, “I’m really pleased with that,” and move on. I wouldn’t deliver it until I say, “I’m really pleased with it.”


    This is maybe the first film in a while that’s had all four cornerstones of success: emotion, action, humor, drama. And, above all things, it has optimism at the end. Now, “Blade Runner” had no optimism at the end -- it was what they call a film noir. In those days, I’d say “film noir” to a critic and he’d go, “Film what?” And I would say, “OK, let’s move on.” So you’re dealing with a lot of naiveté and a lot of -- how do I call it? -- it is politically incorrect to call it a white-bread attitude? It’s a bit lightweight. I just have to move on, because I don’t agree with that at all. But I mean, I hate to say that. Whatever generates interest is part of my job. That’s what I have to do.


    When were you able to develop that mantra of automatically moving on after you're done?


    It’s very important. If I ever come back, I’d like to come back as a professional tennis player. You cannot think about the last point you just lost; you have to move on to the next one. So I haven’t regretted anything. Actually, what I’d add to that list of my favorite films is “The Counselor.”


    If you think people didn't understand "Exodus," they certainly didn't understand "The Counselor."


    That was so challenging because it was quite dark. It was surprising -- there was only one moment of violence and that was it. But the mantra evolved for me. I didn’t do a film until I was 39 or 40. I was very successful in advertising. Very. At 23 or 24, I owned my own company that became one of the biggest in Europe, honestly. By the time I did a movie, I was kind of a businessman and by no means naïve. Therefore I’d already got that mantra in my head, which is fundamentally out of -- I don’t know how many -- two and a half thousand commercials, including the big one for Apple. "Am I communicating?" I ask that question all the time. I don’t give a shit if you’re doing theater, if you’re doing a book or if you’re doing film. Am I communicating? Am I making this clear to you? And those stories don’t always have the four quadrants to make everybody feel cozy. I don’t do cozy movies, so maybe this is the first cozy movie I’ve done.



    It’s a survival story, and because it ends on a bright note it leaves you feeling happy. Yet some of those movies you named that are beloved, like "Thelma & Louise," are pretty dark. 


    Well, yeah, but the film is a comedy. I could not allow them to go down and explode on the rocks. I had to freeze them in the air so it was metaphorical and philosophical.


    Had they gone down in the rocks, would the movie’s reception have been different?


    I don’t know, that’s the call. You just don’t know. Besides, it felt right to freeze. I didn’t freeze because of that choice -- I froze because it was the right thing to do. If you like, the journey continues for them. That’s what makes you walk out feeling, “Well, what would I have done?” The choice would mean 10 years inside, or worse.


    Something that "Gravity" did for the sci-fi genre was to illuminate how movies set in outer space are made now. And then along came "Interstellar" a year later. Did you use similar technology? Or did you even pay attention to those movies' techniques?


    I’m familiar with all those films, and I think “Interstellar” and “Gravity” were great. Even the one with Chris -- the comedy -- with Chris … Chris …


    Chris Pratt? “Guardians of the Galaxy”? 


    Yeah, I loved that. That was a relief. It was like, let’s get off this heavy superhero gig. But what they used to do that in “Gravity” was to use a technology that is very tried and trusted and infuriatingly frustrating because you’vve got one actor on four wires and you say, “Bring him in.” There’s no gravity and he’s floating in and if he comes in a little too far, you have to say, “Cut! Can you bring him in slower?” And then he’s going to come in and be acting and then you overshoot the mark and you say, “No! Cut! Let’s go again.” It drives me nuts. But that’s the only way of doing the idea of gravity, and then afterwards you have to remove the wires. You see the wires, so digitally you come in and paint the wires over. It’s awful. 


    How easily do you visualize the finished product?


    I’ve got one gift: I’m blessed with a good eye. And I now say that because I used to be criticized for my films being too beautiful or too visual. I’m going, “Huh? Well, we’re not doing a radio play, dude, we’re actually doing a movie.” 


    Which films were criticized for that?


    “The Duellists,” my first film, got hammered because it was too beautiful. And I'd just followed two years after Stanley Kubrick’s film with Ryan O’Neal, which I adored. [Editor's Note: He's referring to "Barry Lyndon."] I had got a lot of business because my commercials were very, very, very visual. So I developed this visual inner eye that I trusted. The inner eye could go to “Blade Runner” and work that one out. I was at a very, very good art school -- the biggest and the best, at the Royal College. After seven years, like doctors’ training, I could really draw. I could do a very good portrait of you right now. So I could storyboard very easily. I’ve got the real technique now of getting it down, and I now find, by the time I start a movie, that I’ve already filmed it on paper. I’ll put it down in front of me -- wide shots, close shots, medium shots, reverses, all that stuff. What I’m doing is, I’m being made to make a decision early on, and I think a lot of people make no decisions until they get to the set. That’s when the clock starts racing and it costs a lot of money. You cannot get on the floor and go, “What are we doing?” You have to go on the floor and say, “Right. Everyone over here, we’re going to do this.”



    Were you capable of doing that back when you made “Alien”?


    Yeah, yeah, yeah. Oh yeah. “The Duellists,” particularly. That was my first film, but because I could afford it, I found the book [by Joseph Conrad], which was a sketch for one of his big volumes on the Napoleonic era. It was a very nice writer called Gerald Vaughan-Hughes who penned the screenplay. It was a beautiful screenplay and off that, I got a completion bond and was going to take a hit if we went over financially. That whole film cost $800,000, all in, and then we got a prize at Cannes and I was off and running.


    How much did "The Martian" cost?


    Actually, way low. [Ed. Note: $108 million, according to Variety.]


    Good job making it look expensive, then.


    I did this in 72 days, not 130. That could have easily been 100 days. I move really quick by prepping the way I just described. Right now, I’m prepping and storyboarding, in my spare time, the “Prometheus" sequel, which is probably going to be called “Alien: Paradise Lost,” for February. I’ve already done, like, 20 or 30 pages. By the time we get to Christmas, I’ll have done 160. Even when I’m on the phone, I’m drawing. I should keep a book of telephone doodles.


    You could sell that. What's impressive about "The Martian" is how clear the scientific plot points are. Did NASA's involvement help with that?


    No, Andy had done his homework with scientists, and I think he’d even communed with NASA and some experts, who gradually got the message and became a fan of the book as the chapters were rolling off. So by the time the book was published, it became a book to read at NASA because I think they were impressed, amused and bemused. Therefore, when I decided I was going to do this, the first thing my production designer and I did was we called up NASA and we got them immediately because they said, “Oh yeah, you’re going to do the book? Oh, fantastic,” and because they like the spacesuits I do and stuff like that. They asked for my designs, and I said, “Well, I’ll show you mine if you show me yours.” So they’d show me what the habitat was going to be like, or what they think, in the 2020s and what they think the suit will look like in the 2020s. It looks like the Telebubbles. [Ed. Note: He means the Teletubbies.] I said, “OK, no, I’ll send you my suit.”


    But they were charming. Their enthusiasm was everything. [Drew Goddard, who wrote the script] said, and I keep repeating this because I think it’s a nice way to put it, “The film, the script, the story, the book, really, is like a love letter in science, because in it, a layman should get it, which is key." We don’t want this to be just for the nerds. It boils down to information: "Are they getting this OK?" You put the audience on a learning curve -- that’s when it’s most successful. It’s quite like separating yourself from all your artistic inclinations of description and saying, “What is this description? Get rid of this shit. 'He walks into a room, the room is red.' Get on with it. Don’t describe the room and what’s outside the fucking window. You’re boring the shit out of everybody.” 


    Before we wrap up, I want to ask about Matt Damon, who has landed in some hot water online over the past few weeks. 


    What's he done now?


    He made a comment on the show "Project Greenlight" about diversity being something that happens in front of the camera instead of behind it. And today an interview with The Guardian is circulating where he said it would better for gay actors' sexuality to remain a mystery. 


    Who said that?


    Matt Damon. 


    No!


    He did. And the Internet has not been kind to him in response, as expected. 


    Sure. I shall call him up immediately and twank him. [Ed. Note: We're not quite sure what "twank" means, but multiple HuffPost editors listened to the audio and we're fairly confident that is the word Scott used. He's British.]


    Could that sort of thing affect the opening of the movie?


    No. I think when you’re on camera and live, it’s really tricky. I was just watching Putin and I got so lost in the wilderness of what he was saying. I think it was deliberate. I was going, “What?” I think when you’re live, it’s tricky because of what you just described. And the world has got constipated -- I don’t want to say something terrible now -- with political correctness. Of course we should care, and in fact that’s the message of the movie. The message of the movie is not about action and NASA and the science of it all. What settles into it is helping each other. You can’t be on your own. Everyone needs somebody, and in this instance, everybody needs a group. That’s why I thought it was very healthy putting in the idea of the Chinese coming in to say, “You know what, let’s do it,” because really, the only way we’re going to get to Mars, I think, is if you get a coalition where you share the cost. To go to Mars now would be $200 billion. To share the cost and also share the crews, you take the best of the best. We should do that for governments, too.


    I think Matt just got his knickers in a twist. I think he’s probably reading it, saying, “Oh, shit.” He’s not like that. He’s one of the greatest, most user-friendly guys I’ve ever worked with. He’s really a sweetheart. Besdies, I should get pissed off. What do you mean, diversity doesn’t happen behind the camera? Wait a minute!


    "The Martian" opens Oct. 2. This interview has been edited and condensed. 


     


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    DJ Tanner and Steve Hale are back together again!  


    Candace Cameron Bure and Scott Weinger, who played the teen couple on "Full House," posed for a selfie last night, restoring our faith in love (even the kind from TV shows). Weinger shared the snap on what seems to be his Instagram page with the caption, "Sorry, Internet. #fullerhouse@candacecbure #iloveyoudj." Cameron Bure also shared the image on her account



    A photo posted by Scott Weinger (@scottweinger) on



    So does this mean they'll get back together for "Fuller House?" We're not sure if they'll be a romantic couple, but they are expected to reunite on the Netflix reboot. We can dream!


    Weinger also shared a snap of himself with Andrea Barber, aka Kimmy Gibbler. 


    "Selfie with Gibbler @andreabarber #fullerhouse #donttelldeej," he wrote. 



    A photo posted by Scott Weinger (@scottweinger) on



    The series is expected to air next year on Netflix, with many of the original cast members -- including Bob Saget, Dave Coulier, Jodie Sweetin, and John Stamos -- set to reprise their roles. 


    We're still holding out hope that Mary-Kate and Ashley Olsen will make an appearance. 


     


    Also on HuffPost: 



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    Ondi Timoner, known for her documentaries "Dig!" and "We Live in Public," has chosen a new subject: Russell Brand. "Brand: A Second Coming" follows Russell while he begins his stand-up tour, Messiah Complex, only to put that on the backburner to instead try to rally the world to revolution. Thankfully, this isn't your stock stand-up tour movie that simply beats out bits with clips of the comedian doing press, getting "real" in his hotel room, and talking about how hard it is being funny. It's an honest-to-god look at Russell Brand and why he is the way he is. It also challenges viewers to look at the world around them and question what it means to have a fulfilling life: You see Brand achieve everything our society tells us should make us happy -- fame, money -- only to be immensely disappointed when he gets it.


    I sat down with writer, director and producer Timoner to talk about Russell and the difficulty of documenting him.


    I watched your TED talk and I gathered that your focus is on people who had to give up a lot to have a fulfilling life. Is that correct?


    Yes, it’s kind of twofold. There are people who have to give up a lot to have their lives matter. And then there are impossible visionaries. They inspire people to step into the impossible and have their lives matter. Which is something regular life does not provide us an opportunity to do. In terms of, “What am I doing with my time on earth? Is it fulfilling? Is it creative? Is it adding to the universe? And to society in general?” We’ve been taught to want other things.



    Yes, it feels good to be told to do something and then to do that and be told you’re a good boy. I can see how people would get addicted to that!


    (Laughs) Yeah, you get praised for drawing inside the lines, don’t you?


    Oh, yeah. Do you think you focus on these people because you find yourself to be that person?


    I might have become that. I mean, Russell calls me his "ginger ninja shadow." I might have always been that and maybe that’s why these people are drawn to me. Maybe that’s why I’m drawn to them. I don’t know if I’m a visionary. That’s a bit out of the realm of humility to say. To admit to you that I think I’m a visionary, you know? I’m pretty tenacious. What I took on when I took on the project was really difficult. You know, making a film about Russell brand is not easy. It’s like taming a Tasmanian devil. He doesn’t really like to be documented. He likes to perform. And he’s a very private person.


    Oh, really?


    Yeah! But he asked me to make this film really hardcore. And when we agreed to do it together, we agreed it would be about him and I would have creative control. Once he agreed, he tried to control everything else in a way. Whether it was dashing the itinerary or negotiating how many times I could be in the car. Or whatever it was. He’s so jaded. He doesn’t want his life to become the subject of another tabloid piece. He doesn’t really want everyday to feel like he’s living for the camera. At the same time, he asked me to make this film. And he cares about what it is that he’s doing. He cares to have that documented. So it’s that tug of war all the time where he would ask me to leave the car. And then I’d get called 5 minutes later to get back in the car. But I love the guy, let’s be clear. 




     Do you think the time in the car was rehearsed or was it genuine private time?


    No, I got private time. To the point where his manager was like, “I can’t stand to be around the two of you in the same vortex for any length of time.” 'Cause I would get under his skin. I think on an intellectual level, he’s a genius. And I would just give it my all to rise to his level and go toe-to-toe with him. Because you don’t get anywhere with people if you just praise them. There are many sides to a human being and I love the gray area. I don’t want to make just a straight hero of someone because it’s not true. He’s somebody who has walls around him. At the same time, he’s the most open guy on earth. 


    Where does the Russell story end? Does he have to give up anything else?


    It’s so hard to say with a man that unpredictable. To see him start Trews and then this hockey-stick rise of attention. Then he walks away from that. I went back to document him as he was writing a book, and we didn’t even know he was going to write a book! And alongside the books came all these social movements and the opening the Trews café. He’ll always do stand-up. It’s where he lives, spiritually. Is he going to give up everything the western world has to offer? I don’t see that happening. But then again, I would’ve never predicted he would leave Hollywood.


    Like [in the film] when he sits in that hut in Kenya and says to that woman, “As a white millionaire, I’m uncomfortable.” People don’t say that. They think that, but they don’t say it. A lot of times he puts his foot in his mouth but a lot of the time he says things that are just so true. And he does things that people aren’t willing to do. That’s why I loved making a movie about him. I hope people take this as a second coming for themselves. I hope it will inspire some people to go home and think, “What am I doing?”


    Now, will he become a politician? I don’t know. But I don’t think he thinks commentary is enough. We had a debate about this. And he doesn’t think being an artist is enough to change the world in a significant way.


    So does he think he’s a messiah?


    I don’t know what he thinks because I’m not Russell. I don’t know. He has a self-destructive element of his genius. It’s like some ying-yang balancing of the universe. And when he looks in the mirror he isn’t seeing it accurately like the rest of us. I don’t think he can see what we see. And I think he has a lot of self-criticism. And he thinks if he’s not funny every second, it’s not worthy.




    I think this documentary is definitely a huge step in Russell’s campaign to be taken more seriously. It’s even more powerful than that clip of him on "Morning Joe." So great.


    I had to put that in the movie.


    How have the first screenings been going?


    Great. It opened SXSW. I believe it was the first documentary in a decade. It was a very cool honor to open the whole conference. And it played twice at USC. The students just loved it. I kind of made it for them, actually. I made it for kids to tell them to stop wasting their time. If they can see a role model go and get everything that they want (become a Hollywood star/marry the world’s biggest pop star) and then just walk away from it. Like, the proof is in the pudding. That’s why I said to Russell that this movie couldn’t just be you going around talking to people. Your life story has it all. You grew up thinking you needed to claw your way out of the “penitentiary of anonymity,” as he calls it. In this, you get everything you ever wanted and it’s SO profoundly disappointing.


    I also think it’s incredibly inspiring how he’s able to stay sober. 13-14 years now. And to help so many addicts while he’s being lambasted for stepping outside of the box that he’s been put in. I mean, he really didn’t like the headlines that I put in the movie. But I told him, you don’t win in the end if you win all along the way. If you lose along the way, you win in the end.


    If it’s nonstop praise, it wont be a good movie.


    That’s what I’m saying. People don’t want to root for a guy who has everything great happen to him all the time. They want to see you scared in the bathroom trying to get your shit together before you propose that America should overthrow its government.


    On "The View"!


    On "The View"! You know what I mean!? They want to see that you’re facing down your fears with courage. If it looks too easy it’s like, fuck it. So I had to protect the film for his sake. I even fled to Southeast Asia at one point. He was just sending so many changes and notes. And then I got invited to show my work to the Queen of Bhutan. And so I said, “I think it’s time to go to Bhutan.” But then two days later, I contacted my Mom to let her know I was still alive. And my mom says, “Did you get Russell’s flowers yet?” I was like, ha ha, but then she says, “No, his office contacted your office to see where you were to send you flowers.” And I looked at these exotic flowers on my desk and lo and behold, there was a note from Russell. And then 10 more changes came in. The changes just kept coming in. But I said, the last thing you want is a puff piece. And he said “Well, that’s the second worst thing that could happen.” Meaning that this was the first. I think he thinks this film will derail his mission but he should know by now that it’s only going to help.


    "Brand: A Second Coming" premieres in New York Oct. 1.


     


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    Season 41 of "Saturday Night Live" premieres on Oct. 3, and host and musical guest Miley Cyrus is sure to bring the nakedness fun.  


    In promotions for the upcoming episode, Cyrus jokes with "SNL" cast member Taran Killam that she'll be performing, "with or without clothes, we're not sure yet." 


    "With clothes," said Killam, shaking his head confidently. 


    In another promotion, Killam asks Cyrus what she'll be wearing on Saturday and the singer responds by holding up tiny pieces of gold fabric, seemingly tied together with black string. We would assume she was joking, if it didn't look so close to what Cyrus wore when she hosted the VMA's


    Cyrus slayed her last "SNL" performance, when she covered Paul Simon's "50 Ways To Leave Your Lover" on "SNL 40." It also appears she's become close with certain "SNL" cast members, as Cyrus recently Instagrammed a video with the show's Leslie Jones. The topic of discussion? Pasties and zit cream, of course. 


    The singer captioned the photo, "Schooling @lesdogggg on how 2 turn up hurrrr gramgram before da season premier of @nbcsnl #mileyonsnl#oct3." 



    Schooling @lesdogggg on how 2 turn up hurrrrr gramgram before da season premier of @nbcsnl #mileyonsnl #oct3

    A video posted by Miley Cyrus (@mileycyrus) on



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    The muse must be strong in the family of Green Day's Billie Joe Armstrong.


    The musician's 16-year-old son is set to release a debut EP with California label Burger Records under the name Jakob Danger. (Real name Jakob Armstrong, but Danger IS literally his middle name. His parents clearly anticipated this).


     You can hear his song "King of the World" and others on YouTube.


    Armstrong/Danger dynasty!




     H/T NME.


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    The hosts of "The View" just can't seem to keep themselves out of boiling hot water. 


    Candace Cameron Bure was the latest of the group to make some controversial comments on Wednesday's show by comparing Internet trolling and cyberbullying to rape


    Cameron Bure, the resident conservative voice, made her comments during the Hot Topics segment of the show. The hosts were discussing Lena Dunham's decision to hand over control of her Twitter after she recevied a slew of hateful comments on a picture she posted of herself in her boyfriend's underwear. Dunham called the responses "verbal violence." 


    Whoopi Goldberg didn't take a stance on Dunham's decision but she did manage to pull out the victim-blaming card. 


    "The minute you put yourself out there in someone's underwear, you can't be surprised," she said. UGHHH. How many times must we stress that people should be able to wear whatever they want without being criticized for it? A woman's body in underwear should not be shocking, people ...


    Then, the former "Full House" star chimed in, seemingly making the discussion about herself. 


    "I've never been more verbally abused in my life than on Twitter, and specifically in the last few months, having come on this show," she said. "A lot of people don't agree with me. That's fine, don't agree with me. But you don't have to verbally abuse me and rape me."        


    "That's what they do to me on Twitter," she added. 


    Receiving floods of hate on social media is terrible (one of our writers found out firsthand when she shared a story about Justin Bieber being "bratty"), and no one asks to be bullied online, just like no one asks to be raped. In that sense, we can maybe see where the co-host was coming from. But at the same time, both rape and cyberbullying are separate issues and don't need to be -- nor should they be -- lumped together. 


     


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    Reports surfaced earlier this summer that George R.R. Martin, author of the A Song of Ice and Fire series, would be overseeing a "Game of Thrones"-inspired coloring book. As of Thursday, it appears the book is finally here, and with a release date.  


    The book, which will feature 45 exclusive black-and-white illustrations from famous fantasy illustrators, is available for pre-order on Amazon. It will officially go on sale on Oct. 27 for $10.59. 



    Not only does the cover look amazing, but the description for the coloring book (All men must draw!) is admittedly epic: 



    In a world where weddings are red, fire is green, and debts are paid in gold, countless images leap off the page thanks to the eye-popping intricacy of the vivid settings and details. Now, for the first time, fans of this blockbuster saga can fill in the blanks and marvel as this meticulously imagined universe comes to life, one sword, sigil, and castle at a time. 



    At least this will give fans something to do before Season 6 premieres in April 2016. Pre-order the book on Amazon here, and mark Oct. 27 in your calendar now. 


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    Charlie Hall is the son of "Seinfield" and "Veep" star Julia Louis-Dreyfus and comedian Brad Hall. While his pedigree won't help him on the basketball court now that's he joined Northwestern's team as a walk-on, it generates a lot of press and yada yada yada.


    Hall, a 6-foot-5, 205-pound freshman forward, averaged 15.3 points, 11 rebounds and five assists per game during his senior season at Crossroads in Los Angeles, according to Northwestern's media guide.


    The left-hander shows some pretty good skills in his highlight reel:



    Charlie Hall Highlights May 2014

    "Even if Hall doesn't help the on-court product, he will certainly help boost the off-court atmosphere," Inside NU notes.





     It should also be noted that Northwestern has not finished higher than seventh in the Big 10 conference in the last 11 years, so hopefully the kid can help.


    Dime Magazine wondered if he could pull any moves like his mom:



    Seinfeld - The Elaine Dance

    God we hope not.


    Here's Charlie's highlight reel:




     H/T Uproxx


     


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    Gina Rodriguez has dealt with her share of online discrimination, and the actress recently proved she isn't afraid to take twitter trolls head on.


    The "Jane The Virgin" star first spoke up about the discrimination she's experienced within the Latino community, in August, after an Instagram caption she'd written in Spanish received a slew of criticism over her fluency. Rodriguez, once again, faced scrutiny over her language skills by a Barcelona-based Twitter user, Sergio Garcés, on Monday. 


    But the 31-year-old actress was quick to put him in his place. 








    The "hater," as Rodriguez called him, even went as far as to say that she and other U.S. Latinos tout their heritage for their own personal gain.  





    Rodriguez quickly corrected him in a tweet where she said that her heritage isn't something she can choose to own or disown, adding that, it also isn't something Latinos can use in their favor. 





    After Rodriguez schooled Garcés on the Latino experience in the U.S., the exchange ended with him tweeting that he "didn't mean to sound rude" and he hoped Latinos in the U.S. would be "represented as they deserve." But overall the conversation was in line with "interracial Latino racism," a topic that Rodriguez shed light on in August. 


    “When did we decide there are certain criteria that make you Latino enough?,” Rodriguez told The Huffington Post. "It’s like anybody turning to you and being ‘You ain’t human enough, you ain’t pretty enough, you ain’t tall enough, you ain’t big enough.’"


    "What do you mean I’m not enough?," she added. "No, I am enough. I am fully enough. And you’re enough. And the girl that’s half and half is enough. And the girl that only speaks Spanish is enough.”



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    Mazel tov, Seth Rogen, you just won this week's best #ThrowbackThursday photo. The "Neighbors" star blessed us with a photo from a very special moment in his adolesence -- his bar mitzvah. 


    Observe, the awkward length of the hair, the aggressively buttoned button-up, the vest for good measure, and the not-pictured-but-almost-certainly-present pair of socks he was wearing, because nobody keeps their shoes on at a bar mitzvah: 





    Rage. 


    The 33-year-old used the precious photo to promote a contest. Apparently Rogen's "Freaks and Geeks" co-star James Franco is having a bar mitzvah for Rogen's organization, Hilarity for Charity, which raises awareness for Alzheimer's disease. 


     


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    When it comes to election day, Jennifer Lawrence will definitely not be voting for Donald Trump, even if the odds seem to be in his favor. 


    In a recent interview with Entertainment Weekly, "The Hunger Games" star was asked about the possibility of Trump moving into the White House, to which she responded, "If Donald Trump becomes president, that will be the end of the world." 


    "I'll back you up on that," added her co-star Liam Hemsworth. 


    Josh Hutcherson also added his two cents to the discussion saying, "It's a publicity stunt. It can't be real." (Sadly, Josh, it is. But we feel you.) 


    JLaw continued, mentioning that what Trump supporters seem to love about the real estate mogul is his brutal honesty, aka his serious lack of any filters


    "I was watching him on the campaign trail and one guy said, 'I love Donald Trump because he’s saying everything I’m thinking and I just can’t say it because of the PC factor,'" she said, adding sarcastically, "And I'm thinking ... 'That's who I want representing my country, somebody politically incorrect. That will just be perfect.'"  


     


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    2015-10-01-1443723954-4845390-SR14004993_0.jpg

    The reason for Kaley Cuoco's divorce from professional tennis player husband Ryan Sweeting is still up for debate, but we have a few theories of our own.

    Let's take a look back to March of last year, when The Big Bang Theory star splashed out $5.499 million for Khloe Kardashian and Lamar Odom's former marital mansion... and we all know how that marriage ended: Divorce.

    Could the breathtaking Mediterranean-style villa be taking the breath out of marriages? We don't really care either way, because the Tarzana home is still absolutely stunning. If you're in the buyer's market for a seven-bedroom, eight-bathroom home that spans 8,000 square feet, we urge you to keep an eye on this one... it could be hitting the market soon. But couples beware; this home has some serious relationship baggage. Although, it's hard to imagine fighting with someone when you have THREE custom-built walk-in closets and a spa-like master bathroom with TWO sinks. You don't even have to share a sink with your sweetheart! Of course, we need to mention the stunning outdoor pool and spa.

    Before Cuoco scooped up the Kardashian-Odom abode, she lived in a beautiful Mediterranean-style Sherman Oaks mansion (see below). She sold the home in May 2014 for $2.565 million. If we had to guess, Cuoco's next crib might be of similar Mediterranean-style.

    2015-10-01-1443723983-8695697-SR14054736_0.jpg

    Good luck, Cuoco and Sweeting. If you two have tastes good enough to buy the former (and gorgeous!) Kardashian-Odom home, we can't wait to see what your bachelorette and bachelor pads look like.

    While it must be a tough time for Cuoco, reports say she seems to be doing pretty well, thanks to her new horse Zaza (picture below from Cuoco's dog's Instagram account).

    2015-10-01-1443724030-6593740-image11.PNG

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    Rowan Blanchard continues to prove that she's not only one of the most talented, but the most aware young actresses in Hollywood today.  


    The 13-year-old star of Disney Channel's "Girl Meets World" revealed in an Elle interview posted on Sept. 28 that she once had to call out an interviewer for asking her a sexist question on the red carpet. 


    "Someone recently asked if I had any dieting tips for other teenage girls," Blanchard said. "Try and reverse that. 'Do you have any dieting tips for other teenage boys?'"


    For the young actress, being asked about her dieting habits is not only rude, but absolutely absurd. "I mean, come on. I don't diet! I'm thirteen! Nobody my age should be dieting or trying to change themselves because society says so. And seriously, I'm thirteen!"


    Blanchard then continued with some of the best dieting advice ever given: "The only 'dieting tip' I have is, like, if you don't order fries, you'll probably be mad."



    Blanchard, an ambassador for the #TeamHeForShe feminism campaign, says that she's fine with answering questions about who she's "wearing" on the red carpet, but that shouldn't be the focus. 


    "It's cool to spotlight a new designer on the runway, and to contribute to the fashion world that I love," Blanchard added, "But don't make my story, and who I am, be my dress, while my male co-star's story is how he picks scripts and gets inspired."


    Blanchard has been extremely vocal about feminism and gender equality over the last year. In June, she gave a speech calling out the wage gap for #TeamHeForShe and in August she wrote a blog post on the importance of intersectional feminism. If Blanchard is this amazing at just 13 years old, there's no telling  how much of a badass she's going to be in the future. 


     H/T Elle


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    In one of the scariest videos you'll see this week/month/year, Donald Trump is being prayed for by some pastors and Rabbis. According to Facebook, their names are Kenneth Copeland, Rabbi Kirk Schneider and Pastor Paula White. 


    Watch the video and we'll meet back up in a sec!



    Kenneth Copeland, Rabbi Kirk Schneider and Pastor Paula White praying for Donald Trump...#trump-Darrell Scott Robert Scott

    Posted by James Davis on Tuesday, September 29, 2015

    Ok great, so he couldn't care less! If you aren't convinced, let me present the evidence.


    Exhibit A:


     



     


    Exhibit B:


     



     


    Exhibit C:


     



     


    Now that it's settled, let's try to guess what Donald Trump was ACTUALLY thinking about! Because it definitely wasn't God.


     













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    More than 20 years have passed since Pamela Anderson and Tommy Lee got married, four days after meeting, on a beach in Cancun. Their relationship over those 20 years has been tumultuous even by Hollywood standards -- they got divorced in 1998, but got back together more times than anyone can count. Now, though, they finally seem to be friends. 


    The exes both attended a party celebrating PETA's 35th anniversary Wednesday night in Los Angeles. It could have been awkward, of course. But instead, the former "Baywatch" star and "Mötley Crüe" drummer had a friendly chat -- and even a warm hug. Lucky for us, photographers were on hand to capture the whole thing.



    Don't get any big ideas, though: there's no reason to believe that the two are getting back together again in any kind of romantic way. Though Anderson was divorced for a second time earlier this year, from pro poker player Rick Salomon, Lee attended the event with his fiancée, Greek-German singer Sofia Toufa


    Plus, Anderson and Lee -- who have two children together -- were both at the event in an official capacity. Anderson was one of the co-hosts of the event, along with Anjelica Houston, while Lee received an award for his work on animal rights


    “SeaWorld sucks, fur murders and PETA fuckin’ rules,” Lee said in his acceptance speech. “I thank you from the bottom of my heart, and the animals thank you.”



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    New couple alert: Travis Barker and Rita Ora are dating!


    Barker's rep confirmed the news to TMZ. The celebrity news site is reporting that the couple has been spending a lot of time together since meeting at the Power 106 All-Star Celebrity Basketball Game in Los Angeles just over a week ago. 


    The former Blink-182 drummer shared a photo on Instagram of him and the "Body on Me" singer at the game. He added the caption, "Me and the beautiful @ritaora at @power_106#Power106AllStars❤️   ." 



    A photo posted by travisbarker (@travisbarker) on



    Barker previously dated UFC ring girl Arianny Celeste, while Ora once dated Calvin Harris and Rob Kardashian. 


    The Huffington Post has reached out to Ora's rep for confirmation. 


     


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    Here's what we know about Jaden Smith's new girlfriend -- the one he was seen packing on the PDA with at New York Fashion Week. 


    Here name is Sarah Snyder, she's 19 and she was arrested and charged with felony Grand Larceny for allegedly stealing a $16,000 Hermes Birkin handbag from a store in Bedford, New York, this past February.


    Snyder appeared in court on Wednesday and her lawyer told "Entertainment Tonight" she would not be accepting any offers or pleas from the district attorney.


    "The only thing we are interested in is an exoneration and an apology,” her lawyer Robert Schuster said. 


    Meanwhile, Snyder made it pretty clear just how seriously she is taking the charges when she posted an Instagram photo wearing a T-shirt with her mugshot on it. 



    56 nights

    A photo posted by @sarahfuckingsnyder on



     


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    Craig, Daniel Craig stars as James Bond for a fourth time in the latest installment of the series, "Spectre." The actor has been on the press circuit for his famous role and recently sat with the Daily Mail to talk about getting prepared for the film and why he isn't actually like Bond at all. 


    Craig, who is 47 years old, told the news outlet that getting in shape to play Bond is extraordinarily tough. 


    "I work myself to death," said Craig, who also admitted that he's doing less stunts. "It’s getting harder. But such is life. I’ll keep going as long as I’m physically able." 


    During filming for "Spectre," Craig had to undergo arthroscopic knee surgery after injuring himself on set. Luckily, the on-screen Bond doesn't break. 



    And while many might assume that the tough actor is a lot like his character, Craig insists he's nothing like Bond in real life. 


    "I'm not strong and macho," said Craig. "I’m not James Bond. I am genuinely not him. I don’t need any of his lifestyle. I’m just an actor, folks -- it’s acting." 


    The newest Bond film is reportedly the most expensive Bond film ever made, coming in around $300 million. An estimated $36 million of that comes from smashed-up Aston Martin cars, which were destroyed in the making of the film. 


    Catch Craig in "Spectre" when it premieres Nov. 6 in the U.S.  


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