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Celebrity news and blog articles from The Huffington Post

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    Viola Davis made history at Sunday night's Emmy Awards when she became the first black woman to take home the Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama Series trophy. Her acceptance speech, which touched upon the lack of opportunity for women of color, was poignant, emotional and empowering.


    So it's a serious wonder why "General Hospital" actress Nancy Lee Grahn used that moment to criticize Davis





    "Im a f**king actress for 40 yrs. None of us get respect or opportunity we deserve. Emmys not venue 4 racial opportunity. ALL women belittled," she wrote in a since-deleted tweet captured by BuzzFeed. 





    She also took issue with Davis quoting Harriet Tubman ("In my dreams, I see a line. Over that line, I see green fields and lovely flowers and beautiful white women with their arms stretched out to me over that line, but I can't seem to get there no how, I can't seem to get over that line").  














    After receiving backlash for her comments, Grahn attempted to apologize and respond to her critics. 














    She wrote a lengthier response in an extended tweet



    I apologize for my earlier tweets and now realize I need to check my own privilege. My intention was not to take this historic and important moment from Viola Davis or other women of color but I realize that my intention doesn't matter here because that is what I ended up doing. I learned a lot tonight and I admit that there are still some things I don't understand but I am trying to and will let this be a learning experience for me.






    Ugh. 


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    As is often the case, the best view of the 2015 Emmy Awards could be found on Instagram. From Ricky Gervais's selfie to Lady Gaga and Hari Nef, here are our favorite candid moments.



    More from Vogue:

    Kevin Love Attends His First Fashion Show, Looks Great in a Suit

    Amy Schumer's Shout-Out to Her Makeup Artist in Her Emmys Acceptance Speech Is One More Reason to Love Her

    The Best Hourglass Bodies of All Time: From Raquel Welch to Beyoncé

    Move Over Blake Lively: Meet the New Role Model for Red Carpet Pregnancy Style

    Are Awards Shows Finally Getting Serious About Older Women in Hollywood?

    -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.












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    Monday morning.


    People thinking about the mountain of work ahead of them.


    Or the exact location of Kit Harington.


    Or thigh-brows.


    I can't stop thinking about her. About Friday night.


    I hooked up (twice) with Miss Piggy over the weekend. It's the happiest I've been in years. And sure, she's a pig. But she does people things, like acting in movies and getting jealous. She's obviously not a pig like the pigs we eat. I mean, last I checked, people wear dresses and karate-chop their enemies. So, no, I don't feel bad for taking a pig out for adult drinks.


    The only thing that makes me feel bad is that Miss Piggy thinks it was a harmless hook-up. And that she's still hung up on her frog ex-boyfriend, Kermit. I have to deal with that. I'm not mad. Just disappointed.


    Everybody knows that Miss Piggy just got out of a very long relationship. And everybody knows that her ex is already seeing somebody new. So of course her emotions are raw, and she's entitled to go out and hook up with dudes.


    I've just never been a rebound. I'm usually the boyfriend. Or whatever it's called when you get nothing and you just go home to watch "Seinfeld."



    Miss Piggy and I had been texting a lot toward the end of her breakup. I'm not proud of secretly flirting with a pig-woman with a boyfriend, but I never met Kermit so I didn't care about his feelings. If I'm being totally honest, I think Kermit's a coward and a loser and I was happy to take his girl. He's obviously not good enough for Miss Piggy and he has no problem parading his younger pig around even though he knows it hurts Miss Piggy. Asshole tries to pretend like that's an OK thing to do and he's just this neurotic sweetheart. He's not. And if I had it my way, Kermit would get eaten by a snake.


    Anyway, Miss Piggy was feeling vulnerable about Kermit moving on so fast. So we met up at Night of Joy in Brooklyn. Great cocktails. Never gets crowded. Groovy tunes.


    We had many tequilas and eventually started talking about whether this new pig, Denise, was hotter than Miss Piggy. I assured her that Denise is hot garbage. I told Miss Piggy, "You're a catch! Any guy would be down to clown any time you wanted!" I told her that I totally would. I told her I think about it all the time. In the shower. On dates with other people. Most of the time, really. I told Miss Piggy that when I need a reason to get out of bed in the morning, I think about what it would be like to have sex with her on a hammock on Muppet Treasure Island.


    That's when I knew I had probably weirded her out.


    Maybe it was the sexy lighting. Maybe the Cuervo. But instead of storming out, she put her hoof on my hand and gently rolled it around. It's hard for pigs to hold things like people. Then she nudged her hoof underneath my hand. I looked up and we locked eyes.


    John Trowbridge: "You're amazing."


    Miss Piggy: "Who? Moi?"


    Friendship be DAMNED! We Uber'd it back to my place. Out of respect for Miss Piggy, I wont go into too much detail about what happened next. But I will say this: I'm never having sex with a human woman again.


    The next morning, I woke up to her staring in my eyes. Then we had sex again (for way longer).


    Then I got up to shower, discovering she had left my place when I returned from the bathroom.





    We haven't spoken since.


    Realistically, it wasn't going to work for many reasons. She's a cultural icon, and I'm just a comedy writer for The Huffington Post. Another big reason is that Miss Piggy is actually a pig-puppet controlled by a human person that I've never exchanged words with. Not a talking pig. I think I should've said that earlier. That's a huge element to this story that deserves a lot more attention. It's the main reason, actually. And it makes a lot more sense than me falling for a talking pig. A lot of expensive equipment was stolen from my apartment and I know that Miss Piggy couldn't lift it by herself. I assume it was the person who was controlling the Miss Piggy puppet. I guess I let all this happen because I wanted to believe that Miss Piggy was a real person who had feelings for me. I'm so embarrassed that I bought $55 dollars worth of drinks for a random person with their hand inside an expensive sock.


    Well, I guess that's just what I get for falling in love. If I've learned anything from this experience, it's this: You love what you love -- not what loves you back.


    If you've ever been made a rebound, please leave your experience in the comments. As always, I promise to respond to each and every one of them. You're not alone.


    Also on HuffPost:



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    John Stamos has returned to TV with a new sitcom and, in an interview with Details, the 52-year-old isn't holding anything back. 


    Stamos, whose new show "Grandfathered" premieres on Sept. 29, claimed that Ryan Murphy originally wrote "Nip/Tuck" for him, but his former wife Rebecca Romijn stopped him from taking one of the two lead roles of sex-obsessed plastic surgeons that ultimately went to Dylan Walsh and Julian McMahon. 


    "[Murphy] wanted to do three male hookers, like 'Charlie's Angels,' who'd go in and save relationships by having sex with the husband and the wife," he told the magazine when asked if rumors that the showrunner tried to cast him as a prostitute when "Full House" wrapped were true.


    Stamos added, "Maybe I was too afraid then. Ryan also wrote 'Nip/Tuck' for me, but the person with whom I was in a relationship at the time read the script and said, 'That's demeaning toward women.' I'm not with her anymore."


    While Stamos doesn't mention his ex-wife by name, it's clear that he's talking about the model, to whom he was married from 1998 to 2005 -- which overlaps with the 2003 premiere of the FX series. 


    Stamos also opened up about the monthlong stint in rehab he completed in July, following his DUI arrest and hospitalization in June.


    "You know, I've had a rough year with my mom dying, so it all came to a head, and it was a turning point. You either continue on that path -- and some of it's fun, but a lot of it's not -- or there's this other thing, this golden opportunity sitting there with all this work and all this goodwill that you have going for you," he told Details. "That's the key. I feel better than I've felt in a decade."


    For more with Stamos, including his feelings on forever being known as Uncle Jesse, head over to Details


     


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    Amanda Peet and her husband David Benioff looked like they were having the best time celebrating the various "Game of Thrones" wins at Sunday night's Emmy Awards. 


    Peet and Benioff were photographed hanging out with actor Pedro Pascal at the Plaza at the Pacific Design Center after the show. "Game of Thrones" won for Outstanding Drama Series and made history that night, so it makes sense that there was a lot to be happy about. 


    #RelationshipGoals 






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    Last night's Emmy Awards show was full of amazing moments, but the moment was when Viola Davis took the stage to accept her Outstanding Lead Actress Drama award.


    There were many things that made her win so profound. It was Davis's first Emmy win, ever (bringing her one step closer to EGOT status). But more importantly, Davis made history, becoming the first black woman to win a lead actress drama award at the Emmys. 


    Davis's win was the culmination of an evening full of #BlackGirlMagic. It began on the red carpet, where black women like Laverne Cox, Angela Bassett, Danielle Brooks, Queen Latifah, Uzo Aduba, and Teyonah Parris slayed in floor-length gowns. It continued when Regina King shared a warm sisterly embrace with presenter Taraji P. Henson upon winning her supporting actress award, her first Emmy ever in the course of a stellar and underrated acting career that began on the 1985  sitcom "227." 


    When Uzo Aduba won her Outstanding Supporting Actress Comedy award and said she loved her team because "you let me be me,” that was black girl magic. When an Ava Duvernay-directed Apple music ad featuring Henson, Kerry Washington, and Mary J. Blige jamming to old school hits aired during commercial breaks, that was black girl magic. When Andy Samberg and Seth Meyers declared Shonda Rhimes the "Greatest Boss in the World," that was black girl magic. 




    And then there was Viola Davis's acceptance speech, moving and powerful and unapologetic in a way only she could master. Before she even got to the stage, she shared a hug with Henson, the other black woman nominated in the lead actress category (two black woman being nominated in this category is unprecedented), and in their embrace was an obvious common understanding about the importance of the moment: The fact that it was so much bigger than them.  




    In just a few brief, but eloquent words Davis was able to convey that importance. She used her moment and her platform to powerfully speak to the realities of being a black woman in Hollywood, sating, "The only thing that separates women of color from anyone else is opportunity. You cannot win an Emmy for a role that isn't there." 


    But what made Davis's speech such an exuberant reflection of black sisterhood and solidarity was the fact that she also gave honor to not only "How to Get Away With Murder" creator Shonda Rhimes, but also all the black women on television who are changing what it means "to be beautiful, to be sexy, to be a leading woman, to be black." 


    "And to the Taraji P Hensons and Kerry Washingtons, the Halle Berrys, the Nicole Beharies, the Meagan Goods, to Gabrielle Union. Thank you for taking us over that line." 









    Davis's words were the catalyst for an avalanche of praise and solidarity from fellow black actresses and creators. As "Sleepy Hollow" star Nicole Beharie later pointed out on Twitter, Davis didn't have to mention the other black female leads on television in her speech. She could have made the moment solely about her own triumph, her own success. By including these other actresses, she was acknowledging a special, sacred sisterhood. 


    Last night's Emmy's were a prime example of what support amongst black women looks like. Davis's words were not created to exclude (as actress Nancy Lee Grahn seemed to think), but simply to highlight the obstacles she and her fellow black actresses have faced while also celebrating the strides black women have made in television and film thus far. And yes, her words were a kind of magic, speaking into existence a future in which more women who look like her will also one day get the opportunity to stand on that stage.  


    And, just a quick reminder:



    Also on Huffpost:


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    Imagine listening to vinyls all day with one of the greatest guitarists of our time. That's what filmmaker Morgan Neville ("Twenty Feet from Stardom") did for a sit-down interview with Keith Richards, which eventually grew into an unexpected full-length documentary.


    In "Keith Richards: Under the Influence," which made its world premiere at the Toronto International Film Festival last week, Neville explores the many musical inspirations behind the latest solo album from The Rolling Stones guitarist. On "Crosseyed Heart," his first solo record in two decades, Richards fluctuates from bluesy rock and roll to country to reggae. Beyond uncovering the sonic roots behind Richards' songs, Neville captures the essence of the songwriter and guitarist in his film, revealing the musician that's so laid back and cool "you want him to be your dad," as Neville said.


    From Richards' bumbling recollections of famous Stones recording sessions to the time Chuck Berry punched him in the face to his profound love of all music, "Under the Influence" shows us more of the legend behind the cigarette and bandana. We caught up with the Oscar-winning director over the phone to hear about his time with Richards and the spontaneity behind the making of the film.


    How awesome was it to hang out with Keith Richards?


    If I told my 14-year-old self that I’d be hanging out with Keith Richards talking about records, my head would’ve exploded.


    What was the original idea behind making this doc?


    First of all, it was most definitely not supposed to be a film. I got a call from [Richards'] manager, Jane. She wanted to know if I wanted to interview him to have something to go around the new album. [...] Then I heard the record and it had all these different influences. I came up with this idea that I’d show up at his house with a pile of vinyl and a turntable, and that we would just talk about all of these different influences in his life. He came in and immediately started going through the records. It was George Jones, Lightning Hopkins, Johnny Cash, Loretta Lynn, The Flying Burrito Brothers. He started playing songs and we had this amazing three hour interview. At the end, Jane said, "God, that was great. Keith had a great time. We should keep filming. But we’re not going to make a documentary." So it was just one of those things where we kept going. [...] The edit was going so well that it somehow became a feature length. 



    So in a way, having made many films that have taken me years at a time, this was like raw, intuitive rock ‘n’ roll filmmaking. [...] To me it was just about capturing the essence of Keith today, what it would be like to sit around to talk about life and music with him. The Keith that’s in the film is exactly who I think he is. He’s somebody who kind of doesn’t give a shit about what anybody thinks. He’s so comfortable in his own skin and so willing to talk about anything. I find that kind of admirable. I wish I didn’t care about what people thought as much as Keith Richards doesn’t care. 


    There's moments in the film where he recalls stories about the Stones. Did those come up naturally or did you ask him about them?


    He brought it up. He was talking about doing the new album and Steve Jordan, who produced the new album, had brought up Keith’s process on some of his older Stones records. And of course we’re all Stones fans. It’s interesting because one of the things people forget about Keith Richards is he’s one of the greatest songwriters of the 20th century. You think of him as the icon or persona with shades and a cig looking half stoned, then you remember, "Oh, he’s one half of one of the greatest songwriting teams of all time." If you actually go back through the Stones’ catalogue, which I have, and listen to "Can’t You Hear Me Knocking" and "Wild Horses" and "Under My Thumb” and on and on and on -- he actually wrote all these songs. You forget that.


    You interviewed him for your Muddy Waters doc, “Can’t Be Satisfied,” and you also worked with him on “Crossfire Hurricane.” Was there any difference between him then compared to now?


    Sure. I think it made it a little easier for me because I was less intimidated. I don’t think it made any difference to him, because he’s never intimidated by anything. But I will say, "Can’t Be Satisfied," it was 2002 maybe, and he was great then, but he seems much happier and much sharper now than then. It’s funny. [He's] even more intelligible, because he has a very unique way of speaking. I remember that interview from "Can’t Be Satisfied," I could understand about 50 percent of what he said, and on this film I could understand 80 to 85 percent of what he said. I don’t know what the difference was. He just seemed a little more present now. Someone like Keith Richards is supposed to have died 40 years ago; he seems remarkably in a good place. [...] When he was young, he seemed like an old soul and now that he’s older he seems oddly youthful.



    Do you think that has anything to do with him going solo again now?


    I don’t, because he always says his first love’s the Stones and even though he’s doing solo stuff, he was on tour with the Stones this summer and they’re going on tour in the spring. He loves that and he really loves working with the Stones. I think in a way just doing music is what makes him happy. I think five years ago, six years ago when the Stones stopped touring, he wrote the book, he and Mick weren’t talking, it seemed like the Stones may never happen again and I think that’s the moment he was considering retiring. I don’t think he picked up a guitar for months. I think getting back to the music is the thing that nurtures him. I kind of think of music as his religion. It’s like the one thing that’s always consistent in his life that never betrays him, that gives him nourishment. He’s told me this -- the further he gets away from music, the more of the real world bullshit he has to deal with. But when he gets to be on stage or the studio or be writing a song,  is when he’s happiest.


    Near the end of the film, Keith says, "My idea of heaven is to be a rock ‘n’ roller nobody ever sees. To be anonymous." Did you see this desire for anonymity come out in his personality?


    Yeah, absolutely. It’s funny because when we were shooting in a tiny studio in New York, I said to Jane, "Does Keith want a another room for him or some place where he can get away?" And she said, "No, no. He wants to be in the mix with everybody." And it was a small studio and there was a little green room for everybody including our crew and the musicians and producers and engineers. There was one night where we had a pile of pizza and there was beer and soda. There was like 20 of us jammed inside this tiny room, everybody’s eating and laughing. Keith’s sitting on the couch with four people just as one of the guys. And I looked over at him and he was so happy. I think to be him and to be in a situation where he’s not the center of attention, where he can just be one of the guys, it makes him really happy because he doesn’t get that experience very often. He steps out on the street and he gets accosted. He’s one of the most famous people around. That’s got to be a burden, and for somebody who’s not even the lead singer. I think his heroes are the side men. We talked about Scotty Moore and James Burton and Jimmy Johnson and those were guys like him, the guys behind Elvis or Otis Redding. 


    What's the benefit of this doc being available on Netflix instead of in theaters?


    Like I said, this film was such a fast, raw, instinctual rock and roll experience. To be able to just do it and then just have it out in the world like that, it kind of matches the pace of how we made the film. We didn’t overthink anything with this film, hopefully, maybe under thunk it, but it was just trying to do something fast that captured an energy and throw it out there in the world. In a way Netflix was the perfect place for it because I don’t have to do interviews about it for two years. It’s a snapshot of a moment in time and it’s great and we can share it with the world and go on to the next snapshot.


    This interview has been edited and condensed.


    "Keith Richards: Under the Influence" is now streaming on Netflix.


     


    Also on HuffPost: 


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    I'm going to 'fess up to something that may sound strange coming from a 41-year-old woman: In the course of my recent divorce, I developed an affinity for Taylor Swift -- and I think she actually helped me weather the demise of my marriage.

    How did a stranger half my age help see me through the toughest time in my life?

    1. She's given the cat lady thing cred.

    Okay, I'd personally be more of a crazy dog lady, but any young superstar who openly admits she's happy to hang out with her cats and bake cookies -- thereby rendering such things cool -- has to be a kindred spirit. That Dr. Meredith Grey and Detective Olivia Benson (yep, Swift's feline friends even have the coolest of names) are more well-traveled than I am has only been a source of inspiration for me. I'm getting my passport -- and my pup --ready to roll.

    2015-09-18-1442537957-1384709-TaylorSwiftCarryingHerCatNYC.jpg

    Photo credit: Pacific Coast News Online

    2. She's got the #GirlSquad going on.

    When she's not cuddling cats or baking cookies, she's busy being seriously badass with the most uber-ambitious group of gal pals ever. And if there's one thing I learned from my divorce, it's that you're sunk without a few good, strong, forward-thinking women who've got your back. My friends and I may roll more Bota-box-on-the-beach than star-studded-Bad-Blood-video, but I think the concept's the same: Grab your girlfriends and hold each other up.

    2015-09-18-1442538118-5013542-bad_blood1.jpg
    Photo credit: Independent UK

    3. She BBQs poolside in my home state of Little Rhody.

    I swear living in coastal Rhode Island made my divorce easier to take. From a biomedical standpoint, my grandmother might have been wrong when she told me salt water heals all wounds. But from an emotional stance? She was spot on. Ms. Swift clearly gets this. When you can sink your toes in the sand, or paddle board along the rocky shoreline, the rest of the world seems light years away. And though I don't have to worry about paparazzi quite the way my superstar neighbor does, we all have things we need to escape.

    2015-09-18-1442581398-2822814-1435934905_calvinharristaylorswiftbbq.jpg
    Photo credit: Calvin Harris via Instagram

    4. She's got the right take on breakups.

    How old is Taylor Swift again? She gets it, this brutal breakup stuff. There really is a point when you have to stop trying to make a broken relationship work. Stop with the late night texts and "I miss you" calls. Stop dripping snot onto your wedding photos while marinating in Chardonnay (OK, yeah -- that's more me than T. Swift). And start dancing around your living room -- preferably in cute pajamas and hipster glasses -- while affirming at the top of your lungs that we are never, ever, ever getting back together.

    2015-09-18-1442581505-6688993-TaylorSwiftVideo_620_100312.jpg


    5. She's got the right take on life in general.

    "Haters gonna hate." There's nothing quite like a divorce to teach you that lesson. Friends and family choose sides. People say things about you that are maddeningly untrue. You have no choice but to "shake it off." And then, if you're at all like Ms. Swift, you get back to baking cookies and wrapping presents and surprising strangers with acts of kindness. Because the world needs more of that stuff.

    2015-09-18-1442582883-7684793-Taylor_Swift_ShakeItOff.png.CROP.promovarmediumlarge.png


    6. She understands the power of red.

    If all else fails, apply red lipstick. It won't fix a single thing in the world, but it will make you feel bold enough to change it all.

    2015-09-18-1442582252-6089285-tswiftred.jpg

    Photo credit: Hollywood Life

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    Many of us would like to erase from our memories the fact that Ryan Reynolds ever played the Green Lantern and that the 2011 superhero film existed at all. But Reynolds, who swaps the green suit for the red suit this year in the highly anticipated "Deadpool" doesn't have any regrets.


    "If I had to do it all again, I’d do the exact same thing," the actor told GQ in their October cover story talking about his career, fatherhood and how difficult the industry can be for minorities and women in Hollywood. When asked how he'd feel if the critically panned and box-office failure that was "Green Lantern" had actually been successful, Reynolds said he's already pretty content with how things went. 


    "I mean, I don’t give a rusty f**k," he said, "because -- I know that this is gonna sound like some sort of guy who’s spent a little bit of time in a monastery or something, but it all led to here." Reynolds previously told Yahoo that he never read the script when he auditioned for the DC Comics character, but that he still looks at "Green Lantern" as "an opportunity of a lifetime." While he knows that the movie could've opened up different opportunities had it performed better, he's appreciative of where it's gotten him now, which is the ideal time for "Deadpool."


    In the upcoming R-rated movie, Reynolds plays the titular wise-cracking superhero who's not afraid to say the obvious and the obnoxious. "I think 'Deadpool' [is] coming along at the right time," Reynolds told GQ, "because it’s also speaking to that generation and that group of people that have seen them all, seen all these comic-book films and enjoyed them all to varying degrees of success. But I think it’s speaking to them as though the guy in that red suit is one of them, to some degree."


    Reynolds was able to survive the disaster of "Green Lantern," and he also has high hopes for Miles Teller re-emerging from the disappointment of the recent "Fantastic Four." (The film was ripped apart by critics so badly that its own director Josh Trank even dissed it.) But Reynolds doesn't think transitioning from blockbuster failures is as easy for minority actors, such as Michael B. Jordan -- also part of the "Fantastic Four" -- as well as women. "I know it’s not easy for a black actor. It’s not easy for a female actor," he said. Who knows, Jordan might follow Reynolds' lead and star in a good superhero film one day. Jordan for Miles Morales, anyone?


    For the full interview, head to GQ.com



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    Ryan Reynolds experienced a betrayal of a particularly hurtful kind after the birth of his daughter, James. 


    “A guy that I’d known for my whole life, one of my closest friends growing up, he had been shopping pictures of my baby around," Reynolds told GQ for the magazine's latest issue. "I kind of got in front of it, which is good. But it was a slightly dark period. A bad couple of weeks.”


    The "guy" was a close friend of Reynolds who he has known for 25 years. 


    "It was like a death. It was like one of those devastating things to find out," he said, adding that the person did it for the money and didn't think he'd get caught. "It was, like, so kind of shocking. There isn’t really a conversation to have. It’s just, ‘Oh, well, now I’m never going to see you or talk to you again, unfortunately.’ That’s kind of how it worked out.”


    Fatherhood has been a life-changer for the "Deadpool" star, who welcomed James with wife Blake Lively last December. 


    “I’ve learned that an inordinate amount of clichés are completely true,” he added. “Like, there is this kid here that I would walk through fire for. Or, maybe not fire. Like, a very hot pavement, I’d walk through. A shag rug.”


    Read more over on GQ.com




     


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    "Saturday Night Live" has just lost a handful of writers.


    According to Entertainment Weekly, Mike O'Brien has left the show as a writer, along with Nick Rutherford, Natasha Rothwell, Alison Rich and Claire Mulaney. O'Brien joined the "SNL" writing staff in 2009 and was upped to a featured player in 2013 for Season 39. O'Brien left the stage last season to return to the writer's room.


    But this doesn't necessarily mean O'Brien's talents are gone for good. As Uproxx reports, there's still the possibility that O'Brien's writing may appear on "SNL" in the form of short films. Some of the shorts O'Brien was previously credited with include "Prom Queen" and "Grow-a-Guy."


    The empty chairs in the "SNL" room have already been filled with new names, however. Splitsider reports that Season 41, which kicks off with host Miley Cyrus on Oct. 3, will feature the writing talents of Fran Gillespie, Sudi Green and Will Stephen of UCB, former "Late Show with David Letterman" writers Paul Masella and Chris Belair, as well as stand-up comedian Dave Sirus.


    Also on HuffPost: 



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    On Sunday night, the Kardashians took Armenia. Kim and Khloe's trip to the family's ancestral land was the focus of the latest episode of "Keeping Up with the Kardashians." 


    It was great to learn more about the off-brand Kardashians, i.e. their cousins Kourtni, Kara and Krista, but it was Kanye West's visit to an Armenian art school that can't be missed. 


    While touring the Tumo Center for Creative Technologies, West (who never misses an opportunity to tell someone he went to art school) revealed he has lofty goals for his wife's reality show. 


    "They’re shooting my wife’s show, and I keep on, like, asking them to shoot it like it’s Stanley Kubrick," he told one of the school's instructors. 


    It's no secret that West isn't a fan of how the reality show is shot. In fact, it's the reason he rarely makes an appearance on the E! series. 


    "I don't really do her show just because I don't particularly like the way the producers shoot some of the shots. I'm very meticulous to that, right? I'd like to get a different [director of photography] or whatever," he told New York radio station Hot 97 in 2013.  "And when we got engaged, I made sure the show was there [filming] because I felt like that was something that would make her happy. Regardless of how it was shot, I felt like this is a moment she would like to have and would like to share, and just have that documented. And we could decide later or not to air it."


    Meanwhile, West's tour of the school also revealed he's pro-robot ("That's dope, I like robots") but scared of 3D printers. 


    "This is what I'm afraid of, right here, 3D printing. The Internet destroyed the music industry, and now this is what we're afraid of with the textile industry," he told the school's managing director. "There will come a time when people are making their shoes at home." 


    Check out the clip at Gawker.  


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    Kendall Jenner might be a supermodel and reality TV star, but that doesn't mean she's not like other teens. 


    The 19-year-old opened up about her rebellious phase after her nipple piercing made headlines during New York Fashion Week. 


    “I was going through a period in my life, having a rough time, being a rebel and was like, ‘Let’s just do it,’” she told the New York Post. “[I was] so terrified, I’m laying on the bed like, ‘Why am I doing this?' Honestly, it hurt, but wasn’t as bad as everyone made it seem, and maybe because everyone hyped it up and I thought it would be really, really bad. Then it wasn’t as bad as I expected.”


    Her piercing was visible through her white gown at Harper's Bazaar ICON event last week. 




     


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    Selena Gomez took a dip in the ocean in Miami Friday, flashing some new ink on her upper thigh. 


    The 23-year-old was photographed in the water wearing a high-cut black swimsuit that revealed a possible tattoo on her left thigh. The mark is apparently the "om" symbol, which is said to clear the mind of  thoughts and distractions.


    Whether or not it's permanent is unclear. 



     


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    Robert De Niro, star of the new movie "The Intern," walked out of an interview with Radio Times journalist Emma Brockes while doing press for his new movie.


    According to Brockes' account, De Niro became upset with her line of questioning and asked Brockes to pause her recorder while he scrambled to leave.


    Apparently, De Niro took offense to the "negative" nature of the questions and ended the exchange by saying, "I'm not doing this, darling." 


    "I think you're very condescending," Brockes reportedly said during the exchange.


    "Oh, you think 'darling' is condescending?" De Niro replied. 



    According to The Independent, the 72-year-old objected to the question of how he is able to resists going into "autopilot" mode on set, followed by the observation that the New York neighborhood of Tribeca, where the actor co-founded the Tribeca Film Festival after 9/11, is now overrun by bankers. 


    "I have a lot of sympathy for the actors -- those junket schedules are brutal, as I'm sure you know," said Brockes in an email exchange with The Huffington Post. "It was a long day for everyone. I thought he was terrific in the film, and I quite admire his refusal to play the publicity game, but it does make things tricky from my end." 


    Piers Morgan once called De Niro "the hardest star to interview," and it appears the actor is living up to his reputation. We can't wait to see how the rest of the press interviews go for "The Intern." Hopefully, none of them are quite as awkward as this uncomfortable exchange. 


    H/T The Independent 


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    Mélanie Laurent has been acting in France since she was 14 years old, but most people recognize her best as Shosanna, the Jewish woman who runs, and burns down, a Paris movie theater in "Inglourious Basterds." The French actress is also well known for her roles in "Beginners," "Enemy" and "Now You See Me."


    But Laurent has also been spending time behind the camera, most recently with her second directorial feature, "Breathe" ("Respire"). 


    Based on the French novel of the same name by Anne-Sophie Brasme, "Breathe" follows Charlie (Joséphine Japy), a high school teen who gets wrapped up in a dangerous relationship with the rebellious new girl, Sarah (Lou de Laâge). Think "Blue Is the Warmest Color," without a focus on sexuality and overly saturated sex, filmed from a female perspective. 


    That's precisely what distinguishes "Breathe" from many movies about young women. In every moment, it's apparent that a woman was behind the lens and script. Laurent's film captures the powerful connection between two women -- at times perilously reliant upon each other, at other times entwined in a relationship both wonderful and rewarding -- and how easily friendly love can brew into intoxicating obsession. 


    The Huffington Post sat down with Laurent in New York to talk about "Breathe," the mission of female filmmakers, how much she didn't like the sex scenes in "Blue Is the Warmest Color," and working with Angelina Jolie and Brad Pitt in "By the Sea."


    This is the first feature you’ve directed and didn't act in. What was that transition like? 


    Lovely. I enjoyed [it] so much. I was in my first one, but I didn’t want to be in the first one, then I had to. [...] But for this one, I enjoyed [taking] a step back, and I enjoyed taking care of my actors.


    How has acting informed how you direct?


    I think we are talking the same language, so it’s obviously easier. I think the big problem is when you’re just an actor you don’t understand all the challenges of a director. And it’s the same the other way. We don’t have the same priorities, the same fears. It’s funny, when my two actresses arrived in the morning on set, I think, "OK, I know exactly what you think. You’re afraid of that line, you’re afraid of that scene. You don’t know how to play that, and it’s fine, it’s going to be fine." So it was easier. And I love directing people, but I’m directing them as I wish people can direct me. [...] I remember on “Inglourious Basterds” I was doing the scene with Daniel Brühl and Quentin [Tarantino] arrived and in my ears just said, "What if you’re mocking him?" And I was like, [gasp] "OK!" It changed the whole scene.  



    Did you give the same kind of suggestions to your actresses in this film?


    Well, it’s hard because [Quentin] is a genius. But I’m trying to be super precise and give them a lot of things. Then at the last moment I’m saying, "Forget everything I said. Just do it in your way." For example, I really don’t care if they don’t say any dialogue. I don’t care about my dialogue. I’m just like, I wrote that, the idea of the scene, then you can just do everything. I love when they’re free. I trust actors because I’m sure they have a vision of your movie.


    How much of the novel did you change in your adaptation?


    I read it when I was 17. [Brasme] was 17 [when she wrote it]. I called her and she said, "Oh please, please do the movie because we are the same age and we are on the same page. The directors I met want to make a sexual story of that and want to do something really far away from what I wrote." But I was 17, so I was too young. I was kind of like a baby, so I didn’t find any producers. And thank god, because I needed that time, I needed that distance. I needed to make short movies to be able to film [this]. Then when I wrote the script, I didn’t read the book again. I wrote the script with the memories I had of my experience when I was 17. So I changed everything, kind of. 


    What was that like, to be 17 and want to make it, but revisit it now?


    Well, that was my biggest fear. When I was 17 we didn’t have any cell phones, we didn’t have Facebook, Instagram and all that craziness. So that’s very different. I’ve met a lot of Sarahs, and I was really, definitely Charlie during years. But I just kept that tension. 



    What do you think is the benefit of making this as a female filmmaker versus how a male director might have done it?


    I think the men might have filmed maybe more kisses. [Laughs.] I don’t know, because honestly every time I’ve made a movie with, for example, Mike Mills or Tarantino, two directors who love women so much so they give us so much freedom and really amazing female parts. But when I see a woman film another woman, I feel the difference. Especially in movies with really sexual stories.


    I don’t know if you’ve seen Catherine Corsini’s "La Belle Saison" ("Summertime"). It’s a French one. She’s gay, the director, and when she films sexual moments, it’s exciting. We don’t really see anything, but you just feel it. When I see "La vie d'Adèle" ("Blue Is the Warmest Color"), that long shot of sexual, just sex and sex and sex for like 20 minutes, I feel bad for them. I don’t feel it’s exciting. I loved the movie, but I didn’t like that part.


    I just made a movie with Angelina Jolie, and I have a lot of sex scenes and I was terrified. When I saw what she did, I was like, "OK, she’s a female. She loves females." She just chose beautiful shots and she’s a female who filmed a female with lots of love and respect. There is no fantasy. Obviously, [men and women] don’t have the same vision of what is sexy. I think for us being sexy [is] just wearing a t-shirt and being sexy because you’re clever and you have no make-up and you smoke a cigarette. Maybe a guy will ask you to be like this, maybe more legs, maybe more body, when we don’t really need that to be sexy. [...] But then there’s so many amazing directors who know exactly -- I think about a lot of French directors -- Truffaut, Godard. But it’s the mystery of the woman, you know -- trench coats, cigarettes. But that would be so interesting if a woman made those films, just to see.


    Working with Angelina Jolie, did you learn anything from her as a director?


    Yeah, we talked about that a lot. That was so cool, to be able to say, “How’s the editing room?” We know exactly what that means. Even on set, she was like, “This is the frame, and you know what I mean when I say that.” 


    What do you think the film industry needs more of with regards to female filmmakers, and how do you want to change that with your work?


    Maybe here [in America], but in France we have a lot of power. So I don’t feel that specifically, but I realize there [are] very, very few female directors here. I don’t know why here. But in France I know if you have a good script, it’s not because you’re a female that you cannot make your movie.


    We have the same problem with salary, for sure. And sometimes I’m a little bit mad when I see female directors filming women in a very vulgar way, talking about bullshit, like problems we don’t have or something so unreal. Or the worse could be filming the women like they are men. I hate that. It’s so important. You have a mission here. You have a mission to do something different, take a step back from the cliche.


    As a female director I love women. I’m kind of obsessed with my actors, I love them so much. I’m just like, the more they’re beautiful, more they’re clever, more I want to feel them, more I want to respect them. It’s weird to be a female [who would want to] film women not in a beautiful way. I think it’s strange.


    This interview has been editing and condensed for clarity.


    "Breathe" is now playing.


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    It might be fall, but summer continues on the cover of Self magazine with Jessica Alba in a bikini. 


    Alba appears in the October 2015 issue of Self in a beach-themed photo shoot and discusses the journey to creating a billion-dollar company after years as an actress. 


    “I’ve always been business-minded,” the Honest Company co-founder said. “I approached Hollywood like a business … I’ve been building my own personal brand over time.”


    The journey was not always an easy one. “For a long time, I didn’t think I was smart," Alba explained. "I felt like an imposter. It’s not until you feel whole in yourself that you fit in anywhere. And it took me becoming a mom to actually feel that way.”






     


     


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    It's 2015, and we now have marriage equality across the land, from the biggest cities to the most remote rural areas. Every day homosexuality is made part of a public record, entered forever into an official government document as people celebrate that bond of same-sex matrimony.

    And yet, there's a bizarre disconnect. Many people still argue that being gay or bisexual is a "private" matter, one which should never be broached, even among privileged public figures whose lives are an open book in the media regarding just about every other subject -- including every aspect of heterosexuality. If they're straight, every actual, potential or former sex partner, boyfriend, girlfriend, husband or wife -- is speculated about and reported on. And certainly the individual in question is asked about it, and can choose to address it outright or be coy. But when it comes to homosexuality or bisexuality, the media, still queasy about sexual orientation (and I think still just plain confused), view even simply asking the question as invasive. And too many gay people give them license to do so.

    When my HuffPost colleague Noah Michelson wrote a blog post defending a journalist from a gay publication who asked actor Tom Hardy -- who plays a gay gangster in the new film "Legend" -- about his sexual orientation, Noah was savaged in the comments by people who ignored his basic point: There is nothing offensive about asking a public figure about his or her sexual orientation.

    Instead, the angry mob responded with emotion rather than reason, defending the "privacy" of Hardy, who called the reporter's question -- which initially was an open-ended question, simply asking if it was difficult for actors to discuss their sexuality -- "disrespectful." Many argued that everyone must come out on his or her own timetable. (For the record, Hardy, even after the ensuing uproar, still hasn't addressed his sexual orientation, saying only that "there's nothing ambiguous about my sexuality... I know who I am." But he has in the past discussed having experimented with same-sex experiences "as a boy.")

    But the truth is, Hardy and every other public figure forfeited much of their privacy when they pursued public lives and became public figures -- and certainly forfeited "timetables" about any heterosexual affairs they may have, as well as many other aspects of their lives. They could have chosen to stay as private citizens, and they'd retain privacy in all aspects of their lives, from their tax returns to their romances. Instead, they decided to seek lives in the spotlight. And ever since the landmark 1964 Supreme Court ruling in New York Times V. Sullivan, whatever is true about public figures is legally reportable and not considered private. More than that, in recent years state courts, including New York's highest court, have ruled that it's not wrong, or "defamatory," to even falsely say someone is gay, largely because the culture has changed and become more accepting. How can any of us argue that it's bad or harmful to even ask the question of a public figure when courts have ruled that it's not slanderous or harmful to even inaccurately call someone gay, based on the progress we've made?

    We claim we want to be treated equally as gay people, but then, in 2015, with much more acceptance in the culture, we still ask for special treatment of gay and bisexual public figures while every aspect of the sex and romantic lives of heterosexual public figures is dissected every day. We can't have it both ways any longer.

    Of course it's true that, unlike heterosexuals, LGBT people experience a great deal of discrimination in the majority of states, where there are no protections in housing, employment and public accommodations. And there is no federal law protecting LGBT Americans. Bullying and suicides occur at alarming rates and LGBT teens are ejected from their homes in terrible numbers, with 40 percent of all homeless youth being LGBT. As I've written quite a bit -- including in an entire book -- our work is certainly not over, not by a long shot.

    But ironically, when we refuse to broach the subject of gayness among public figures -- and we are only discussing public figures here, not private individuals -- we're covering for people who mostly live in liberal bastions of the coasts who have full protections, who use the media to publicize their work and who know that doing so comes with a great deal of scrutiny. More than that, as prominent celebrities, media figures and politicians, they are privileged individuals who enjoy the great accomplishments of the LGBT movement while those kids are being thrown onto the streets.

    And it's not going to change for those kids -- and all kids -- until they and everyone else see that homosexuality isn't treated as an unmentionable subject among the most privileged and powerful people in society. Asking the question is not "outing" -- a term I can't stand, and, if you read my pieces here on Gay Voices, you know why -- and a public figure can answer in any way that he or she chooses, from dodging the question (as Hardy did) to obscuring or outright lying about it. But I believe in 2015 a great many will simply choose to be honest when the question is asked, particularly if it's asked again and again, and if the culture just stops coddling them.

    It's not the media's job to cover up for public figures. And it's certainly not the media's job to send the mixed message to young people that, though they can now get married in any state if they're gay, heterosexuality is glamorous and exciting -- and reportable -- but homosexuality is a dirty secret that should never be raised.

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    Dylan Barnes has danced his way right into the heart of Taylor Swift.


    The 7-year-old, who appeared on "Ellen" last week after a video of him busting a move to TSwift's "Shake It Off" made its way around the Internet, finally got his chance to dance with the pop star herself.


    Thanks to Ellen DeGeneres, the young dancer got a pair of tickets and backstage access to the singer's Kansas City show, where he got to meet her. Swift, 25, shared an adorable video of herself and Barnes, aka Big Red, moving, grooving and shaking to her hit song on Instagram. Barnes nails it, obviously. 



    Finally got to meet Dylan, the 7-year-old who passionately danced to Shake It Off on Ellen--- and this happened.

    A video posted by Taylor Swift (@taylorswift) on



    Looks like Swift may have just found a new backup dancer. 


    Barnes' mom went on Twitter following the meet-and-greet-and-dance session to thank Swift. 


    "Thank you for making dreams come true! You are a class act! ," she wrote. 


     


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    Carrie Underwood turned up the heat on Monday as she performed at the Roundhouse in northwest London for the Apple Music Festival. 


    The superstar country singer sizzled as she sang, looking like a total knockout in a black sleeveless shirt and tiny black lace shorts. 



    Earlier this month, the former "American Idol" winner spoke to Taste of Country about the festival, calling it a "such a thrill" to play in the U.K. 


    "I’m really looking forward to heading back and being a part of such an amazing lineup at this year’s Apple Music Festival," the 32-year-old told the website. "What a unique concert experience, not only for the fans at the Roundhouse, but also for fans across the globe who can stream it live!”



    It's been a busy year for Underwood, who became a first-time mom in February and has since released her first music video since giving birth. The singer looked like a total smoke show in the video for "Smoke Break," which is off of her upcoming album "Storyteller."




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