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Celebrity news and blog articles from The Huffington Post

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    BY NICO LANG

    If you're going to pay tribute to a Meryl Streep movie, Out of Africa is an undoubtedly odd choice. Very loosely based on Isak Dinesen's autobiographical novel about a woman in a "marriage of convenience" who begins an affair with a local hunter (Robert Redford), OOA had its Crash moment in 1986, winning seven Academy Awards, including Best Picture. The problem is that it's not very good -- in fact, it's widely remembered as one of the worst movies to take home top honors at the ceremony. If you're going to get your Streep on, why not Silkwood or The Devil Wears Prada? The French Lieutenant's Woman? Even a Mamma Mia tribute would make for a good drinking game.

    MORE FROM THE DAILY DOT





    An homage to a love triangle about white colonialists is going to present some, uh, challenges to an artist who just wants to make a three-minute music video to put on her VEVO page -- and Taylor Swift found that out the hard way. The singer debuted her vid for "Wildest Dreams" at the VMAs Sunday night, and even the most casual observer would have noticed that -- for a clip that's set in Africa -- it's about as white as a Sunday morning farmer's market. Featuring Scott Eastwood (son to Clint), the video wants to have its old-school Hollywood romance but ends up eating some old-school Hollywood racism, too. And it's sadly indicative of its star's own shoddy racial politics.

    In a recent essay for Refinery29, Lauren Le Vine referred to Taylor Swift's music videos as "timeless fantasies," and there's apparently nothing more timeless than white colonialism. From Swift's dark, Streep-esque black hair to its Fitzgerald-goes-on-safari costuming and Instagram-ready savannah backdrop, the video is both stunning and stunningly tone-deaf. As the Huffington Post's Lauren Duca writes, "instead of the cultural appropriation that has become almost status quo in today's pop music, Swift has opted for the bolder option of actually just embodying the political exploitation of a region and its people." Duca really hits the nail on the head here: Just because you represent the past or pay respect to it doesn't mean you need to recreate its worst aspects.

    However, this isn't the first time Swift has been accused of "accidental racism" in her work. After her video for "Shake It Off" debuted last August, rapper Earl Sweatshirt accused the singer of "perpetuating black stereotypes," especially in a segment where Swift dressed up in gold chains and hoop earrings while sliding underneath the legs of a twerking black woman.



    The Pitchfork Review's senior editor Jessica Hopper argued it was even worse than a similar moment in Miley Cyrus' "We Can't Stop." "Miley used women of color as props, but her appropriation was participatory," Hopper wrote. "In a strange way, her dancing with them is maybe a modicum 'better' than Taylor tunneling out from underneath these legs and looking up with this smirk, like 'Isn't this wacky? I don't even understand?'"

    As Chris Osterndorf pointed out last year in an op-ed for the Daily Dot, this is a music problem as much as it is a Taylor Swift problem, as musicians -- especially female pop stars -- often struggle to appreciate other cultures without stepping over the line. From Selena Gomez' bindi and Pharrell's Native American headdress to whatever was going on in Avril Lavigne's "Hello Kitty" video, being a humble, respectful guest in someone else's culture is difficult, and many continue to get it wrong. To an extent, appropriation is also the history of rock music itself, which borrowed elements of blues from black musicians for the profit of white artists.

    But it's this erasure that's becoming a problem in Taylor Swift's music -- and her budding politics. Two years after publicly disavowing the label, Swift officially came out as a feminist in 2014, and in her VMAs speech last night, accepting Video of the Year for "Bad Blood," she injected some girl power. Swift said, "There's been a lot of discussion about this video and what it means, but I'm just happy that in 2015, we live in a world where boys can play princesses and girls can play soldiers."

    It was a nice moment from a star whose worldview is evolving, but her recent Twitter spat with Nicki Minaj pointed out its limits: Swift infamously erased the hip-hop star's critique about racism, choosing instead to tone-police her and preach female solidarity instead. The Huffington Post's Zena Blay referred to it as "peak white feminism," an unfortunate phenomenon of using issues of gender to erase systemic racial discrimination.

    After the VMA nominations were announced in July, Minaj took to the social media platform to complain about her snub for "Anaconda" - -which was left out of the "Video of the Year" race, despite becoming an inescapable cultural force -- pointing out, "If your video celebrates women with very slim bodies, you will be nominated for vid of the year." Swift responded on Twitter, "I've done nothing but love & support you. It's unlike you to pit women against each other."



    They publicly made up and Swift even came out to join Nicki Minaj last night during the show's opener, a performance of Minaj's "The Night Is Still Young." The two embraced on stage, and while it seemed to bury the hatchet, it was pulled out of the ground later in the evening. During her aforementioned VMAs speech, the "Bad Blood" squad joined her on stage -- including Hailee Steinfeld, Cara Delevingne, and Mariska Hargitay -- but one person was conspicuously missing: Nicki Minaj. During their Twitter exchange, Swift promised Minaj: "If I win, please come up with me!! You're invited to any stage I'm ever on." She also failed to get a mention in Swift's speech.




    The difference here is crucial: Swift instead got an invite to Nicki Minaj's stage. Thus, it seems that Taylor Swift is still having trouble making room for people of color on her own platform -- whether her overwhelmingly white friend group, that's in her music videos, or her version of solidarity. Swift has recently made her name on empowering young women, but she needs to rethink her definition of what empowerment means -- and who it leaves out.


    MORE FROM THE DAILY DOT





    As punk singer Kathleen Hanna of Bikini Kill recently pointed out, her continued engagement matters to her millions of fans that follow her every move. "When somebody that's a huge megastar that has so many young fans, like Taylor Swift or Miley Cyrus or Beyoncé, comes out and says, 'I'm a feminist,' I mean, that's the sound of hundreds of thousands of girls typing the word into the Internet," Hanna said. That's incredible cultural influence, and it's important for her feminism to continue to evolve -- by making mistakes, learning from them, and striving to show that she's doing the work of inclusivity.

    While it's admirable and awesome that Swift has showed up to the party, it would be nice if everyone else at Swift's party didn't look exactly like her. Just because Taylor Swift's videos are out of Africa doesn't mean her politics have to be, too.

    This story originally published on the Daily Dot.


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    You know why E.T. tells Elliott, "I'll be right here"? It's so Steven Spielberg can always be around to reach out and rip our hearts out. 


    The legendary director recently explained to The Associated Press that everyone's fascination with superhero movies won't last forever. Hold me.



    We were around when the Western died, and there will be a time when the superhero movie goes the way of the Western.



    Unless going "the way of the Western" means Iron Man and Captain America are going to start wearing cowboy boots, this is a little disconcerting. But, hey, what does Spielberg know, right? Sure, his recent project, "Jurassic World," went on to become one of the highest-grossing films of all time, but who keeps track of that stuff anyway? ... Right?


    Despite the director's ominous prediction, fans shouldn't get too concerned just yet. Remember, these are superheroes we're talking about, and they never stay dead for long. Spielberg added that there could always be another time when the superhero movie returns. And with "Captain America: Civil War," "Deadpool" and "Batman v Superman" all scheduled to come out next year, it doesn't look like they're going to die too soon. 


    In the meantime, don't fall for that alien's tricks, Elliott, no matter how cool its light-up finger is.




    H/T Vulture

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    Like a middle schooler with a Sharpie, Donald Trump responded to Kareem Abdul-Jabbar's criticism with little to no tact. 


    On Wednesday, Abdul-Jabbar published an op-ed for the Washington Post about the differences between Trump's and Bernie Sanders' "grace under pressure." While Sanders has displayed just that, Abdul-Jabbar wrote that Trump has lashed out at journalists and their First Amendment rights. 


    "Attempting to bully the press to silence criticism of him is anti-American," he wrote. "He followed up this salvo on the First Amendment with a strike at the 14th Amendment, asserting that he’d like to deny those born in the country their citizenship. The biggest enemy to the principles of the Constitution right now is Trump."


    The GOP presidential nominee hopeful responded hours later with a handwritten message, telling the retired NBA star, cultural ambassador and bestselling author that he doesn't have a clue.  





    Now I know why the press always treated you so badly -- they couldn’t stand you. The fact is that you don’t have a clue about life and what has to be done to make America great again!


    Best wishes, Donald Trump



    Abdul-Jabbar shared the note in another Washington Post piece, writing: "Trump’s response to my piece is the best, though inelegant, support for my claims. Here again, he attacks a journalist who disagrees with him, not by disputing the points made but by hurling schoolyard insults such as 'nobody likes you.'"


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    Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson may seem like a tough guy on the outside, but deep down he's just a big, animal-loving softy. 


    The wrestler-turned-actor shared an adorable #throwbackthursday photo on Instagram this week showing him with a huge smile on his face while petting a dog. And can we just take a moment to look at how much that dog is loving it? Priceless. 


    Johnson captioned the sweet pic, "My animal magnetism. Or he just smells the bomb tacos I just ate. #tbt." 



    A photo posted by therock (@therock) on



    Cute! But nothing will ever beat The Rock's high school throwback: 


     



    A photo posted by therock (@therock) on



    You're welcome.  


     


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    This is going to make for one badass #TBT some day. 


    On Tuesday, former Miss USA Shanna Moakler went to Instagram to share a photo of her two ridiculously stylish children, Alabama, 9, and Landon, 11. With their vibrantly colored hair and their extremely on-point sneaker game, the brother-sister duo obviously got some of their fashion sense from their drummer dad, Travis Barker. Ugh, why couldn't our parents have dressed us like this?! 



    First day of school for these two little monsters! First day of middle school for @landon.barker @alabamaluellabarker

    A photo posted by Shanna Moakler (@shannamoakler) on



    Barker also recently shared a picture with his kids on a back-to-school shopping spree. Here's all three of them, looking effortlessly cooler than we've ever looked in our entire adult lives.



    Sigh. Now excuse us while we attempt to calculate how much lunch money we would still have if we wore this instead of a pair of overalls on the first day of middle school. 


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    Wes Bentley, best known for his role as Ricky Fitts in 1999's "American Beauty," opened up about his history of drug use and his close bond to Heath Ledger during a recent interview with Larry King.


    Drugs became a problem for the Arkansas native in 2006. 


    "The drugs got harder and I got deeper in it, and I started considering considering things like selling [drugs] and DJing for a living instead of acting," the actor, who currently appears in the EDM-centric "We Are Your Friends," said. 


    "Some people have one bottom, I had 10 or 12 bottoms: a friend who passed away; I had no money; I lost contact with my family," he continued. "I finally met somebody who I loved and that kind of turned around. And then I met somebody who was sober and I wanted what he had. And then I worked really hard. I still work really hard."


    The conversation turned to Ledger, who died in 2008 of a combined drug intoxication. Bentley and Ledger became close on the set of 2002's "The Four Feathers." 


    "He was like a brother to me," he said. "We were close friends. We worked on 'Four Feathers' together in 2000 and since then we had become very, very close. We had good times and bad times ... [his death is] the biggest loss of my life. Yeah." 


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    No one tires of hearing someone rip a guitar to pieces. Hell, no one tires of doing it. But sitting on a balcony overlooking lower Manhattan on a humid August day, bluesy rock-'n'-roller and soon-to-be-legend Gary Clark Jr. explains that he wants his newest album, "The Story Of Sonny Boy Slim," (out Sept. 11), to be more than just a guitar-shredding feast. He wants you to know he’s also a “singer-songwriter soul funk dude.”


    Clark’s always had pipes, he told The Huffington Post while donning his signature hat, Ray-Ban sunglasses and all-black ensemble. Though his skills pack the power to leave listeners drooling, Clark felt it was time to change things up. Time to “turn the guitar up and make some noise” -- vocally, that is.


    “I was just kind of waiting for the time to bust that out,” Clark said. “And I really wanted this album to be, like, more musical, more expressive -- not just wait for the guitar solo, you know?"



    "The Story of Sonny Boy Slim," a title made up of an amalgamation of nicknames Clark’s accrued over the years, is different than what we've heard from him. His 2012 first studio album, "Blak and Blu," woke us up to his bluesy rock-'n'-roll frisk. His 2014 album "Gary Clark Jr. Live" is one for the books. 


    But he had a lot of reflecting to do prior to his latest release after an “all of a sudden” switch from a down home Austin, Texas life to a “bigger” existence as a van-riding, trailer-pulling musician. He needed to take a step back. Reflect. Get things off his chest. An album was born, with him as a producer, songwriter and performer. He felt a “weight lifted off my shoulders,” when he finished it.


    “I became very aware of how important music was in my life," he said. "And if I didn’t have that outlet, I don’t know what kind of trouble I’d be in."



    This guy … long time ago, he told me I was musically schizophrenic."



    Thirty-one-year-old Slim -- a nickname Clark got in his early “blues scene circle” days -- starts the album off with “The Healing,” which hearkens a gospel-music-as-salvation tempo that sets an appropriate stage for the rest of the album. Nearly 45 minutes and 12 songs later, Clark bequeaths to us the Motown feel-good we crave in the track “Our Love.” He graces us with country bliss with the song “Church” and straight-up groove in the tracks “Can’t Sleep” and "Shake." 


    For Clark fans who wait for him to destroy the instrument he knows most, there are times when the album seems restrained. But he’s already turned the guitar right-side up in performances of his newest songs. He reminds us of his uncanny ability to seamlessly weave together sounds and genres with little hesitation. It’s not something he consciously does, he said. He’s just making “soul music." 


    “This guy … long time ago, he told me I was musically schizophrenic. And that was the first time that I kind of thought about it being strange, ‘cause I don’t really think about putting genres together," Clark said. "I just kind of do it. My whole songwriting process isn’t really a process. I just kind of noodle around and a melody will come to me and I’ll just express it.”




    In what was becoming an increasingly hotter early afternoon, the two of us pondered how he grasped such skill. Clark reckons it was probably growing up in the Austin music scene, where he’d see the cross-pollination of performers in a rockabilly show dash over to perform in a blues gig. Clark was picking up on the “weird” “melting pot” of Austin.


    “I mean, Sixth Street, if you walk up and down the street on a weekend, or any night of the week, it’s a lot of information, you know, musically,” he said. “I like to be able to pop in and hear some blues and then go get a slice of pizza across the street and there’s a country band playing."



    To be even in the conversation with [Hendrix], whether it’s positive or negative, I mean, I think I’m doing something right."



    Clark was young, maybe five or six years old, when he and his sisters first started singing hits from Stevie Wonder, Marvin Gaye, Al Green, Prince and Michael Jackson -- the latter of whom can be thanked for paving Clark’s musical brick road. He was just five years old when he saw Jackson perform on his “Bad” tour -- Clark's first ever concert.


    “It was like one of my first real memories of this major energy, excitement. The lights, loud music. So I mean, if that didn’t stick, I don’t know what would at five years old,” Clark explained. His shyness during the interview continued to dissipate as he described putting flashlights in his socks as a kid and dancing around with the lights off -- a “ridiculous” endeavor, he concluded. 


    Since his Jackson-impersonating days, Clark's built a Grammy-winning career acclaimed by music legends. Buddy Guy called Clark "as good as it gets.” Eric Clapton once wrote him a letter saying, “Thank you -- you made me want to play again.” 


    There's something notable about Clark's respect for the musicians who’ve paved the way to make his career possible. With reverence, he described the “emotional” and “thought-provoking” experience of playing alongside artists including B.B. King, Mick Jagger, Buddy Guy, Booker T. Jones and Jeff Beck at the White House in 2012. Clark paid special attention to King and Guy that day.




    "To look at B.B. King up there and know that he played segregated venues and he put in work, and grew up in a small place in Mississippi. Just his struggle and for him to be at the White House … [with] the Obamas, just that whole thing,” Clark remembered. “It was like, I wouldn’t be here if they hadn’t paved that path, so for me it was really a humbling moment. And to see them up there proud and I could see how Buddy was like, he had this thing like, ‘Man, we’re here. All this work.’”


    It's this demeanor that's made Clark want to push aside any Hendrix comparisons he's received. It’s not that he doesn’t appreciate them -- it’s out of respect for the late Jimi. 


    “It used to bug me. It really used to bother me because Hendrix is great, like once again, paved the way. I wouldn’t be here if it weren’t for that guy,” Clark said. “You know, people will say, ‘Oh, you’re nothing like Hendrix.’ Blah blah blah. Like, I know that. I don’t ever wake up and go, ‘I’m coming for you, Jimi!’ It doesn’t happen. I know my place and I know my influences and to be even in the conversation with him, whether it’s positive or negative, I mean, I think I’m doing something right.” 



    As Clark joins the ranks of his guitar-legend lodestars, he's paying it forward to younger talent, including to a fledgling guitarist named Brandon "Taz" Niederauer. During Clark's show at Central Park's Rumsey Playfield last year, Clark unexpectedly asked Niederauer, whom he'd previously met, to join him onstage for an encore performance of "Bright Lights." The babe-in-the-woods 11-year-old said absolutely. 


    “His eyes get really big, he’s like, ‘Yeah man,’" Clark remembered upon asking Niederauer to join him onstage. "So I’m like, ‘Alright well, you can take this part here ... I was like, ‘Are you cool with that?’ He’s like ‘I got it, don’t worry about it.’ I’m like, 'Who the hell are you, man?'” 



    The now 12-year-old Niederauer, a longtime fan of Clark's, told HuffPost it was "the most amazing show," -- like "fire on stage," he said -- especially to play alongside someone who's "basically starting his own genre." 


    "I really want to be like him because he’s so successful at what he does. He’s so good at what he does," Niederauer said. "And he doesn’t do it like everybody else does." After the show, Clark realized he had to "step it up 'cause these kids are not playing around," he said laughing. 


    Perhaps it is rising musicians like Niederauer who pushed Clark to give "120 percent" on "The Story Of Sonny Boy Slim." Or perhaps he's just taking on new sounds and roles as his career ascends. Regardless, this upcoming year is going to be a big one. In addition to his worldwide tour for his new release, he’s opening for the Foo Fighters in the band’s upcoming September and October shows.


    Clark's also got a new "little man" to show around: his son, Zion Rain, with partner Nicole Trunfio. Prior to his latest release, Clark did a lot of reflecting into his uncharted world of fatherhood.   



    "Hopefully he’ll understand what I’m out here trying to do," the new father said. "But it’s amazing. It’s so beautiful." 


    And while Clark has no plans for his new babe musically -- because, who knows, "he might do something completely different, be interested in other things" --  he hopes "he’ll understand where my music comes from and know that a lot of this last record was really inspired by him."


    “Nicole was pregnant when I was recording and so I'd walk to the studio, come back home," Clark said. "And, you know, I was just in this world of the unknown and being responsible for raising a little human being. So a lot of that was going on in my head when I was in the studio. So, I’m doing this for you, son.”


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    Blake Lively is basically a goddess who always looks amazing, but even she has to endure a little bit of butt kicking in the gym to stay fit. 


    The actress shared a post-gym photo on Instagram Wednesday featuring her and her trainer, Don Saladino, getting a little silly after a workout. Lively is seen sticking her finger up Saladino's nose (as you do), while he smiles with his eyes closed.


    She even added a punny caption to the pic, while at the same time telling her followers that, contrary to popular belief, she has cellulite.


    "This fit dude, @donsaladino NOSE how to kick my butt (see what I did there )#WhyIsCelluliteIsSoMuchCuterOnBabies You'll die over his training on Broadway. Officially a maniac. Which is of course why we get along. ," she wrote. 



    A photo posted by Blake Lively (@blakelively) on



    The "Age of Adaline" star has been quite open about her fitness routine, especially since the birth of her daughter James last December.


    In April of this year, Lively spoke to You magazine about how she's been staying fit since her pregnancy, saying (per the Daily Mail), "Your body goes through a lot after pregnancy and birth, so small, gentle workouts feel better. I hate the gym. Who doesn’t? When I’m in the gym I feel like I am missing out. [So] I would rather rent a bike or go for a hike."


    Whatever she's doing, it's working. Lively looks great, as always. 


     


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    Wim Wenders is a name that signals an immediate flow of love and admiration from cinephiles and road movie fans. From the road films that defined much of his career, including 1975's "Alice in the Cities" and Palme d'Or winner "Paris, Texas," to his most revered masterpiece, 1984's "Wings of Desire," to documentaries "Buena Vista Social Club" and 2011's "Pina," one of the first 3D arthouse films, the filmmaker has made sure to continually reinvent himself throughout his 40-plus years in the business. Whether it was embracing the spontaneity of filming on the road, adopting HD video or implementing 3D into his work in unconventional ways, Wenders' creative appetite has always been satiated by the unexplored.


    His upcoming drama,"Every Thing Will Be Fine," starring James Franco and Rachel McAdams, is attempting to change the conversation and reception of 3D filmmaking, something Wenders is a strong advocate of. "I have to talk so much about convincing people it will be worth it because it’s in their mind that 3D is not for them, especially in the art house," Wenders told The Huffington Post.


    The filmmaker sat down with HuffPost to discuss his hopes for the medium while reflecting on his career, which is currently being celebrated at IFC Center's monthlong touring retrospective. "Wim Wenders: Portraits Along the Road" will screen 12 films, including 11 restorations of his classics and rarities, in New York before traveling across 15 states. Here's our full conversation with Wenders:




    This retrospective is so exciting, since it’s touring across the country. Traveling through America has been a major theme in your work.


    True. It reminds me, the first time I traveled with my films was in 1978. We went through the entire Midwest at a dozen universities. That was the first time I toured with any of my films in America. We actually had the prints in our truck. Lots of Q&As. Stayed in lots of fancy, or not-at-all fancy little hotels, because you didn’t have all that much money at the time. At the time, we traveled with a three-pack of “The American Friend," "Kings of the Road” and “Wrong Move.”




    So much of your filmography focuses on the wanderer searching for themselves throughout their travels. What first drew you to the the misfit traveler and how do you think it’s evolved over the course of your career?


    I didn’t start out like that. I was a little unhappy because I felt I was, strangely, imitating other movies. My very first film, “Summer in the City,” looked like a Cassavetes movie. “The Goalie’s Anxiety at the Penalty Kick” looked like a Hitchcock film. And the next one, “Scarlet Letter,” looked like a historic epic. Then I said, “Wait a minute. If this is what it’s all about, filmmaking to imitate other movies, that’s not for me, then.” I really wanted to find out what I could do on my own without any model. That’s when I shot -- I said, “If this movie’s going to be one that nobody else could have made except me, then I’d continue filmmaking.” That became “Alice in the Cities” and that was my first road movie. And I really discovered it innocently on my own. I think I didn’t know you could make a film on the road, traveling and changing as it went along. That was a big discovery. I kept shooting like this for almost a decade on the road. That became, in a way, my trademark. At least for a while.


    Were you conscious of it becoming your trademark at the time?


    No. I felt like a fish in the water because I finally knew something that really corresponded to me and that I felt I didn’t owe to anybody else. And you know, road movies are really a modernized version of Westerns. I’d grown up with Western movies, I loved them. But of course I wouldn’t want to shoot any because today a Western would be a historic film. And I’m not so much friends with horses. I like cows and I like rock ‘n’ roll. Road movies, they just combined everything I liked: driving, traveling, listening to music and sort of going into the unknown. I didn’t know it was going to be a trademark. Then I think it was critics and the audience who sort of classified it.   



    How do you feel about that? Would you prefer your work to not have labels?


    As soon as you realize you’ve been classified, you want to get out of that. So I did get out of that, but I still made another road movie. I think I made the ultimate road movie in 1991 with “Until the End of the World” where we traveled once around the globe in many, many different cars and ships and trains and planes. Then I realized there were other kinds of movies to make.


    What you said about going into the unknown in your films, did that at all reflect your approach to making them?


    I like the kind of filmmaking where you as a filmmaker and your team would sort of make an experience and go on an adventure, and not just pretend to have an adventure. I think the audience knows if the filmmakers really are on an adventure or produced an adventure. I was much more in favor of going for the adventure with my team and actors, and being involved in it. I always felt this was more intoxicating than pretending. That’s why I’ve been doing a lot more documentaries lately over the past 20 years, because it seemed in the documentary field it was easier to uphold that maxim to have an adventure.


    You’re also an avid photographer. That medium has changed so much as digital photography has become ubiquitous and entire films are being shot on iPhones. What do you think of those changes in relation to filmmaking?


    It would’ve been unimaginable 20, 30, 50 years ago that you would say people walked around with phones that had cameras in them and give them access to any encyclopedia and movies and music. I mean, it was science fiction. I actually showed that phenomenon in my only science-fiction film in “Until the End of the World.” People were running around with these mobile phones that had screens on them and they actually saw their own dreams on them -- we’re not quite there yet. Today, it’s amazing: every person is tied to their machine. It’s scary. So making movies on these machines now is natural. I’m also teaching films and my students and I make lots of movies on iPhones. I’m aware of the medium, and at the same time it’s still a little painful for me when I see people using it to actually watch movies that were made with an intention to show images that were supposed to be seen on the screen. But then again, [points to his Apple Watch] I can go tinier. 



    Would you watch a movie on there?


    I wouldn’t for the hell watch anything else, but sometimes news. It’s scary that it gets even smaller.


    But you have embraced some new technology, such as 3D.


    I always loved technology. I was always a geek. I was the very first filmmaker who adopted high-definition video. “Until the End of the World” was the very first film that used digital cinematography, period. And “Buena Vista Social Club” was the first all-digital documentary out in theaters. And “Pina” was the first 3D film. So I always loved technology when I had the impression it allowed us to do things we weren’t able to do before. Sometimes that’s true, sometimes that’s not. 


    Looking back on your career, what would you had done differently if you had access to advanced technology at the time?


    I don’t know. I’ve always tried to work on the cutting edge of what was possible. Sometimes the cutting edge was also a strange link to the past. Like “Wings of Desire” was shot in black and white. The director of photography [Henri Alekan] was 80 years old and had started his career in the silent movies. But on the other hand, it was cutting edge in terms of how you can move cameras. We invented cranes that didn’t exist yet and Steadicam didn’t exist yet. We moved the camera in ways that nobody had seen before. But at the same time, it was very old-fashioned aesthetics. So sometimes it’s a mixture of what’s possible and what one would like to conserve of the past.


    How else do you want to innovate moving forward?


    I’m a big defender of 3D cinema and I’m shocked and sad about what is actually being done with this fantastic medium, and how much is going to the dogs because there’s not enough good stuff produced with it. A lot of people are now turned off and think a 3D movie by definition must be garbage. I just shot the first intimate drama in 3D in “Everything Will Be Fine.” [...] There’s this huge prejudice against one of the greatest inventions in the history of cinema. Now the industry is either ruining it or not accepting it as language. They just use it as effect and that drives me crazy. I really, really hope it still has a chance to catch on and be used by documentary filmmakers, authors and independent filmmakers. I don’t know why everybody is shying away from it. Everybody thinks it can only be used for effect.



    Is that why you chose to use it in a drama?


    Yeah, because I was convinced it is a medium that gets you much closer to people. It’s a medium that you can use for very intimate purposes. Acting in front of a 3D camera is a whole new territory. In most 3D films you see, almost all of them, there is no real serious acting happening. Most actors in 3D movies are caricatures. Even somebody as great as Johnny Depp as a pirate is just caricature. But 3D acting is really unbelievable because they see so much more and see so precisely. They see every tiny moment of over-acting, they see every mistake. They’re almost like x-rays, you see through to people’s souls. That is a propensity that is not really being discovered in cinema. 


    Will you use it again in your next film, “The Beautiful Days of Aranjuez”?


    As long as it’s still possible. I’ve now shot five films already in 3D. Well, two features and three short films. “The Beautiful Days of Aranjuez,” that’s the third feature now in 3D but I didn’t count it in because I’m still editing it. It’s a drama. Only two people. It’s the last dialogue of a man and a woman before the end of the world. 


    Jean-Luc Godard is one of the only other art house filmmakers to use 3D besides you.


    Yes. And he used it in his very own way. You can always count on him to be quite … destructive at the same time, on the medium.


    You wouldn’t employ 3D in the ways he did in “Goodbye to Language”?


    I think it’s a great medium for narrative film, and his film is more like an essay film. And “Pina” was really a documentary. I think really as a narrative medium, it still needs to be discovered.


     This interview has been edited and condensed.


    "Wim Wenders: Portraits Along the Road" is now playing at IFC Center in New York. Head to their website for the full schedule.


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    It's not every day that we meet a 3-year-old who is a dead wringer for Harry Styles. So when we do, we feel the need to tell the world. 


    So meet Michael, a Russia-based toddler who has an Instagram account that shows off his incredible style and his uncanny resemblance to a certain British pop star. The feed, run by his mother, features the tot in skinny jeans, wide-brimmed hats and even man buns. Man buns!!! 


    We have a feeling that in a few years, this kid is going to be a serious heartbreaker. But until then, enjoy a few of our favorite snaps of the tyke below. 








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    This week, two celebrities were on fire in the style department: Elle Fanning and Diane Kruger. 


    These ladies are quite possibly the most fashionable women in Hollywood, so it comes as no surprise that they hit it out of the park with their outfits. 


    Fanning teaches us how to wear flared denim and roomy black jumpsuits, while Kruger proves that all heroes do in fact wear capes. 


    Check out the best-dressed stars from the past couple of days and let us know which look is your favorite. 



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    Joan Rivers left this world one year ago today, but it still feels like we'll see her next resurgence any day now. Surely she's about to make another return to "The Tonight Show," where she'll unleash barbs about Donald Trump's campaign and North West's soon-to-be baby brother. Obviously Stephen Colbert will invite her onto "The Late Show" in lieu of her frequent quips with David Letterman. It's about time for new episodes of "In Bed with Joan" and another tour, right? And, of course, any day now I'll glimpse her fur coat prancing through the halls of HuffPost Live, where she was a regular guest.  


    For anyone else who pretended Rivers would spring back to life after last August's botched throat surgery, her absence is just now setting in. As much as I'd like to think she's on an extended vacation, anyone familiar with Rivers' career knows that she takes no breaks. (After all, she was still winning Grammys after her death.) But things are happening in the world that demand commentary from the first female comic to headline Carnegie Hall. This is the first presidential election she won't commentate in who knows how long. Instead of lambasting the Emmy red carpet's fashion choices in a few weeks, she'll presumably be part of the show's In Memoriam segment. And who will tell us what to think when Oscar season boots up and there are umpteen award-show faux pas to parse through? 




    When beloved actors or musicians die unexpectedly, we find a shred of consolation in whatever fresh material will be released posthumously. Many argued that Paul Walker's death, for example, is part of what made "Furious 7" the most lucrative installment in that behemoth franchise. Twenty-one years after Kurt Cobain's suicide, fans still eat up any of his lost music that surfaces. But the ever-transparent Rivers, whose insightful 2010 documentary showcases the elaborate filing system she used to catalog every joke she wrote, isn't someone who'd keep a secret comedy album buried within her Marie Antoinette-inspired Manhattan penthouse. There is nothing to keep Rivers alive but the remains of her cultural impact. That leaves the rest of us to endure 17 Republican nominees sparring about anchor babies without the respite of Rivers' quick-witted scorn. 


    What's suffered the most without Rivers is undoubtably "Fashion Police," the E! snark-fest that Rivers was the face of since its launch in 2010. The show underwent a brief hiatus until Kathy Griffin -- long considered Rivers' comedic heir thanks to her likeminded infatuation with celebrity culture -- took over hosting duties. The show saw one implosion after the next: Griffin, who reportedly angled for the job while Rivers was on her death bed, lasted a mere seven episodes before calling it quits. Kelly Osbourne, one of the program's original moderators, dropped out shortly thereafter. Rumors of feuds swirled. "This never would have happened if my mother was alive," Melissa Rivers, the show's executive producer and new co-host, said in June.



    This is all a distended way of saying that life is no fun without Joan Rivers' biting, business-savvy persona around to hand us things to argue about. For better or worse, I wonder whether she'd land in hot water over Caitlyn Jenner zingers, having called Michelle Obama a "tranny" last year. Would she ease up on her pal Trump, having won "The Celebrity Apprentice" in 2009, or would she go all in on, say, his recent interview with Sarah Palin, whom she called "stupid" in 2011? And oh, the things she could have said about Miley Cyrus' wardrobe at Sunday's MTV Video Music Awards. ("Every time this girl twerks in public, an angel gets knocked up," Rivers scoffed after the singer's VMA performance with Robin Thicke.)


    I read a great deal about Rivers in the wake of her death, but one sentence that Phillip Maciak wrote for Slate struck me in particular: "The central irony of Rivers’ face, as it’s evolved over the years, is that the more artificial and mask-like her appearance became, the fewer and fewer shits she seemed to give about what anybody thought of her." She lived to the ripe age of 81, but she deserved another decade to bathe in the heyday she hadn't experienced since before Johnny Carson blacklisted her in 1986. She deserved to let her already sparse boundaries lend her even more brashness and more relevance. In a way, Amy Schumer is carrying some of Rivers' torch. Either way, it won't burn out. She is our dearly departed guardian angel of truth.


    "That's what's so wonderful about life -- you must always have something else you want to do," Rivers said on HuffPost Live in 2013. Her list included a return to Broadway, her own late-night show (again) and getting laid. Whether those things were feasible doesn't matter. Rivers was always one of our most aspirational celebrities, constantly seeking a new trail to blaze. If only we could see what the next one had looked like. 


     


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    In August, The New York Times published a piece called "Beyoncé Is Seen But Not Heard." The singer had raised eyebrows with her September Vogue cover -- for the first time in at least the past five years, a Vogue cover girl had not submitted to an interview along with her photo shoot. The cover story, then, contained no fresh or revelatory details about its subject's life or career. It was simply an eloquent think piece by Pulitzer Prize winner Margo Jefferson.


    "At some imperceptible point around 2013 to 2014," the Times' Matthew Schneier complained, "she appears to have stopped giving face-to-face interviews." 



    A photo posted by Beyoncé (@beyonce) on



    But why should Beyoncé change? Her silence may frustrate journalists hungry for a juicy quote, sure. But at 34 -- after 18 years in the biz -- Beyonce has reached a level of pop stardom akin to Prince, one of her musical idols and another notorious interview-dodger. Yet it's hard to recall journalists accusing Prince (or many other male celebrities) of avoiding interviews for fear of appearing "daffy," as Schneier did Beyoncé.


    Beyoncé is well known for her obsessive control of her product, which is, of course, herself. A 2011 Dazed And Confused profile dubbed the singer "a self-confessed 'control freak.'" Her creative director told OUT magazine last year that Beyoncé is "completely relentless in her pursuit of perfectionism." 


    Perhaps the strangest outcome of her involvement in what's come to be known as Beyoncé, Inc. is what the singer calls her "crazy archive." Touring her Manhattan office for a 2013 GQ profile, Amy Wallace got a peek at a room that serves as "a temperature-controlled digital-storage facility that contains virtually every existing photograph of [Beyoncé], starting with the very first frames taken of Destiny’s Child, the ’90s girl group she once fronted; every interview she’s ever done; every video of every show she’s ever performed; every diary entry she’s ever recorded while looking into the unblinking eye of her laptop."


    Since 2005, Wallace wrote, the singer has also been recording her every (or nearly every) waking moment. (An earlier Vogue piece notes the camera propped in Beyoncé's dressing room after a rehearsal.) Those video files are also stored in the crazy archive.  


    "Anything that you see posted to the public has gone through her approval. Every single item," Beyoncé's digital strategist, Lauren Wirtzer-Seawood, told Musically. Beyoncé will let fans into her world -- but only through carefully edited writing or videos. (The Beyoncé documentary "Life Is But A Dream" was produced and directed by the singer, and her 2013 album's surprise release was hailed as a masterful feat of PR engineering.)



    A photo posted by Beyoncé (@beyonce) on



    Her team maintains a website, updated with tour dates, press coverage and the like, and a Facebook page updates similarly. She doesn't use Twitter -- the last of her eight tweets appeared on August 19, 2013. The closest she comes to being another one of her generation's prolific sharers -- a la Taylor Swift, Nicki Minaj or the Kardashians -- is a curated Instagram feed, highlighting snapshots of her glamorous life.





    All of that can and seemingly does irritate journalists.


    Jason Gay wrote in his 2013 profile of the singer that "an audience with Beyoncé can be as challenging to schedule as a tennis match with the pope." OUT only scored an email interview. Former Vogue U.K. features editor Jo Ellison told The Huffington Post in an email that she spent a year pursuing a Beyoncé cover shoot and profile. Another New York Times writer, Courtney Rubin, struggled to secure a comment from the singer for a piece on 22 Days Nutrition, the vegan food company she runs with husband Jay Z. Having been "promised for more than a month" a phone interview, Rubin was miffed when she had to settle for an email response. 


    But Beyoncé has little obligation to the media anymore; her self-image control has been well-earned. It's a mark of her power and the celebrity status she's achieved by being one of the hardest-working people in music. She enjoys photo shoots, so she agrees to photo shoots. She enjoys the freedom to edit her direct responses to questions, so she does that, too. 



    A photo posted by Beyoncé (@beyonce) on



    It's natural to want a peaceful, private life, even if you've chosen to live yours in a global spotlight. That's how people are. Why wouldn't Beyoncé want to buy her own semblance of privacy -- by controlling her voice, her photos, interviews and diary entries -- especially when that is increasingly valuable?


    And, as former tennis star Andy Roddick recently did for Serena Williams, we need to wonder whether we would treat Beyoncé differently if her name wasn't Beyoncé, but Prince. Or George Clooney. Or Jay Z. 


    Maybe it is difficult to imagine that famous people should be able to control their image, should they also be willing to put in the effort. In the end, no one can explain that better than Beyoncé.


    "I worked so hard during my childhood to meet this goal," she told Wallace. "By the time I was 30 years old, I could do what I want."


    Happy birthday, Bey.  


     


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    Fans got a glimpse of a scantily clad Selena Gomez on Thursday when the singer shared a black-and-white lingerie photo to promote an album release event later this month. 


    "You guys can still sign up for my little REVIVAL event in September because I wanna meet yall and share some stuff so.... Link in bio ❤️ #thealbumscomingggg #REVIVAL," she wrote beside the shot of her in a black bra and high-waisted briefs.



    A photo posted by Selena Gomez (@selenagomez) on



    "Revival" is due out Oct. 9 and is a personal one for the 23-year-old.


    “I’ve lived such a public life that I understand that I’m under a microscope,” she told Entertainment Weekly. “That has taken me into so many different phases. It’s made me depressed and it’s made me happy and it’s made me grateful and humble -- but [I’ve learned] it’s okay to let down my walls with my music, to feel sexy and good.”


     


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    We've seen Angelina Jolie play a sociopath on screen -- after all, she won an Oscar for doing so in 1999's "Girl, Interrupted." Now, we can see her play a similarly devilish character in a much rawer way thanks to a video the Daily Mail unearthed of one of Jolie's acting classes. The site indicates the clip features the actress at age 25, which would put it right around the same time as "Girl, Interrupted." A young Jolie cycles through a range of emotions, none more eerie than the coy smile she employs while uttering the line, "I want to hurt you." A star was born.




     


     


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    I'll be the first to admit -- albeit a bit sheepishly -- that I am a Justin Bieber fan. I saw him in concert when I was 15, in the days of "One Less Lonely Girl" and "Baby," but my true fandom hit all-time highs with "Boyfriend," and skyrocketed with "All That Matters." I've tried to deny it because he's admittedly a bit gross and would probably creep me out if I met him in person, but every time a new Bieber song comes out, I get addicted all over again and have to face the facts: I am a Belieber. So you can imagine my elation when I discovered that Bieber had released a new song, "What Do You Mean," that was not only popular, but the fastest single on record to reach #1 on iTunes. Obviously, I bought it immediately and got ready to be impressed.

    Upon listening, however, my usual dance-crazed, Bieber-obsessed glee quickly dissipated as I tuned into the lyrics. With each verse, I felt a sense of uneasiness that I couldn't quite place. I itched in my skin at the connotation of Bieber's words, despite the uplifting and summery pop beat with which he sang them. The lyrics hit home in a way that made me uncomfortable, the way I'm sure they do for hundreds of other women: imagining -- or rather, remembering -- being in bed with a man and trying to say that you didn't want to go any further, but hearing the inevitable, surprised, and sometimes angry, "what do you mean?"

    Like so many other billboard hits, the catchy pop beat carefully masks a much more unsettling message: that there is a sexual gray area of sorts, where a man can presume to know what a woman is thinking, despite what she says. The song which immediately comes to mind is "Blurred Lines," which was Billboard's #1 song of the summer in 2013 as well as the all-time most-downloaded track in the UK by April 2014, but was later slammed by the media as a "rape anthem" for it's sexually aggressive lyrics. For those who heard nothing of this, let me break it down. "Rape culture" is a term which describes the ways in which society victim-blames and normalizes sexual violence through the use of popular culture -- most often music and films. In the case of "Blurred Lines," Thicke's lyrics contributed to society's victim-blaming mentality by claiming that you can "know" a woman wants it, based on how she dresses or her (perceived) sexual actions.

    Bieber's newest hit, for me at least, had a similar effect. "What do you mean, when you nod your head yes/ But you wanna say no?" Bieber croons in the chorus. "When you don't want me to move/ But you tell me to go." What does she mean when she tells you to go Justin? It sounds to me like she wants you to go, because that's exactly what she said. "What Do You Mean," like "Blurred Lines," points to a consensual ambiguity where a woman's partner takes interpretation into his own hands by presuming (incorrectly) to know what she's thinking -- even when she says otherwise. This can become incredibly dangerous when applied to sexual situations, where a "yes means yes" mentality is imperative: the lyrics perpetuate the idea that unwanted advances or sexual misperceptions are at the fault of the woman because she wasn't clear about her intentions or a man thought she wanted it because she couldn't "make up her mind."

    What I found even more troubling than Bieber's unwarranted assumptions, however, was the last powerful line of each chorus: "Better make up your mind / what do you mean?" Something about the authoritative, commanding nature of the lyric just doesn't sit right with me, especially when coupled with "You're so confusing / be more straightforward" later in the song. Suddenly what could have been a genuine inquiry becomes a question that demands an immediate answer; he doesn't just wonder what she's thinking, he wants her to make up her mind now. Even the ticking-clock sound, which opens the song, lends to its sense of urgency. And for good measure, he tops it off with a little bit of criticism -- "you're so confusing" -- to speed up the process. These lyrics invoke an all-too-common situation in which a woman semi-consents to sex because she feels pressure from her partner to continue, such as being worried there's a time-limit on her decision, or that she will be disparaged for being a tease -- or as Bieber puts it, "indecisive." While it may seem harmless in an upbeat summer single, this pressure is a form of sexual coercion.

    Here's the thing: when it comes to sex, things aren't always black and white. We're allowed to engage in some sexual activities, but not want to go any further. We're allowed to start having sex, and then decide to stop. We're allowed to sleep together sometimes but not want to other times. We're allowed to be indecisive. And moreover, we're allowed these rights without having to face pressure from our partners to immediately "make up our minds." So Bieber, if you still don't know what your girl means, let me give you this answer: you'll know she means "yes" when she explicitly says it.

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    "They do tend to get it right," Brian Hoey, a Queen Elizabeth biographer, told People this week of the writers and producers of "Downton Abbey." Indeed, they've been consulting with Alastiar Bruce, aka Alastair Andrew Bernard Reibey Bruce of Crionaich, since the show got its start to make sure historical details were on point. (No hugging, dears.)


    But still, the Queen "loves to pick out the mistakes," Hoey said.



    The Queen's reaction, we imagine, when she finds an error.

    "The Queen did notice on one episode that there was a young so-called British officer wearing medals which had not been awarded when he was supposed to be alive. He was fighting in the First World War and the medals on his chest did not come in until the Second World War."


    Obviously, she's got an advantage. Her Majesty the "Downton" Fact-Checker will become her nation's longest-serving monarch, surpassing Queen Victoria's reign of 63 years and 216 days, on Sept. 9. That's a lot of time to buff up on British history.


    Other members of the royal family -- including Prince William and Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge -- are known fans of the series. And we can't help but wonder how Buckingham Palace reacted to last season's plotline involving their real-life ancestor, Prince Edward, as the fictional (yet so virtuous) Crawleys went out of their way to protect the royal family from scandal.  


    The next and final season of "Downton Abbey" will premiere in the U.K. on Sept. 20. A trailer promises an onslaught of tear-inducing goodbyes as characters begin to see the late 1920s as the "end of an era." (Non-pirating American viewers will have to wait, as always, for next year.)


     


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    Look, roomies are great. Sure, sometimes they drink all your milk, but it's cool. You were probably planning on eating your cereal with water today anyway. It's cool, guys. It's totally cool.


    On Thursday's "Tonight Show," Jimmy Fallon wanted to know your best #MyRoommateIsWeird stories, and some are so crazy that you'll be glad milk is your biggest roomie problem. (You know, not that glad, but still.)










    You know what else isn't funny? Osteoporosis. Think about that, milk stealers. Just think about that.


    See more of Jimmy Fallon's hashtags.


    "The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon" airs weeknights at 11:35 p.m. ET on NBC.

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    Thursday was a girls' night out for BFFs Kendall Jenner and Hailey Baldwin, who hit up Travis Scott's album release party at Up and Down in New York City. 


    The pair, who recently got matching tattoos,  were spotted getting up close and personal as Baldwin playfully grabbed Jenner's leather-clad butt. 




    Of course, this is the kind of relationship Jenner has with her friends.  If you recall a particularly goofy photo taken in Cannes earlier this year in which Jenner is planting a smooch on Balwin's cheek, you'll remember Josephine Skriver helped the "hand bra" make a rare public appearance when she put her hands on the 19-year-old model's bust. 





     


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    Turns out the best red carpet companion is a dog. 


    Tom Hardy brought his dog Woody to Thursday's premiere of "Legend" at London's Leicester Square. The 37-year-old, whose pregnant wife Charlotte Riley was also in attendance, looked dapper in a three-piece suit with his pup by his side. 



    Needless to say, Woody stole the limelight, chasing pigeons down the carpet and wagging his tail at fans lined up along the barriers. 






    


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