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Celebrity news and blog articles from The Huffington Post

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  • 08/11/15--12:18: A Revelation
  • For as long as I can remember, I've hidden myself. It might have started in school when I realized that I caught on to things a little quicker, and teachers started to show slight favor to me, or use me as an example. I remember feeling like my friends would make fun of me or look at me as if I was different from them and so... I started hiding. Not intentionally, I didn't mean to, but I did. Little pieces at a time.

    I definitely started hiding when I got old enough to walk down my NY streets alone. I started to notice a drastic difference in how men would relate to me if I had on jeans, or if I had on a skirt, or if my hair was done pretty. I could tell the difference, I could feel the animal instinct in them and it scared me. I didn't want to be talked to in that way, looked at in that way, whistled after, followed.

    And so I started hiding. I chose the baggy jeans and Timbs. I chose the ponytail and hat. I chose no makeup, no bright color lipstick or pretty dresses. I chose to hide. Pieces at a time. Less trouble that way.

    I remember feeling that same way when I first started to get recognized as an artist. I had the baggy/braided/tough NY tomboy thing mastered, that was who I was (or who I chose to be), and I felt good there.

    Then, because of the way I spoke or carried myself, people started calling me gay and hard, and I wasn't gay, but I was hard. And although I felt comfortable there, it made me uncomfortable that people were judging me and so slowly I hid that side of myself. I put on dresses and didn't braid my whole head up, so people could see more of the "real" me, even though at that point, I'm sure I was more confused then ever of what the real me was.

    I remember one interview I gave had strong social thoughts from a book I just read. The writer misunderstood me and wrote something that I didn't say. I felt judged by those reading it. Out came the shell again and me under it. Hiding, piece by piece. Little by little. More and more.

    I became comfortable hiding my intelligence, my physical appearance, my truths, my thoughts, myself.

    To this day, every time I get out of the shower to get dressed, I swear the first thought that comes into my head is, what can I wear that won't cause too much attention when I go pick up Egy, or head to the store, or go shopping, or visit a friend, etc.

    And just the other day it hit me! OMG! Alicia! Why are you choosing to be that person? That is so old and outdated! STOP!

    You are allowed to be smart.

    You are allowed to be beautiful.

    You are allowed to be radical and have strong thoughts that others might not agree with.

    You are allowed to be tough.

    You are allowed to be sexy.

    You are allowed to be bold.

    You are allowed to be shapely.

    You are allowed to be kind.

    You are allowed to be yourself!


    And guess what? I can be all these things all at the same time.

    I don't have to give up one to be the other. I don't have to hide anymore, I don't have to pretend and hold back, I don't have to think that my intelligence, beauty and sensuality are intimidating to others.

    Who cares? I don't have to think my silliness, clumsiness or hallmark card optimism, as something I can't be proud of! Who cares?!

    I don't have to try to go unnoticed.

    I don't have to fit in.

    I don't have to close up my thoughts and only speak my truth through songs!

    I can speak it everyday.

    Live it everyday.

    Be it everyday.

    Dress it everyday.

    Show it everyday.

    Grow it everyday!


    I only got 28,000 of those days. So what the fuck am I waiting for??

    And dammit, that's what I'm doing!

    This post originally appeared on AliciaKeys.com.

    -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.












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    Shakira recently felt the special sting that comes with living with a man that knows his way around a soccer ball -- or in this case a small red toy ball.


    In a video the Colombian singer shared via Twitter on Monday, her boyfriend, Gerard Piqué films as he takes a test shot at a wall outside a room where Shakira is calmly looking at her phone. When she stands up and walks towards him asking him about whether the food was ready in Spanish, the FC Barcelona soccer star takes a second shot that hits the singer square in the chest.






    Fortunately for Piqué the “Hips Don’t Lie” singer took it in stride, later sharing the video with her Twitter fans -- but let's hope Piqué didn't actually intend to hit the singer.


    Fortunately for the couple, soccer balls in their home can also be used in adorable ways. As was the case a week ago when their youngest son Sasha turned six months old:



    Happy 6 months Sasha! Shak

    A video posted by Shakira (@shakira) on




    On Shakira's scoreboard that's: Sasha 1, Dad 0.


    Also on HuffPost: 


    -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.












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    Newly-winged Victoria's Secret angel Kate Grigorieva took to Instagram to share photos from her wedding in Russia over the weekend. They came complete with a dreamy setting, a regal veil and a dress from David's Bridal.



    In her Instagram caption, she thanked Zac Posen for the long-sleeve, trumpet-style gown. A rep for the designer confirmed that the dress is part of his Truly Zac Posen collection for David's Bridal; it retails for $1,350.



    Fellow model Irina Sharipova, pictured on the far left, served as a bridesmaid and also shared some snaps from the happy day. 




    Congrats to the happy couple!


    Also on HuffPost Weddings: 


    -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.












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    As soon as I finished reading Gone Girl last summer, I immediately went on IMDb to see which actors would be playing the film version's supporting roles. I did a double-take when I saw who would be playing Andie, the writing student with whom Nick (Ben Affleck) is having an affair: The role had gone to Emily Ratajkowski, the supermodel who had gotten everyone hot and bothered the summer before with her appearance in the music video for Robin Thicke's "Blurred Lines."

    On what planet is Emily Ratajkowski a sweet, girl-next-door who lives in a small Missouri town and takes classes at the local college? Had the film cast even a slightly plainer actress -- or even one with smaller tits -- I would have had a much easier time believing in the hum-drum Midwest world that otherwise translated so well from page to screen.

    A new adaptation of another Gillian Flynn novel, Dark Places, released on Friday, has a similar problem. The film has an excellent cast: Charlize Theron, Nicholas Hoult, Christina Hendricks, and Chloë Grace Moretz star in this story of a woman whose 15-year-old brother was sent to jail for killing her entire family when she was seven years old. Now, in her early 30s, friendless, jobless and broke, Libby Day (Theron) agrees to help the members of the "Kill Club" -- true-crime fetishists who believe that Libby's brother, Ben, was wrongfully convicted -- find out what really happened that night on the family's Kansas farmhouse in 1985.

    Like Gone Girl, much of Dark Places (the novel, at least) focuses on the media frenzy surrounding victimized women. In the book's opening pages, Libby, the narrator, sardonically describes the treatment she got as the only surviving child of the "Kinnakee Kansas Farm Massacre": "I was big news. The Enquirer put my tearful photo on the front page with the deadline ANGEL FACE." Lyle Wirth (Hoult), the president of the Kill Club, tells Libby she and her family are "huge. Bigger'n JonBenét."

    In the novel, there are repeated references to Lisette Stephens, "a pretty twenty-five-year-old brunette" from Kansas City who's gone missing. On her way to visit her brother in prison for the first time, Libby notices several posters for other missing girls. "Both girls were unkempt," she notices, "surly, which explained why they weren't getting the Lisette Stephens treatment. I made a mental note to take a smiling, pretty photo of myself in case I ever disappeared."

    The public's obsession with not just missing girls but pretty, palatable missing girls is a through-line in Flynn's work. A female victim is immeasurably more sympathetic if she's adorable. In Sharp Objects, Flynn's debut, the adult narrator recalls the summer her 13-year-old sister died, the summer she "became quite suddenly, unmistakably beautiful ... And people loved me. I was no longer the pity case (with, how weird, the dead sister). I was the pretty girl (with, how sad, the dead sister). And so I was popular."

    The casting of Dark Places only underscores Flynn's point about this kind of selective pity. Libby's mother Patty, shown in scenes that flash back to the day of the murders, is described in the book as nice-looking, but plain: "She was thirty-two but looked a decade older. Her forehead was creased like a child's paper fan, and crow's feet rayed out from her eyes. Her red hair was shot with white, wiry threads, and she was unattractively thin, all bumps and points, like she'd swallowed a shelf's worth of hardware ... She did not look like the kind of person you'd want to hug."

    In the film, Patty is played by Hendricks. She's made to look worn-out, for sure -- her stringy hair looks like it hasn't been washed in a couple days, and her clothing is simple. But she's still Christina Hendricks, with her bodacious curves, plump lips, and mascaraed eyes. She looks beautiful.

    Likewise, the film casts the lovely Chloë Grace Moretz as Diondra, teenage Ben's bratty, rich girlfriend. In the book, Diondra has "brown spiraly curls all crunchy with gel." She wears "heavy makeup" and baggy sweaters to cover up her pregnant belly. In the film, Diondra has wavy, messy-sexy hair and wears a skin-tight, short black dress that shows of Moretz's long legs. Even the casting of Hoult as Lyle feels off -- Flynn writes that Lyle "looked like a serial killer" and has him sporting "wavy, mousy hair he'd tried to tame with too much gel in all the wrong places," glasses, and "jeans that were skinny, but not in a cool way, just in a tight way." In the film, Hoult just looks like his usual hunky self.

    And, of course, there's Charlize Theron. Adult Libby is not unattractive in the novel, but she's got a bad dye job, her red roots poking through "like my scalp was bleeding," and a "baby face." You can crop her hair short and stick a trucker hat on her head, as in the film, but that's no match for the ferocity of Theron's beauty.

    Theron, Moretz, Hoult and Hendricks are just too attractive. They're supposed to be small-town Kansas folk, but they all look like unmistakable products of Los Angeles. If this is what it takes to get audiences interested in stories about regular Midwesterners, then "Dark Places" the movie unwittingly proves Flynn's cynicism correct.

    -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.












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    Kim Kardashian may have broken the Internet (again) with her nude pregnancy photo on Instagram, but Naya Rivera posed for her own sexy pregnancy shoot, too.  


    The former "Glee" actress, who's often compared to the reality TV star, stripped down for a series of sensual photos on Yahoo, which were shot by photographer Brian Bowen Smith. 


    In one of the pictures she appears almost as a silhouette, wearing a tight black dress with her hand on her back. In the other, she's wearing nothing but a large fur stole as she holds her growing belly with her left hand. Both Naya and celebrity hairstylist Clyde Haygood shared photos from the shoot on Instagram.



    Check out my pregnancy shoot with @yahoo! I love that I have been able to share this special journey with you.

    A photo posted by Naya Rivera Dorsey (@nayarivera) on




    A photo posted by Clyde Haygood (@clydehairgod) on



    Rivera, who married Ryan Dorsey last year, also shared a behind-the-scenes snap from the shoot, with the caption, "Deep in glam thought." 



    In her interview with Yahoo, the expectant star talks about the surprises of pregnancy and leaning on her friends for support


    "It’s such a change physically, mentally and in terms of lifestyle, that I definitely didn’t know what to expect going into it. I have friends who are moms, and you hear stories and stuff, but it’s never the same until you actually experience it yourself," she said. 


    "My friends have been a great support group. It turns out that, like, all of my friends ended up getting pregnant around the same time I did -- so we’re kind of all learning together, and we text daily about what else is new, or what’s different, or what’s aggravating us," Rivera continued. "So we’re all kind of in it together, which is great. We have this kind of built-in mom group now." 


    You can read the whole thing on Yahoo


     


    Also on HuffPost: 



    For a constant stream of entertainment news and discussion, follow HuffPost Entertainment on Viber.

    -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.












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    John waters smoke


    Talking with John Waters: Endlessly funny, erudite, charming and so well-read, just try to keep up (he reads two books a week). I was thrilled to interview him for Sight & Sound's September issue. I won't publish the entire, long and entertaining interview here, this is just a teaser. You'll need to go out and buy the magazine. But, to whet your appetite, here are excerpts. Enjoy.


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    Kim Morgan: I know this question is asked of a lot of filmmakers, but it's interesting, especially when it comes to you, because you have so many interests and influences and innovations of your own. So, what did make you pick up a camera to shoot film?


    John Waters: I'll tell you my influences. I was a puppeteer for children's birthday parties, and so William Castle was an influence. I'd try to throw all of those gimmicks in there. Somehow I got my hand on the Village Voice and started reading Jonas Mekas's column and that opened up the world of underground movies that I knew nothing about. I read about Warhol and Paul Morrissey and Kenneth Anger and, more than anybody, the Kuchar brothers. I used to run away to New York all the time, on the greyhound bus, and make up lies that I was going to a fraternity weekend or something and then go see these movies. I wanted to be an underground filmmaker. But at the same time, during my teenage years, we went to the drive-in almost every night, and in Baltimore they tested every kind of '-ploitation': 'hicksploitation', 'blacksploitation', 'goresploitation', I mean amazing stuff.


    William-Castle


    I also used to go to the Rex Theatre in Baltimore. They were fighting with the censor board all the time, and they had both nudist camp movies, and Ingmar Bergman! They'd show Monica's Hot Summer [Summer with Monika] Then they would cut out most of the dialogue and just leave the bare tits scenes in, so, those movies I was seeing too. All of those exploitation movies and Bergman.


    I love Bergman. I still love Bergman. I still just think of Brink of Life [1957], my favorite Bergman: three pregnant women in a maternity ward. I used to go to this college nearby, Delta College, and they showed every Bergman movie. I'd steal books and watch Bergman. I used to take Divine on acid and make him go to Bergman movies. And he would get so mad. I always remember, The Hour of the Wolf [1968], where she rips her face off and Divine was like, "That's it. I'm not lookin' at these movies ever again! I want to see movies about rich people!"


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    KM: When thinking of Female Trouble [in which Divine's character is disfigured in an acid attack and then taken to a local beauty salon where the owners find her new look inspired], I think of today, when so many people change their faces through extreme measures, and tabloid culture, how we follow celebrity crime...


    JW: Nobody's shot up liquid eyeliner yet!


    KM: It's on its way! But, this idea in Female Trouble that crime and beauty are the same seems so relevant to me, especially now...


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    JW: That was all Genet. That was what I read in high school, he was a big influence on me. And I always say, "Everybody looks better under arrest." I still visit people in prison, I taught in prison. In my book Role Models [2010] I wrote a pretty serious thing about parole regarding one of the Manson women [Leslie Van Houten], who looks back in horror about it. So, I've always been interested in extreme behaviour. I would follow the Boston Bomber case mostly because I wanted to know what happened to the ex-wife of the one that died? She then remarried, supposedly, and has a child! I always say, "God. She has a boyfriend? Where did she find a new boyfriend? Where did she date?"


    KM: Your movies tweak genres and conventions and even labels. What do you think of certain labels? Like camp? Or melodrama?


    JW: Well, melodrama, I like. Camp, I've said a million times: "No one says that word anymore do they?" Even kitsch. That's like old queens talking about Rita Hayworth. And there's nothing the matter with old queens talking about Rita Hayworth, I'd probably like to hear that. I haven't heard that in a while. But I don't even say trash anymore. The punk movement never died... a lot of the punk world was gay. It was a great look for gay disguise. And it was a great look for really unattractive people. And goth. So I always loved that style, because if you were not a traditional beauty, or even if, by society's standards, you were ugly or had a body type that wasn't thought of as sexy, you could work it in the punk world and come across with a great look and be a star. So, I always felt comfortable in that world.


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    KM: It makes me think of how you view your characters and shoot them - like Edith Massey, an, unusual, interesting looking woman and, so, photographs wonderfully. Who were the photographers who inspired you?


    JW: Oh, Diane Arbus. The hugest influence on me, way before Pecker. If you look at that one shot, the woman who looks like Divine in Female Trouble, she's holding a child and the other child is drooling, we looked at that picture. That was a direct quote, basically. Diane Arbus was a huge, huge, huge influence...


    Diane Arbus


    KM: Tennessee Williams, who we brought up before, was also an influence...


    JW: Oh, he saved me. Because when I first read him, I realized there was bohemia. Nobody had ever told me what that was and that's what I always wanted, and still want. That was the world I was trying to find.


    KM: And Williams didn't define himself as one thing. One thing that might become problematic is when things are labeled too easily...


    JW: I agree. I'm against separatism. That's what I said in my commencement speech. Separatism is defeat.


    KM: The term political correctness is over-used, to the point where it starts to lose meaning, especially among liberals; it's either a pejorative or not a pejorative. You've seen people rebelling on all sides of the spectrum, and when the term didn't exist...


    6a00d83451cb7469e201b7c7bc53cf970b-800wi


    JW: I am politically correct. I am completely politically correct.


    KM: Yes. But there's got to be something beyond, perhaps? Like in your recent commencement speech you said, "Being gay is not enough anymore."


    JW: It's not. In rich kid schools? Being straight... they're the ones who should be marching. As a gay man in the arts, do I ever feel prejudice? No. But, if I was gay maybe in a poor neighborhood in a poor kids' school? Yes, then it can be a problem. It's a class issue now. What's happening now, with rich kids, they pretend they're gay when they're not. But then you have to do it. So, I don't care. I mean, "Eatin' pussy for politics." You still have to do it.


    Read my entire interview at Sight & Sound, in which he discusses further thoughts on Female Trouble, Divine's dislike of hot wigs, the huge influence of Ike & Tina Turner, Tab Hunter's bravery, Johnny Depp, Patty Hearst, Hairspray, Serial Mom (and more movies), how he learned filmmaking from teamsters, the movie industry today, his love of Freddie Francis's Trog, Derek Jarman's Blue and Joseph Losey's Boom!, among other British films he programmed along with his own BFI retrospective which is showing all of his films (every damn one), and how his next project will probably be for TV -- even though he never watches TV. Well, except for The Wire, he watched that religiously. Pick up the September issue now


    Read more KimMorgan at Sunset Gun.


     


     

    -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.












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    Remember scratching your head when Paul Haggis' "Crash" won Oscars for Best Picture and Best Original Screenplay in 2006? Sadly, us too.


    The 2005 film, starring Sandra Bullock, Don Cheadle, Michael Peña, Thandie Newton, Ryan Phillippe and a long list of others, thrived on the gimmick of interconnecting a bunch of different storylines throughout Los Angeles. If anything, you likely remember how the film came under fire for its racial stereotyping and the responses that followed its Oscars win. But don't worry, Haggis, who wrote and directed "Crash," doesn't exactly agree his film deserved the golden statuette, either.


    In a recent interview with HitFix about his upcoming HBO miniseries "Show Me A Hero," Haggis reflected on his double-Oscar win ("Crash" also won Hughes Winborne an Academy Award that year for Best Editing). "Was it the best film of the year?  I don’t think so," Haggis told HitFix before listing off the other great nominees from that year, which included Ang Lee's "Brokeback Mountain," Bennett Miller's "Capote," George Clooney's "Good Night, and Good Luck" and Steven Spielberg's "Munich." "I mean please," Haggis said, "what a year."


    While the director says he's proud his film touched people enough to earn an award, he doesn't think it should've won. "I'm very glad to have those Oscars," Haggis said. "But you shouldn’t ask me what the best film of the year was because I wouldn’t be voting for 'Crash,' only because I saw the artistry that was in the other films."


    Regardless of award show recognition and backlash, does the filmmaker believe he made a "great" film in retrospect? "I don’t know," he told the website. And that, ladies and gentleman, is the sound of the final nail in the "Crash" coffin (we hope).


    For the full interview, head to HitFix.


    Also on HuffPost:



    For a constant stream of entertainment news and discussion, follow HuffPost Entertainment on Viber.

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    Britney Spears is headed to the small screen.


    The pop star tweeted on Tuesday that she'll guest star on The CW's "Jane the Virgin," which is apparently one of the "Pretty Girls" singer's "favorite shows ever."




    "Jane" showrunner Jennie Urman soon after confirmed the news on Twitter, writing that it was a "dream come true."





    Spears will appear on the show as Rogelio's (Jaime Camil) "nemesis" in the fifth episode of Season 2, according to the network. In a statement, Urman said, "Personally, after hearing about their long standing feud (from Rogelio's point of view), we are eager to hear Ms. Spears' side of the story, which we assume is quite different. #TeamBritney."


    How excited is "Jane" star Gina Rodriguez that the "... Baby One More Time" singer is headed to her show?





    Camil can't wait to hear Spears' side of the story either.




    "Jane the Virgin" returns on Oct. 12 at 9:00 p.m. ET on The CW.


    Also on HuffPost:



    For a constant stream of entertainment news and discussion, follow HuffPost Entertainment on Viber.

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    “It wasn’t over. It still isn’t over," Ryan Gosling's Noah tells Rachel McAdams' Allie before their kiss in the rain in "The Notebook." And clearly, it's still not over.


    Apparently, the tears we've been crying since the movie's 2004 release aren't enough. Now, The CW is developing a small screen adaptation of the film, which was based on the Nicholas Sparks novel of the same name. According to Entertainment Weekly, the official logline follows Noah and Allie at the beginning of their relationship amid the "racial politics, economic inequities, and social mores of post-World War II of the late 1940s in North Carolina."


    So wait, does that mean Noah won't enlist in the war, thus prompting James Marsden's Lon to come and ruin everything sweep Allie off her feet? What about the Alzheimer's plot device? Will old Noah tell old Allie he'll "be seeing" her so we can plow through a box of tissues? CW President Mark Pedowitz revealed at the Television Critics Association summer press tour on Tuesday that "Notebook" fans shouldn't count on seeing the aged Allie and Noah. “I don’t believe we’re going to see the older couple -- what they become," he said, before adding that things can change since the project is in early development.


    For more, head to EW.


     Also on HuffPost:



    For a constant stream of entertainment news and discussion, follow HuffPost Entertainment on Viber.

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    After more than six seasons, "Pretty Little Liars" has FREAKING FINALLY revealed the identity of stalker/tormenter "A." 


    ALERT ALERT SPOILER ALERT: The following post contains MAJOR MAJOR SPOILERS for "Pretty Little Liars" Season 6's mid-season finale, "Game Over, Charles."


    'A' is CeCe. 


     CeCe was formerly known as Charles. 


    A whole lot of other things were also revealed in the info-packed episode. Some key takeaways: 



    -Mona killed Bethany. 


    -Bethany killed Marion, and blamed it on CeCe.


    -Jessica orchestrated a coverup which made the police falsely declare Marion's death a suicide. 


    -Sara Harvey is Red Coat and Black Widow because they are boringly the same person. (Guess her old school friends were right about her being a MEAN MEAN girl.) 

     

    -CeCe hit Ali on the head "that night" thinking it was Bethany.

     


    This is a developing, highly important news story of the century.


    Also on HuffPost: 


     


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    After so so so so so so so so so so much waiting, "Pretty Little Liars" finally revealed the identity of "A" in Tuesday night's episode. ALERT: MAJOR SPOILERS BELOW for "Pretty Little Liars" Season 6's mid-season finale, "Game Over, Charles." 


    Now that we know A is CeCe (!), and the mysteries of the past six seasons are supposedly put to rest (we say supposedly because, um, there's still a lot we don't know), we can look forward to next season's time jump, when we'll pick up with the liars one year after college.


    Though we have the long hiatus ahead of us before we really delve into the future storyline, Tuesday night's episode (and a vague trailer) gave us a teensy tiny glimpse into where the liars will be after five years of living without a psycho stalker tormenter constantly on their backs. Here's what we (kind of sort of) know:


     Aria


    Wearing less skulls.


    Spencer


    New bangs! More adult version of preppy style! 


    Hanna


    LONG HAIR. DON'T CARE. FLEEK.


    Emily 


    College wasn't what she thought it was going to be. 


    Ali (honorary liar)


    Ali is maybe a teacher? But someone is after her? And then bad stuff starts happening again? Ugh.


    And with that, we wish you a happy A-free hiatus. When we're back, we'll get a taste of life with 22-year old liars who can legally drink and date 20-somethings without it being super creepy and illegal. 


    Happy A-day! 


    Also on HuffPost: 


     


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    In quite possibly the saddest movie news you will read today, Uggie, who became famous as "The Dog" from 2011's "The Artist," has died. TMZ reported that the 13-year-old Jack Russell Terrier was put to sleep on Friday.


    Uggie's owner and trainer, Omar von Muller, confirmed the news on Facebook Wednesday morning. "We regret to inform to all our friends, family and Uggie's fans that our beloved boy has passed away," von Muller wrote. The owner said he didn't plan to release the news of Uggie's passing, but someone leaked it to TMZ. "In short, Uggie had a cancerous tumor in the prostate and is now in a better place not feeling pain. Thank you for your support." 



    We regret to inform to all our friends, family and Uggie's fans that our beloved boy has passed away. We were not...

    Posted by Omar von Muller on Tuesday, August 11, 2015

    Uggie wasn't just any movie dog, though. He was a Cannes Award-winning movie dog who was awarded the Palm Dog for his role in "The Artist." He even wrote his own memoir and became Nintendo's first-ever spokesdog after he retired from movies.


    We'll miss you Uggie, the best pup Hollywood's ever known.




    Also on HuffPost:



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    Anna Faris got candid when discussing recent tabloid gossip about her husband Chris Pratt cheating on her with Jennifer Lawrence. 


    "I had always kind of believed that part of the rumors of celebrity couples were sort of true because they had never been part of my life," Faris told Us Weekly at the TCA Stars Party Monday. "I was like, 'Oh, maybe there's a kernel of truth to that.' It's been a little devastating because for us, it's like, 'What the heck?' This has been blindsiding to us. We have an incredible relationship. It has been weirdly stinging.” 


    Star magazine published a story last month claiming Faris was worried about Pratt starring opposite Lawrence in the upcoming sci-fi flick "Passengers." The tabloid alleged that after Pratt and Lawrence had dinner to discuss the film, "he hasn’t been able to stop raving about how cool Jen is" and their on-camera chemistry landed them the roles. 


    “[That] stung a little bit harder than I thought it would,” Faris told Us. 


    The two married back in 2009 and are parents to son Jack. The "Jurassic World" star has gushed about his wife, saying they purposefully find time for date nights and make the effort for each other.  


    "I have the support of a strong partner who's been through this and understands it and whom I can share these experiences with," he told People magazine in June. "And we have a family that we're starting that’s the focus of my attention."


     


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    On Wednesday, Christina Aguilera shared a topless photo of herself on Instagram, explaining to her 1 million followers that she "felt like it was time to start sharing some personal stuff with you guys." Well, it doesn't get much more personal than this, does it? 


    Also, she noted, "it's just the beginning."



    Stay tuned. 


     


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    What do you think of when you see the word "Tinder"? Okay, don't answer that. What about "Lenny Kravitz"? Okay, don't answer that either.


    Welcome to the game "Word Blurt," the word association game where you blurt out the first thing that comes to mind.


    On Tuesday night, Kristen Stewart stopped by "The Tonight Show" to promote her new film "American Ultra."  Then, she and Jimmy Fallon played a revealing game of "Word Blurt."


     


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    Detroit Lions wide receiver Ryan Broyles is not blowing through his multimillion-dollar NFL paycheck. 


    The football star told ESPN that he and his wife live on a $60,000-a-year budget, "give or take," with the rest going to strategic investments and retirement savings. He consulted with a financial advisor after signing a $3.6 million contract in 2012 with $1.422 million guaranteed. 


    "Then you know how much you can invest, how risky you can be," the 27-year-old, who drives a Mazda, told ESPN. "Then, when I was hitting the same budget over three, four, five months, it was all right, this is what your budget is and I had some spending money."


    "When I come to work, I don't think about the money, man," he added. "I can tell you that, without a doubt. There might be some guys that do but I put myself in a position where I come out here and have fun. I don't have that pressure, you know what I mean. My wife has no worries. My child has no worries. For the most part, I can help my family, you know."


    Broyles tweeted that he is "overwhelmed" by the support and kudos he has received following the ESPN interview. And had some more words of wisdom:





     The Oklahoma native was signed to the Lions in the second-selection, 54th overall, during the 2012 NFL Draft. This is the final year of his rookie contract


     


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    "Pretty Little Liars" may not officially be over -- we still have a whole season and a half to get through -- but Lucy Hale is ready to move on to more "grown up" things. 


    The 26-year-old appears in a new photo shoot for V magazine, in which she finally got to show the world that she is, in fact, not a teenager. Since we're used to seeing her decked out in pretty crazy outfits on the ABC Family show, these images seem understated, though definitely sexy, in comparison. 


    "I was really excited to do something a lot more grown up and show a different side of me," Hale explained to the magazine. 


    In the pictures, which were shot by photographer James Lee Wall, Hale is kind of giving off a "walk of shame" vibe. In one snap, she's seemingly walking away from someone (or someone's apartment) wearing only a shirt and a pair of stilettos as she looks back  over her shoulder. In another shot, we see her sprawled out on a bed wearing lingerie with a man on the other side, lying his body over the mattress. 





    In her interview with the mag, Hale talked about what she's hoping to get out of life after "PLL." 


    "I'll be done next October with ["Pretty Little Liars"] forever, which is exciting, but also scary at the same time because it's the next chapter of my life and so I'm really looking forward to exploring different and darker roles," she said. 


    She's set to star in an upcoming indie film, which she'll start shooting this fall.


    "That's sort of the direction I want to head in. It's a little raunchy, so it'll be exciting," she explained.  But don't worry "PLL" fans, it won't be too over the top.


    "You know, the fans of the show have sort of grown up with me, so it's a movie they can watch, but we'll push the envelope a little bit on it. It's a movie that's got a lot of heart, and morals, but the language! I get to drop the f-bomb every other line, which will be fun. This will be my first lead in a movie, which will be very exciting for me." 


    You can check out the rest of Hale's photo shoot, and read her entire interview, at VMagazine.com. 


     


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    It's hard to imagine that an actor as talented as Morgan Freeman would ever have trouble landing any role he auditioned for, but the 78-year-old Hollywood veteran says that's exactly what happened during his earlier days as a young artist. It was the 1980s, he said, and Freeman was struck by the lack of parts for African-American actors -- but it wasn't this scarcity that cost him jobs; it was his outspokenness about it.


    As Freeman told "Oprah's Master Class" in the above video, he had made a promise to himself before he ever got into acting, based on all the movies he used to watch as a young black man living in Chicago.


    "I went to the movies all the time. I've seen the movies. And at some point, it struck me rather dramatically how much I wasn't in the movies, not the way I needed to be in the movies," Freeman said. "If you look at a lot of the disaster movies in that period, the only people left on the planet were white. Now, my thing is, if I get in the movies, I want to make sure that I speak about that."


    It's a vow he kept, even calling out the lack of prominent African-American roles in the middle of auditions. One of those memorable moments happened when Freeman had the opportunity to appear in a remake of "The Thing."


    "I read the script, and I go back for the audition. The producer or director, one of those, said, 'Did you read the script?... What did you think?'" Freeman recalled. "I said, 'Well, you've got 11 people at the South Pole. Eight of them are scientists. Then you have a cook, a mechanic and something else; they're all black. None of the scientists are. What do you think I think?'


    "Needless to say, I didn't get that job," he continued, with a chuckle. "So, there was a period there in the early '80s when I didn't get any work."


    Then, in the late '80s, Freeman was cast in the Academy Award-winning film "Glory," about the first formal military unit comprised of all African-American men. It was a role he was truly proud of.


    "I was just floored, because I knew about the 54th Massachusetts Regiment," Freeman said. "The history is there to draw upon, but we've got to ask ourselves -- 'we,' me, black people -- why don't we figure more in it?"


    Since then, of course, Freeman has appeared in many acclaimed films, from "The Shawshank Redemption" to "The Dark Knight Rises." And, as he decided at the start of his career, Freeman hasn't compromised his personal values. Even today, the actor continues to follow his principles through his path of success.


    "I need something that's going to engage me, that makes me sit up and think," Freeman said. "I refuse to take part in anything that is going to denigrate a people. Especially me."


    Related: Freeman describes the moment he realized he wanted to leave the military and pursue a career in acting.


    "Oprah's Master Class" returns for its fifth season on Sunday, Oct. 25, at 8 p.m. ET. Upcoming masters include Ellen DeGeneres, Robert Duvall, Dwayne "the Rock" Johnson, Smokey Robinson, Jeff Bridges, James Taylor and Patti LaBelle.


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    "Game of Thrones" star Natalie Dormer knows that, unfortunately, looks are everything when it comes to the film and TV industry.


    In a recent interview with Radio Times, the actress responded to Emma Thompson's previous comments about ageism and sexism in film. Thompson told the website last month that "some forms of sexism and unpleasantness to women have become more entrenched and indeed more prevalent," and that overall, opportunities for women are "still completely s**t." But Dormer added that, in her experience, male actors face just as much objectification as women. "My personal experience has been to work on phenomenal jobs in which the men are objectified as much as the women. Actors suffer from it, too," Dormer told Radio Times, before citing the recent craze over Irish actor Aidan Turner's body in BBC's "Poldark."


    Dormer, who has had nude scenes as Margaery Tyrell on "Thrones," realizes that all actors aren't just judged by their body size, but also on looks in general. "We're not just talking about being slim here. We're talking about character actors with big eyes getting typecast in the 'friend' role," Dormer said. "It's not just about bed-ability: it's about your physicality more generally."


    But Dormer isn't the only actor from the HBO series who thinks men are objectified for their bodies. Kit Harington told Page Six earlier this year that he finds being labeled a hunk "demeaning."


    "It really is, and it’s in the same way as it is for women," Harington said. "When an actor is seen only for her physical beauty, it can be quite offensive." So Jon Snow does know one thing: he doesn't want you to call him a hunk as much as he doesn't want you to call Dormer (and other women) a "babe."


    For more, head to Radio Times.


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    Kristen Stewart feels no need to define her sexuality for inquiring minds. 


    “Google me, I’m not hiding," Stewart told Nylon magazine. But she is not pandering to the speculation about her sexual orientation. 



    If you feel like you really want to define yourself, and you have the ability to articulate those parameters and that in itself defines you, then do it. But I am an actress, man. I live in the fucking ambiguity of this life and I love it. I don’t feel like it would be true for me to be like, ‘I’m coming out!’ No, I do a job. Until I decide that I’m starting a foundation or that I have some perspective or opinion that other people should be receiving … I don’t. I’m just a kid making movies.



    She was more explicit about her ideals regarding sexual fluidity, however. 


    “I think in three or four years, there are going to be a whole lot more people who don’t think it’s necessary to figure out if you’re gay or straight. It’s like, just do your thing," she said. 


    The 25-year-old's love life has been at the center of speculation since she was first photographed out with her personal assistant, Alicia Cargile, last year. Her sexuality further became headline fodder in June after Mirror reporter Sharon Feinstein claimed Stewart's mom outed her daughter during an interview. Jules Stewart later disputed the quotes.   


    Read more from Stewart's interview over at Nylon



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