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Celebrity news and blog articles from The Huffington Post

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    On Saturday night's episode of "Oprah: Where Are They Now?", former child star Danny Pintauro revealed that he has been living with a big secret for more than a decade: He is HIV-positive.


    Everyone remembers the young, blond-haired Pintauro as Jonathan on the family sitcom "Who's the Boss?" For eight years, Pintauro played the son of a driven single mother, winning over audiences with his nerdy charm. But, in the years after "Who's the Boss?" ended, the once-lighthearted little boy grew into a complicated young man trying to live a private life in the public eye.


    In his sit-down with Oprah, Pintauro -- who goes by "Daniel" now -- begins the interview by sharing his long-held secret.


    "I wanted to tell you this a long time ago, but I wasn't ready. I'm ready now," Pintauro says. "I'm HIV-positive, and I have been for 12 years."


    Part of why Pintauro hadn't spoken publicly about his health before, he says, is because he wasn't sure if people were ready for a conversation of this magnitude. "It's just a big deal, you know? It's not something that people are really talking about right now," Pintauro says.



    This isn't the first time Pintauro has revealed a private detail about his personal life. In 1997, when he was a college student, Pintauro came out as gay -- but he hadn't exactly planned to. "I was outed," Pintauro says. "It wasn't by choice."


    The actor says that a tabloid reporter called him back then saying the paper was going to out him whether he cooperated or not. His former "Who's the Boss?" co-star, Judith Light, encouraged Pintauro to participate as a way of controlling the conversation. "It was the best thing," Pintauro says now. "'They can't misquote you,' she said. 'And as long as you give really responsible and mature answers, it can't be a bad article.'"


    And, as Pintauro realized, it wasn't. "Believe it or not, the 'National Enquirer' actually did a really fantastic, heartwarming article about it," he says. "I was shocked."



    Pintauro says he regularly underwent routine HIV testing every six months. Then, in March of 2003, his whole world changed.


    "I was living in New York at the time and completely clueless to the idea that I was positive. I went in for a regular checkup," Pintauro says. "It was just regular blood work. You go in, and you sort of waited two weeks on pins and needles -- or at least I did, because I was just terrified of the idea of getting HIV."


    Having come out of a two-year relationship, Pintauro admits later in the interview that he had been looking to explore more sexually and began using crystal meth as a means to that end. "I was doing crystal meth, which completely ruins your immune system. I'd been doing it at that point very briefly, but it was three weeks or so, off and on," he explains. "I had just come out of a two-year relationship, and I discovered in that relationship that there was more I wanted to explore sexually. Crystal meth takes away your inhibitions... And if you want to explore that adventurous side, taking the drug is going to put you there.


     "I was experimenting," he continues. "And believe it or not, I thought that I was being safe in that encounter. I know exactly when it happened."


    Though Pintauro doesn't go into those details, he does say that he doesn't remember the man's name. "I regret not knowing that, because that person has completely changed my life," he says.



    Even though antiretroviral drugs (ARVs) had been introduced by the time Pintatuo was diagnosed, dramatically increasing the lifespan of those with HIV and reducing their risk of transmitting the infection to others, Pintauro was still devastated by his diagnosis. He struggled to make sense of his feelings.


    "It was terrifying, and there was a sense of relief," he says. "It's backwards. You've spent so much time terrified that you're going to get it, and then you have it. You don't have to be terrified anymore."


    Today, Pintauro lives with his husband, Wil Tabares, in Las Vegas, and works as a restaurant manager. He told Oprah that his dreams in life are to open a bed and breakfast with Tabares, live a long life and be a beacon of light that can help make a difference to others along the journey. Pintauro also shared an important message for other men in the gay community.


     "What I want my community to realize is we need to take better care of ourselves," he says. 


    "Oprah: Where Are They Now?" airs on Saturdays at 10 p.m. ET on OWN.


    For more from "Oprah: Where Are They Now?", visit wherearetheynow.buzz.


    Also on HuffPost:


    -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.












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    Taylor Swift can't stop, won't stop expanding her squad, and there's nothing we can do about it. 


    The latest member to join is none other than rock legend Mick Jagger, who sang with Swift during her 1989 tour Saturday night. The Rolling Stones frontman and "Blank Space" songstress performed an energetic rendition of "(I Can't Get No) Satisfaction," complete with Jagger's signature moves and plenty of pyrotechnics. 


    Swift introduced the iconic rocker on stage by saying, "He’s one of the greatest entertainers of all time. This person has been knighted for his achievements and contributions to music. The person I’m about to bring onstage has been inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame with his band the Rolling Stones… My friend Mick Jagger is here!" 


    Watch the entire performance below: 




    Jagger is just the latest in a string of huge stars to join Swift on stage. Other guests have included Swift's model BFFs Karlie Kloss, Cara Delevingne and Martha Hunt, as well as Nick Jonas, Avril Lavigne, Alanis Morisette and Justin Timberlake


    Also on HuffPost: 


    -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.


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    All eyes were on Beyoncé as she took the stage at the 2015 Global Citizen Festival in New York's Central Park on Saturday night. Serving as the headliner for the festival, which raises awareness for social issues such as extreme poverty, Beyoncé belted out some of her biggest hits to a 60,000-plus crowd. 


    Starting off the show with her slowed down, "50 Shades of Grey" version of "Crazy in Love," the singer then transitioned into "Love on Top," "XO" and "Halo." She also pulled Ed Sheeran onstage for a surprise duet of "Drunk in Love." Hearing Sheeran sing, "If you scared, call that reverend, boy I'm drinkin'," will never get old. 




    Destiny's Child fans were also in for a pleasant surprise, as the 34-year-old broke out into some old-school songs like "Survivor" and "Jumpin', Jumpin'." 




    And of course, it wouldn't be a Beyoncé show without a few awesome costume changes: 



    As an added bonus, Eddie Vedder of Pearl Jam invited Blue Ivy's mama onstage for a beautiful cover of Bob Marley's "Redemption Song" to close out the festival.




    Also on HuffPost:


    -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.


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    Katie Holmes brought along a very special date to the 2015 Global Citizen Festival in Central Park Saturday: her daughter Suri Cruise. 


    The pair made a rare public appearance together as Holmes spoke at the festival, which aims to bring awareness to social issues such as extreme poverty. The 9-year-old waved before her mom addressed the crowd of thousands: 




    Other celebrities in attendance at the New York City festival included performers Beyoncé, Ed Sheeran, Chris Martin, Ariana Grande and Tori Kelly. 


    Suri Cruise is the only child of the "Dawson's Creek" actress and her ex-husband, Tom Cruise. 


    Also on HuffPost:


    -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.


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    Another day, another Kim Kardashian photo shoot. 


    The reality star appears on the cover of Sorbet magazine's latest issue, looking like a glam rock goddess with her fashion BFF, Riccardo Tisci. Fittingly, the theme of the issue is BFFs. On the cover, Kim is seen hugging the Givenchy creative director and even showing a tiny hint of a smile. 



    RICCARDO X KIM X SORBET MAG

    A photo posted by Kim Kardashian West (@kimkardashian) on



    In the rest of the images, which were shot by Ezra Petronio, the 34-year-old looks gorgeous. She's sporting an array of black garments, likely all Givenchy, as she channels her inner boho-goth-glam-rock chick (and maybe a little Stevie Nicks). 



    Glam Rock

    A photo posted by Kim Kardashian West (@kimkardashian) on




    #TheBFFIssue @sorbetmag @riccardotisci17

    A photo posted by Kim Kardashian West (@kimkardashian) on




    For all of the pics from Sorbet Mag go to KimKardashianWest.com or my app!

    A photo posted by Kim Kardashian West (@kimkardashian) on



    So dark. So mysterious. 


     


    Also on HuffPost: 


    -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.


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    Gwen Stefani treated her family to a little taste of Italy in California over the weekend.


    The No Doubt frontwoman and her three boys, Kingston, Zuma and Apollo, took in the sights and tastes at the Galbani Cheese Italian Feast of San Gennaro.  Stefani shared a couple of images on Instagram from the festivities, including this cute snap of her and Apollo. 


    "Pick me," the singer captioned the photo, poking fun at the fact that her toddler was clearly picking his nose. Kids, gotta love 'em. The toddler also sports his mom's modern motherhood sunglasses in the pic. 



    Pick me gx

    A photo posted by Gwen Stefani (@gwenstefani) on



    Cute! 


     


    Also on HuffPost: 


    -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.


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    Bindi Irwin recently told Entertainment Tonight that there's "someone special" in her life -- and it looks like she's ready to introduce the lucky guy to her 588,000 Instagram followers.  


    The "Dancing with the Stars" contestant posted this adorable black and white photo of herself and her boyfriend, Chandler Powell, on Saturday. "Thank you for always making me laugh, helping me to ice my foot when it hurts, making me tea and hugging me when I'm tired. You're amazing," the 17-year-old wrote alongside the sweet shot:



    A photo posted by Bindi Irwin (@bindisueirwin) on



    Powell is an 18-year-old wakeboarding pro who is part of Irwin's Wildlife Warriors team, a conservationist group that advocates for the protection of injured, threatened or endangered wildlife.



    A photo posted by Bindi Irwin (@bindisueirwin) on



    He has proven to be quite the supportive boyfriend, as he shared a photo of Irwin on the "Dancing with the Stars" set and urged his followers to vote for her in the competition:



    Call 1-855-234-5604 to vote for @bindisueirwin tonight on @dancingabc !!! Absolutely smashed ACDC last night!!

    A photo posted by Chandler Powell (@chandlerpowell) on



    Also on HuffPost:


    -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.


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    Since accepting an Oscar for her role in "Boyhood" in February with scathing comments about the wage gap, Patricia Arquette has become an outspoken advocate for gender equality. 


    In an interview with Fortune published this weekend, she discussed how sexism in Hollywood has affected her career. 


    "I pushed the boundaries as much as I could along the way," the actress explained. "I remember a director telling my agent that it would be great if I could lose 10 pounds as long as my boobs didn’t get smaller. I didn’t want to lose 10 pounds, and I didn’t."


    Gross. But then, pointing a finger at what she described as an excessively "image- and age-focused culture," she explained how sticking to her ideals hasn't always been easy.


    "We are teaching our daughters that all that matters is that they are this sexual ideal. ... There were times I turned down movies when I needed work financially, when I had a newborn, because the roles were inappropriate, or the director was inappropriate or unethical," Arquette explained in the interview. Although she acknowledged that she "can't complain" much about her career as a woman in Hollywood, the actress noted her achievements are "not common."


    "There are very few successful women in Hollywood, and that needs to change," Arquette said. Her comments reiterate the views on gender inequality she shared at San Francisco's Dreamforce Women's Leadership Summit earlier this month.


    "We are kind of lying to our daughters when we tell them they can do anything," she said before an audience at the event, explaining how disparate wages between men and women harm women in every industry. "Economically, girls are going to crash their heads against the glass ceiling and get cut up in the process."


    In her interview with Fortune, she linked her concerns about unequal pay to concerns about limited opportunity for women in and outside of Hollywood.


    "That is another reason I feel the way I do about gender pay equality," Arquette told the magazine. "I grew up in a time when women felt they couldn’t make those choices, when women couldn’t leave bad marriages and battered women stayed with their abusers because they couldn’t afford to do it alone."


    For the full interview, head to Fortune.


     


     Also on HuffPost: 



    For a constant stream of entertainment news and discussion, follow HuffPost Entertainment on Viber.

    -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.


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    Julia Hart worked as a high school English teacher for eight years before she quit her job to create "The Keeping Room." It's rare for a screenwriter's first script to also be her first script to get produced, though, given Hart's revisionist ideas, it only makes sense her career path would mix things up.


    "The Keeping Room" made its way to the big screen as a poetic, feminist Western, in which three women, left alone after the men left to fight the war, must defend their bodies and their home against Union soldiers.


    Hart shows her strength as a writer by refusing to simply plop women in the place of the stalwart hero, opting instead to explore the complexity available in subverting the politics of the genre. In addition to the apparent resurgence of the Western, Hart adds women to the landscape who are strong not in spite of their vulnerability, but because of it.


    In honor of the film's release this past Friday, The Huffington Post spoke to Hart about how she flipped the great American genre on its head and the key to creating nuanced female characters who are not just powerful but empowered.




    What inspired you to write "The Keeping Room"?


    I grew up watching Westerns. I love Westerns, but I definitely had this longing to see a strong woman walk through the swinging doors instead of a man. 


    I also heard a story that inspired it at a friend's family farm in Georgia. After we all had a little bit of moonshine, my friend starting telling me about the myth that came with the farm when they bought it, which was that there were two union soldiers buried out in the field. I thought that was so fascinating because they would have had to have been put there by the women who were left alone in the house at the time. So, that was where “The Keeping Room” started for me. 



    I love Westerns, but I definitely had this longing to see a strong woman walk through the swinging doors instead of a man.



    There's definitely a masculinity inherent in the Western -- the ideas of ownership and power are crucial to the genre-- how did you reinvent that through a feminist lens?


    You can’t just put a woman into a classic male role. You have to reinvent it so it is inherently female. I just thought about all of the classic tropes and cliches of the Western and tried to turn them upside down and make sure that they felt realistically feminine.


    The women in the movie are emotional and emotionally connected and emotionally ravaged by the experience. It’s not that classic Western character who’s simply stoic and strong. They need the connection they have with each other. They need to break down and cry. You get all of those colors, that I think you maybe don’t always see classically in the genre.


    That's important, I think, to see strong female characters who are also messy and complicated.


    You know, in playing around with their resistance, I was thinking in terms of redemption and fear. When you are a woman alone and you are being attacked by a man who is physically more powerful than you and perhaps has more experience with these weapons, you would be afraid. And I think that a lot of the time because women are physically less strong or inexperienced in a way with violence, you have to use that fear to empower yourself.


    Ah, that's interesting: fear as a tool.


    Yeah, I think fear and empowerment are connected. You know, they use the adrenaline that causes in order to defend themselves.


    Usually, when we see a “female action hero,” she’s a super-human-CGI-ed and tough, but it's not real. What I loved about these women is that they're real. The actors are doing everything you see on screen. There are no special effects. Brit [Marling] is really riding that horse, chopping that wood, loading and firing that gun. I think there’s something powerful about not an imaginary woman defending herself, but a woman actually doing it. It's almost shocking because we’re not used to seeing it.



    I was insistent that, no, none of the men can come in and rescue them.



    How do you feel about the idea of women being saved? Is it possible to have strong female characters be rescued by a man? You obviously avoided that in "The Keeping Room."


    That was very important to me, and I had to defend that idea all the way through the shooting process. I was insistent that, no, none of the men can come in and rescue them.


    For example, the character of Bill, who is Mad’s lover, comes back to try and save her. It was very important to me to me to show their love and that he would risk his life to come back for her, but also that he not be the one to rescue them. It felt so essential to the type of story I was telling that the women ultimately rescue themselves.



    You can be your messy, complicated self and that doesn’t mean you’re not a strong woman.



    Is that a rule you have for future films as well? I know you just wrote and directed a second film, "Miss Stevens."


    For me, with other projects I’m working on, I’m looking at these classic genres and these classic tropes that have been dominated by men and turning them around and making them female. In the case of "The Keeping Room," it's a Western. I’m also working on a crime thriller. There’s a lot of stories about women that haven’t been told in these genres and there's a lot we can do there.


    In flipping male-dominated genres on their heads, how do you define "strong" female characters?


    I think the mistake that a lot of movies make -- and I don’t want to name any -- is just kind of dropping a woman into the role of the man. You know, inserting her as the stoic figure who has superhuman strength. I’m sure there are woman who are like that. But the truth of the matter is there are a lot of women who aren’t.


    I think what’s so important about feminism is not just showing the “strong” impervious woman, but really showing that women are complicated and messy and emotional. You can be your messy, complicated self and that doesn’t mean you’re not a strong woman. 


    This interview has been edited and condensed.


    -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.


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    Houston Texas defensive end J.J. Watt let everyone know on Sunday that he loves the '90s classic sitcom "Saved by the Bell." He's even doing his part to get a few cast members to reconnect on social media.


    After the Texans' 19-9 win over the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, Watt posted a picture he took with Mario Lopez, who famously played A.C. Slater on the hit show. Watt's defensive teammate, linebacker Kailee Wong, is Lopez's brother-in-law


    In Watt's tweet, he cleverly dropped , referencing one of the characters on the show. He couldn't know at the time, but it turned out to be a forward-thinking hashtag from Watt.





    Watt's hashtag question was answered shortly after his tweet. Actress Tiffani Thiessen, who played Kelly Kapowski on the show, saw Watt's plea for answers and responded in an Instagram post.



    @justinjames99 I heard you were looking for me. I'm in LA catching up on my reading. Btw, good game today. #houstonismysecondhome

    A photo posted by Tiffani Thiessen (@tiffanithiessen) on



    Watt was understandably stoked to get the shoutout from Thiessen.





    Dare we say that Watt was "SO EXCITED!" to get the shout out from Thiessen?



    Also on HuffPost:



    -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.


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    Kanye West says he'll be running for president in 2020, but first he's going to rub elbows with politicians in San Francisco this Red October. 


    The rapper is slated to perform at San Francisco's Warfield theater for a DNC fundraising event on Oct. 10, according to NBC Bay Area. The outlet reports that tickets will be going anywhere from $250 to $10,000 for patrons to hear songs from West's new album, "Swish." President Obama is also expected to make an appearance. 


    Though West has been public about his support for Obama, the rapper recently made comments praising Republican candidate Dr. Ben Carson. 


    "As soon as I heard [Ben] Carson speak, I tried for three weeks to get on the phone with him. I was like, this is the most brilliant guy," said West in an interview with Vanity Fair


    West isn't the only one in his family to get political, as supermodel sister-in-law Kendall Jenner recently made a video for "Rock the Vote" about suffragettes.


    In early August, the rapper and his wife, Kim Kardashian West, also posted this epic selfie with Hillary Clinton. 





    Pretty soon, that hashtag will be #KanyeForPresident. 


    Also on HuffPost: 



    For a constant stream of entertainment news and discussion, follow HuffPost Entertainment on Viber.

    -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.


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    Justin Bieber is Complex magazine's latest cover star.


    The 21-year-old, who was photographed by David Black for the mag, opens up about everything from his infamous arrest in Miami to how he deals with all the critics. 



    Speaking about that time he urinated in a bucket at a club, the Biebs said, "Honestly, I think the pissing in the bucket wasn’t as big as people made it seem. Just because, dude, think about it. Imagine, you hear that fucking Ozzy Osbourne pisses backstage. Immediately, 'Oh, he’s a freaking rock star!' As soon as I do it, 'He’s being a brat.'" 


    He continued, "Dude, what is bratty about pissing in a bucket? I had to go piss -- we all have to pee." He has a point -- we all do have to pee, but at least most of us have the decency to do it in a restroom, even if said restroom is on the opposite side of where we are. 


    The singer also called out the Miami police (who arrested and charged him for DUI and drag racing last year), saying, "they just wanted press."


    "I never was speeding; I never was drag racing ... The cop supposedly wanted to be famous for arresting celebrities, and someone had heard him say that prior to that," he said. "He was like, 'Put your hands on the hood!' I was like, what? I lifted my hands and I was like, 'What do you mean, what’s going on?' He was like, “I told you, put your hands on the hood! Now you’re under arrest for resisting arrest!'" 


    "I felt it, dude. I was just like, Oh, they're trying to get me right now at any cost. I went in, and I'm telling you, that 24 hours sucked. It was really cold. That was the worst part." Poor Biebs.


    To read the whole interview, head over to Complex


     


    Also on HuffPost:



    For a constant stream of entertainment news and discussion, follow HuffPost Entertainment on Viber.

    -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.


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    John Stamos is giving an inappropriately public apology on stage. The actor isn’t apologizing for something he did, it’s his character Jimmy Martino who is asking for forgiveness on the set of “Grandfathered.”  


    In the new Fox comedy, Martino, a lifelong bachelor and restaurateur, learns he has a son, Gerald (Josh Peck, “Drake & Josh”), and a granddaughter named Edie. As Jimmy struggles to find his place in their lives, he’ll not only encounter Gerald’s mother, Sara Kinglsey (Paget Brewster, "Criminal Minds"), but also Edie’s protective mother, Vanessa (Christina Milian). 


    The Huffington Post visited the set of the show in August while Stamos and company were filming the party scene for Edie's 2nd birthday, which takes place in Stamos' character's restaurant. 


    As Stamos finishes his awkward yet heartfelt speech on set, Milian, who is making a return to network television, spoke to The Huffington Post about making her own rules with this new role and how being a TV mother comes with its own set of struggles.



    But first, Milian explained to HuffPost why the party decorations on the Los Angeles set seemed more appropriate for a celebrity gathering than a 2-year-old.


    “Basically John’s character is trying to make up for lost time,” Milian said. "He doesn’t necessarily know how to do it, much less know how to be a father yet. He’s just learning the ins and outs -- and sometimes you gotta do things your way to be comfortable.”


    Those feelings are familiar to Milian. The 34-year-old star has spent more than two years mainly on the reality television circuit: briefly working as a social correspondent for “The Voice,” participating on “Dancing With The Stars” and starring in her own E! reality series “Christina Milian Turned Up.”


    “Some people were worried about me doing reality type stuff because they were like ‘then you can’t come back over to the other side,’” Milian said. “And I’m like that’s such traditional thinking.”


    “I don’t want to become just a reality star and I always believe you can make your own rules,” she added. “I’m sure there are other people who have done acting and reality at the same time. If they haven’t, then I guess I would be the first. I would like to be able to prove that it can be done." 



    I have a lot of things going on in my life too, I don’t know if it’s a hot mess but it’s all very focused, I guess that’s what happens when you hit your 30s.”



     


    On screen, her character is a twenty-something mother who gets pregnant after a one-night stand with Gerald, someone she considers a good friend. But his unrequited love for Vanessa only complicates things further.


    “There’s all these fun elements of Gerald still liking me and wanting to be together with me and me being like ‘oh gosh, I gotta a lot of stuff going on and I’m not really into you,’” Milian said.


    When she first heard of the role she says the casting director described Vanessa as a “hot mess” trying to figure out her life after the birth of her daughter. But what the actress admires most about her character is how determined she is to follow her personal dreams despite her circumstances. 


    “I have a lot of things going on in my life, too. I don’t know if it’s a hot mess but it’s all very focused, I guess that’s what happens when you hit your 30s,” Milian says with a laugh. “But I just read [the script] and I thought, ‘I can relate to this character.’”


    The actress says being a television mom comes with its own set of challenges, particularly since “Grandfathered” has two sets of 2-year-old twins portraying Edie, which means Milian is interacting with not one, but four, babies.



    “It’s been quite an experience because I’ve never been a mom on anything and working with kids is a whole new, not even pressure, it’s just different,” she said. “Your brain is going a mile a minute, other than your lines, you’re memorizing where you’re going to hit your mark and it’s like ‘OK, is the baby going to come to me?’”


    “My first day I got a nice warm welcoming,” she added. “My first scene, I had the most lines I’ve had in that episode and the babies were crying the whole time. We were on the beach [and] it was pretty funny, I was losing my lines. And the baby wasn’t suppose to be crying in the scene.”


    The solution, Milian reveals, has been spending a lot of off-screen time with the babies who portray Edie. She also says she's tapped into her own maternal instincts to create a believable bond with them on screen.


    “The way that I love my daughter, I’m kissing her and I’m hugging her and I’m very affectionate with her,” Milian said of her 5-year-old daughter Violet. “I want to show that. I don’t want it to feel cold. I want it to feel like it’s my baby. As a mom, I know how you are when it’s your child compared to maybe your friend’s kids -- it’s different.”


    As Vanessa, the actress says she’s excited to not only portray someone who shares her Cuban roots but is also a lot more than meets the eye. Milian thinks her character is often misunderstood, particularly by Gerald’s mother, as she tries to juggle motherhood and her dream of becoming a serious beauty blogger. 


    “Even though Vanessa is kind of everywhere she’s very protective of her child, that’s the one Latina and motherly thing that’s just a given,” Milian said. “She’s smarter than what you would think at the beginning. But as you get to know her there’s a lot of heart and there’s a lot behind her, [so] you need to kind of peel back the layers.”


     "Grandfathered" premieres Tues., Sept. 29 at 8 p.m. EDT on Fox. 


     Also on HuffPost: 


    -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.


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    If you love satirical articles from institutions like The Onion, Funny or Die News, Above Average, Reductress, Clickhole, or McSweeney's, then you owe it all to The National Lampoon, the founding fathers of fake news. Between 1970-1977, the National Lampoon was the place to get cool, edgy and dirty takes on current events. It was like "South Park" in magazine form. 


    Director Douglas Tirola's "Drunk Stoned Brilliant Dead" looks back on the early days of the Lampoon, as told by the people who lived it. Just a room full of Harvard grads (the magazine's name was a spinoff of undergraduate publication The Harvard Lampoon) brilliantly skewering the world around them, no topic was off-limits for the rag -- not even the infamous cover of a dog with a gun to its head, next to the words, "If you don't buy this magazine, we'll kill this dog."



    Members of the Lampoon would go on to become part of mainstays like "SNL," "The Simpsons," "National Lampoon's Family Vacation," "Animal House," and pretty much everything that ever inspired anybody to devote their life to comedy. If you haven't seen"Drunk Stoned Brilliant Dead," I recommend seeing it as soon as possible.


    I had the honor of sitting down with Sean Kelly, editor of The National Lampoon 1971-77; Mike Reiss, Lampoon writer and original staff on "The Simpsons"; and Tirola to talk about the Lampoon's writing process, the backlash they received, and whether or not the Lampoon would survive in today's culture.


    You guys are the godfathers of what I do now (funny topical articles). If you had three tenets that needed to get hit in each article, what were they?


    Sean Kelly: Well, a thing that we always did, tried to do, which is the difference between a Lampoon piece and an Onion piece ... A lot of that stuff is downhill from the premise. The headline is hilarious and then it is simply executed. Which means they took it out back and shot it [Laughs]. The idea of a Lampoon piece was that you got this setup, which is funny, and then it went somewhere you didn’t think it was going to go. So you thought it was political and it turned out to be sexual. Or you thought it was sexual and it turned out to be economical. And what started out as a dead-on parody now suddenly has implications. So we did try to do that. Which is not simply go: "What if Nixon was pooping?" but "What is he pooping?"


    Mike Reiss: I remember one of my favorite articles was called “Tales from the South.” It was a horror comic set in the south. That’s a great enough premise: The Deep South is just like a haunted house. Just a place of horrors.


    SK: It’s an American gothic! A parody of the "Tales From The Crypt." But the “Crypt Keeper” was Colonel Sanders, [Laughs] which gave it a certain weirdness. And it turned out that, of course, they were serving "Southern Pride Negro." But it wasn’t punched. That was actually going on! 


    MR: It was the story of George Wallace, the [then] governor of Alabama, told as a horror story. But it was just the guy! It was his actual life story. He was a governor and here he is being painted as something only Edgar Allen Poe could write.




    You guys have probably been asked this: Could the Lampoon survive in today’s climate? Would it be immediately thrown away or do you think it was so good, people would still see the irony?


    MR: Well it’s a magazine, which nobody reads.


    Haha, yes!


    MR: I was at the [film] premiere the other night. And the older people in the audience are loving it. And there were a lot of young New York hipsters who just seemed uneasy. And it was this amazing case where here’s political correctness, I'm seeing it face-to-face. The younger crowd is not as liberal or as hip as older people.


    SK: Yeats has a poem about youth restraining reckless middle age. And that piece in The Atlantic about how stand-up comics wont go to play colleges anymore. The idea that [Jerry] Seinfeld is too edgy is just … I mean, really? The piece said they're not personally offended. They believe in free speech. But somebody might be. Ya know, what if a one-eyed hunchback dwarf heard a joke like that? He might get offended.


    They’ll get offended for other people.


    Douglas Tirola: I know exactly what Mike’s talking about in the theater. There were so many people acting nervous, as if somebody from Human Resources was gonna pop out and say, “You laugh at that joke and your career is over!” I think part of it is that people don’t come with as much information as they used to. So they might not understand certain things. Whereas somebody who was in their 20s during the 1970’s would have common knowledge about what was happening in their 30s, 40s, 50s ... I don’t think people now have that information. The other part of it is also there is so much emphasis on how much money you make, and that being how you’re judged. So showing that you get this humor doesn’t have that much value as it used to. And being in on that joke is maybe a bad thing as opposed to a good thing. In the era of the Lampoon, you wanted to be in on that joke, and it would show that you got something. In the movie, we say that the magazines you get use to mean something.


    SK: There was a thing that was very much in the spirit of the lampoon which was a British show called “Spitting Image.” It was a huge success in England. It was a puppet show but the puppets were these brilliant caricatures of British political figures. They tried to bring it to the U.S. And it couldn’t happen in an American context, because everybody in London knows the mayor of London and has an opinion about it. But in America, the more they tried it, the more they had to have puppets of Leonard Nimoy. Because everybody knows who Leonard Nimoy is. But having a puppet of, say, Tip O’Neill?


    DT: I always get a little disappointed in "SNL," even though it’s good now. Because everything is a celebrity parody except for the beginning political thing. And I’m always like, why isn’t there more like the greek diner parody? It’s cause there isn’t that in common now. It’s just celebrities.


    MR: The Lampoon sensibility is still alive with "Family Guy" and "South Park." And I cite those things because they are both funny and shocking. And, luckily, they’re more funny than shocking. And I don’t think "The Simpsons" goes there like those two shows go there. 




    What was the peak of the Lampoon backlash? Were your lives threatened?


    SK: Dynamite was sent to Michael O’Donoghue’s office once. But nothing happened. It was just some old sticks of dynamite. The backlash. See, Charlie Hebdo didn’t carry ads. So if they had carried ads, people would’ve forced their advertisers to withdraw their advertising and the boys would be alive today. That’s where you’re vulnerable. So we were endlessly having advertisers pulling their support because they were offended or somebody wrote a letter. The blacklash was, “I will take your money away from you!” But if we didn’t have advertising, I guess they would’ve come in and shot us!


    MR: They had a full-page of Rod Stewart singing into the microphone and the microphone was ejaculate. On the very same page was an ad for Panasonic. That’s an advertiser we lost.


    SK: One of the rules was no cancer jokes, because of cigarette advertising. You know, the terrible story of why Rolling Stone and National Lampoon got off the ground? It was because there was a rule against advertising tobacco products on TV. So the tobacco companies have this enormous advertising budget, and they want young people, but they can’t get on TV. So they said, “Hey, Rolling Stone, National Lampoon!” That was who we could always count on. But the rule was no cancer jokes. But, of course, what we immediately did was innumerable cancer jokes. Cancer care products. With the advice “Kids, if it’s cancer -- don’t answer.” Then the advertising guys would come in and say, "Stop it," but then we said, “Where do we stop?”




    What do you guys think are the most Lampoon-y things right now?


    SK: Amy Schumer.


    DT: I’d say Amy Schumer and "Trainwreck." I’d say "Simpsons," "South Park," "Family Guy." And there are moments of "SNL." When you look at a certain time period and it’s all great. It’s just a matter of: are you a Sean Connery guy or a Roger Moore guy? Some people think Pierce Brosnan is the best James Bond. It’s just different times. So it’s all good. The influence is out there. Even if some people don’t know it because they’re getting it one generation behind.


    "Drunk Stoned Brilliant Dead" is in theaters and available via iTunes now. 


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    Kate Hudson and Nick Jonas are single and ready to mingle. The 23-year-old "Jealous" singer and 36-year-old actress were spotted out and about in Florida this past weekend. 


    According to TMZ, the two were seen at Disney World and later at a brunch in Miami. Hudson was also in the crowd when Jonas performed at the House of Blues in Orlando on Saturday night. 





    Jonas recently split from former Miss Universe Olivia Culpo in June and was previously linked to Kendall Jenner (though rumors of the two dating were false).


    Hudson split from Muse frontman Matt Bellamy last year, ending a three-year engagement. The two share one child together, Bingham "Bing" Hawn





    While there's no word on how Jonas and Hudson met or if they're even together, Hudson Instagrammed a photo of her brother and Jonas together in a promo photo for Fox's "Scream Queens," along with the rest of the cast. Hudson gave her brother, Oliver Hudson, a shoutout and made no mention of Jonas. 



    Reps for the two stars were unavailable for comment at time of publication. To see more photos of the two, head over to TMZ.


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    Jamie Lee Curtis is one of the most successful actresses working today, but she didn't get here without facing a few obstacles first. 


    In an interview with Entertainment Weekly's Jess Cagle, the actress admits that following the release of the classic horror film "Halloween," she wasn't getting as much work as she'd hoped for


    When asked about her appearance on the show "The Love Boat," Curtis provided an explanation as to how she landed the role (which just so happened to be alongside her mother, Janet Leigh). 


    "Here's what happened with 'The Love Boat,'" she said. "'Halloween' had come out -- big hit. You would think maybe I'd get a job. Nothing. Nothing. Here's what I got after 'Halloween:' 'Love Boat' with my mother. Playing my mother's daughter, where I wear pigtails and a bathing suit on an episode of 'Love Boat.'" 


    She goes on to say, "That's why John Carpenter wrote 'The Fog,' and gave me that part. He was like, 'I don't get it. Why aren't people hiring you?'" 


    Now, Curtis said, "it's all good." Since appearing in "The Fog," the actress starred in plenty of other films, including "True Lies" with Arnold Schwarzenegger. Curtis couldn't help but gush about the former California governor, calling him a "great guy."


    To listen to her whole interview, just watch the video below.




     


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    Matt Damon made the summer hotter when he debuted a ponytail back in June while promoting his film "The Great Wall" in China. Let's take a look back.




    The hunky new look came courtesy of hundreds of hair extensions that the star eventually removed, but that did not deter the Twitterverse from giving it the credit it deserved.


    On Friday's "Graham Norton Show," Norton decided to share some tweets of lust written in honor of Damon's hairstyle. One particular tweet that involved a "lady sandwich" left him speechless. 




     


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    Washington Wizards star John Wall is helping homeless children by donating $400,000 to a charity that serves kids whose families are in shelters or transitional housing. 


    Bright Beginnings, which provides childcare and educational services for around 162 kids each day, made an announcement about the donation on its Facebook page Friday.


    “Support from individuals like Mr. Wall, gives Bright Beginnings the encouragement to continue to provide comprehensive services for homeless children in the District of Columbia,” Betty Jo Gaines, the organization's executive director, said in the statement. “It is evident that John Wall is sensitive and concerned about the plight of homeless children in D.C. and he wants these children to succeed.”


    The center, which focuses on kids preschool-age and younger, hopes to open a second child development center that would serve an additional 100 children, according to the Washington City Paper. The donation, which Wall made via the John Wall Family Foundation, will help the center achieve that goal.


    In addition to the generous donation, the point guard also a hosted two half-day-long youth basketball camps in Potamac, Maryland, this past weekend. Last year, SB Nation praised the player’s philanthropic work, noting that he donated $1 million to D.C. charities in 2013 and has partnered with the Boys & Girls clubs of Greater Washington to promote education for young people.


    Contact the author of this article at Hilary.Hanson@huffingonpost.com.


     


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    Last week, "Real Housewives of Atlanta" star Kim Zolciak revealed she had a transient ischemic attack, or "mini stroke," following a performance on "Dancing with the Stars." 


    The 37-year-old had shared a photo from her hospital bed on Instagram with a lengthy caption.



    The last 24hrs have been [a] whirlwind! I landed yesterday morning from LAX (took the red eye right after DWTS) I got home and within minutes suffered a TIA (mini stroke) the left side of my body went completely numb and my speech was gone. Extremely grateful for @sladeosborne @briellebiermann @nikitpressley @kroybiermann for quick reactions! I have 100% of my feeling back THANK GOD. Still in the hospital but I just know I'm getting released today! #CrazyAgeDoesntMatter.  




    While fans and followers shared their support in the comments,TV personality Wendy Williams and celebrity gossip website Naughty Gossip were busy accusing the reality star of faking the whole thing as a way to gain more votes on "DWTS." 


    Zolciak took to social media to hit back at her haters, calling them "appalling" and "disgusting." 






    Haters gonna hate.  


    Zolciak, who was released from the hospital on Friday, is recovering at home with her family. She has since regained her movement and speech, but according to TMZ she hasn't received clearance to return to "DWTS" just yet. 


     


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    A conversation about fat-shaming turned into Raven-Symoné claiming she was forced to wear a fat suit when she starred on the ABC Family series "State of Georgia." 


    On Monday, "The View" co-host revealed that when she dropped some weight a few years back it had a surprising effect on her career. 


    "I feel when I lost my weight, like big-girl season came. There's so many big girls that are now famous. That was over here, starving," she said, prompting fellow co-host Whoopi Goldberg to chime in: "You were famous. You were a big girl and you were famous." 


    "You don't even know what I went through," Symoné responded. "I wouldn't get my show unless I looked a certain way, things of that nature." 


    Goldberg tried to convince the 29-year-old that she did understand revealing that when she lost weight six or seven years ago, her new look wasn't what producers were looking for. 


     "They did that to me! On 'State of Georgia' they had me wear a fat suit," she shot back. "Because they said I wasn't the size they wanted me to be."




    Symoné, who starred on the ABC Family show for one season, had previously opened up to Oprah Winfrey about the producers who had pressured her to lose weight, despite the fact she'd rather be "thick and fabulous."


    "I lost weight to keep them people from talking to me. I got tired and irritated," she said. "I was proud at the time. I was. And I am. I love my thicky, thicky self. But now that I lost weight, it's like, 'OK, wait, let me go back in the gym and get it together.'"


    Similar to comments she made on "The View" on Monday, Symoné told Winfrey she felt that once she slimmed down, she though her previous body type became more accepted in Hollywood. 


    "As soon as I lost weight, it became thick-girl season. Everyone just started to be thick on television," she said. "I'm like, are they getting the same backlash as I am? Because I was thick."


    The Huffington Post's request for comment from ABC Family has yet to be returned at this time. 


     


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