Are you the publisher? Claim or contact us about this channel


Embed this content in your HTML

Search

Report adult content:

click to rate:

Account: (login)

More Channels


Showcase


Channel Catalog


Channel Description:

Celebrity news and blog articles from The Huffington Post

older | 1 | .... | 716 | 717 | (Page 718) | 719 | 720 | .... | 764 | newer

    0 0


    LONDON (AP) — Big-voiced British singer Cilla Black, a product of Beatles-era Liverpool who became a national treasure over a 50-year music and television career, has died. She was 72.


    Spanish police said Sunday that the singer died Saturday at her home in Estepona, southern Spain. Black's spokesman, Nick Fiveash, confirmed her death and said details would be released after a coroner's report was completed.


    Black was born Priscilla White in Liverpool, northwest England, in 1943. As a teenager she sang part-time and worked in the cloakroom of the Cavern Club, where her musical talent was spotted by rising local stars The Beatles.


    Signed by the Fab Four's manager, Brian Epstein, she had a string of hits starting in 1964 with "Anyone Who Had a Heart," written by Burt Bacharach and Hal David, and "You're My World." Both went to No. 1 in Britain, and the latter also charted in the U.S.


    She also had success with the Bacharach-David theme tune for the 1966 film "Alfie," and recorded several Beatles songs, including "The Long and Winding Road."


    By the late '60s she was famous enough to be known by her first name alone, and hosted a BBC variety show, "Cilla."


    With her reliable good cheer and tireless work ethic, Black was a TV natural. Her catchphrase — delivered in a strong Liverpool accent that replaced the letter "t'' with "r'' — was "a lorra, lorra laughs."


    She became a British television fixture as the cheeky, cheery host of matchmaking game show "Blind Date" (between 1985 and 2003) and heartwarming-reunion program "Surprise Surprise" (between 1984 and 2001).


    "She always felt like a friend in your living room, on your TV screen," television executive Michael Grade told Sky News.


    In a tweet, her friend Joan Collins called Black "a resplendent and rare talent."


    Black's husband of 30 years, Bobby Willis, died in 1999. She is survived by their three sons.


    Also on HuffPost:


    -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.












    0 0


    Valerie Harper is recovering after she was hospitalized for an illness on Wednesday. The veteran actress took to her Facebook page Saturday to clarify that, contrary to reports, she is not in a coma and suggested her hospitalization was caused by medication that "didn't agree" with her:




    The 75-year-old, who has battled cancer, was starring in the musical "Nice Work If You Can Get It" at the Ogunquit Playhouse in Maine. The theater said Brenda Vaccaro will take over for Harper for the remainder of the play in a statement released Saturday


    “Valerie is feeling great right now and we want her to continue to rest and to enjoy her family. After discussing with them, we decided that we wanted to relieve her of any pressure of having to return to the show, which only runs for two more weeks," the statement read.


    Best wishes for a speedy recovery. 


    Also on HuffPost:


    -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.












    0 0

    Last week, the world collectively cringed after watching Cara Delevingne's painfully awkward interview with two tone-deaf morning show hosts while she was promoting her new film, "Paper Towns."


    After calling her the wrong name, the hosts asked Delevingne if she "needed a nap" when she looked understandably disenchanted when asked if she had read the book the film is based on.


    The model-turned-actress took to Twitter to defend herself, and Paper Towns author John Green suggested that it was sexist of the hosts to ask Delevingne if she had read the book.


    Now, it looks like Delevingne is ready to laugh the whole thing off, as she seemingly poked fun at the incident on Instagram on Saturday: 



    I JUST FOUND THIS BOOK! ITS AWESOME!

    A photo posted by Cara Delevingne (@caradelevingne) on



    Got 'em!


    In other Delevingne news, the 22-year-old was spotted rocking pink tresses at her girlfriend St. Vincent's show in Montreal over the weekend. It's probably just a wig, but she's totally pulling it off either way.


    Also on HuffPost: 


    -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.












    0 0


    Hot on the heels of her steamy spread in Complex magazine, Khloe Kardashian has revealed she's lost about 35 pounds from hitting the gym. 


    The 31-year-old told Australian radio show "Fitzy & Wippa" on Friday about her weight loss journey.


    "I've lost like, 35 pounds. I don't really weigh myself ... but I know how I want to feel in clothes and it does become addicting once you start losing weight and seeing results. I want to see more," she said. 


    Kardashian recently slammed critics who accused her sexy Complex shoot of being digitally altered, posting an unretouched photo alongside the one that appeared in the magazine:



    If you need us, we'll be on the treadmill. 


    Also on HuffPost:


    -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.












    0 0

    UPDATE: The posters below feature unofficial art and were not released by the studio. 


    The first posters for Tom Hooper's "The Danish Girl" are here and they're beautiful. 


     The upcoming drama stars Academy Award-winning actor Eddie Redmayne as transgender icon Lili Elbe, the first person to undergo a successful gender confirmation surgery. Earlier this year, we got our first glimpse of the actor in character as the Danish artist, and the newly released posters are just as striking.


    In two of the images, Redmayne is pictured alongside co-star Alicia Vikander, while in a third image, he appears alone, a scarf draped around his neck and red lipstick on his lips. All of the images feature the tagline, "Find the courage to be yourself." 





    Redmayne and Vikander were cast after a slew of other actresses (Nicole Kidman, Marion Cotillard, Charlize Theron, Gwyneth Paltrow) were rumored to be attached to the project. The role follows Redmayne's Oscar-winning portrayal of Stephen Hawking in "The Theory of Everything" and his part as Balem Abrasax in "Jupiter Ascending."


    "The Danish Girl" is based on David Ebershoff's 2000 novel of the same name. Considering all the recent news surrounding the LGBTQ community (with help from people like Caitlyn Jenner, Laverne Cox and Jazz Jennings), the film is being released at a timely moment in our culture. Here's to hoping it helps continue the discussion about the struggles faced by transgender individuals in today's society.


    "The Danish Girl" is slated to hit theaters in 2016. 


    Also on HuffPost:


    -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.












    0 0

    Hot damn, Emily Ratajkowski!


    The model appears on the September 2015 issue of British GQ and both covers (yes, there are two) are downright smokin'. The photos, which she shared on Instagram, were shot by Mario Testino and styled by Katie Grand.


    In one shot, the "Blurred Lines" video girl is seen wearing a dangerously low-cut top and latex gloves while biting down on a silver chain. It's very "Fifty Shades of Grey," to say the least.



    A photo posted by Emily Ratajkowski (@emrata) on



    In the other shot, the brunette beauty, who the magazine dubbed "Instagram's It-girl," is seen holding a tube of lipstick between her teeth like a cigar. 



    A photo posted by Emily Ratajkowski (@emrata) on



    Inside the issue, the model-turned-actress opens up about the whole "Blurred Lines"-Marvin Gaye controversy, legalizing drugs and what it means (to her) to be a sexual person and feminist.


    "Making sure you get what you want in sex. And feeling sexual without feeling like it's for someone else ... Being in love and acting sexually on it in a million different ways is empowering," she said.  "I love men's butts. I shouldn't have to feel embarrassed of that." 


    You can head over to British GQ's website to read more or pick up a copy of the magazine when it hits newsstands on Aug. 6. 


    Also on HuffPost:


    -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.












    0 0

    Oh, to be a fly on the wall for a girls' night out with two of country's biggest stars. 


    Shania Twain and Miranda Lambert spent some quality time together after Lambert came to see Twain's concert in Nashville on Friday night. It seems like the concert was a bit therapeutic for Lambert, who recently split from Blake Shelton, as she hashtagged an Instagram post from the show "#musicismedicine." 



    Shania Twain. Fringe Saddle. That's All. #nashville #girlsnight #rockthiscountry #badass #musicismedicine

    A photo posted by Miranda Lambert (@mirandalambert) on



    Twain also shared a photo of the two women looking super cute together as they embraced in a hug: 



    Girls night, love seeing you! #RockThisCountry

    A photo posted by Shania Twain (@shaniatwain) on



    Here's to hoping they found a karaoke bar somewhere and belted out "That Don't Impress Me Much" together. Because that, my friends, is therapeutic. 


    Also on HuffPost:


    -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.












    0 0


    Snoop Dogg just can't seem to catch a break lately. 


    The rapper, who was arrested on suspicion of illegal drug use in Sweden last week, found himself in the middle of another dilemma while leaving Italy on Saturday. 


    A police source told CNN the rapper was found with $422,820 in U.S. cash during a normal check at Lamezia Terme, an airport in Calabria. However, passengers traveling through Italy are only legally allowed to carry 10,000 euros ($11,010) without declaring it. 


    When they found the money, Italian Finance Police seized $205,933, according to the source who spoke to CNN. 


    The cash was seized under Italian anti-money laundering codes, and should eventually be returned minus the cost of any fines, according to the Telegraph.


    The 43-year-old, who was in Italy for a performance in Montepaone, told police the excess cash was to pay his band for concerts in Italy and elsewhere, CNN reported. 


    "We clarified everything from a legal point of view," Snoop's lawyer, Andrea Parisi, said in a statement. "The money came from concerts he had performed around Europe. There was no crime; it was just an administrative infraction."


    The "So Many Pros" rapper is currently performing across the EU and is slated to stop in England next for the Kendal Calling festival.


    Also on HuffPost: 


    -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.












    0 0

    The Tanner sisters (and Kimmy Gibbler) are back together again!


    Candace Cameron Bure shared a photo on Instagram on Sunday showing her with "Fuller House" co-stars Andrea Barber (Gibbler) and Jodie Sweetin (Stephanie Tanner). Cameron Bure, who plays DJ Tanner in the series, captioned the pic, "Love these girls." We love them too. 



    The trio is set to return for the "Full House" revival series, which focuses on DJ as a widowed mother with another baby on the way. In the series, the oldest Tanner daughter enlists the help of BFF Kimmy and sister Stephanie after the death of her husband. 


    About a week ago, Cameron Bure posted another snap of Barber, in which she's making silly faces (as Kimmy would likely do).



    But Cameron Bure isn't the only cast member who's been teasing us with behind-the-scenes pics. Last week, John Stamos (Uncle Jesse) shared a slew of pics, including an adorable one of him running away from his TV wife, Lori Loughlin (Aunt Becky). 



    Running from birthday woman!! @loriloughlin

    A photo posted by John Stamos (@johnstamos) on



    Can the cast just cut it out already? We're getting way too antsy for this show! 


    Also on HuffPost:


    -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.












    0 0


    Ashlee Simpson and Evan Ross welcomed their baby girl on Thursday — with an appropriately rock-inspired name!


     

    -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.












    0 0

    Sunday is for swimming. 


    Kylie Jenner slipped into a black bikini Sunday for some pool time with sister Kourtney Kardashian. The 17-year-old, who is celebrating her 18th birthday next week at a beach club in Montreal, posted a selfie to Instagram taken in her bathroom mirror. 


    "Kourt & Ky swim session," she captioned the shot. 



    A photo posted by King Kylie (@kyliejenner) on



    Fans were quick to pay homage to the reality star's look. Later in the day, she shared a photo of some artwork done in her honor. 



    A photo posted by King Kylie (@kyliejenner) on




    For a constant stream of entertainment news and discussion, follow HuffPost Entertainment on Viber.

    -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.












    0 0

    Lucy Hale is fighting the villainous "A" on ABC Family's hit drama "Pretty Little Liars," but offscreen she's warning teens about a different villain entirely: meningococcal meningitis.


    The infection, which affects approximately 4,100 people per year in the United States, is a bacterial illness that results in inflammation of the membranes surrounding the brain and spinal chord. It's contagious, although not as contagious as viruses like the common cold, and usually is spread through an exchange like kissing or using the same eating utensils. The symptoms are somewhat similar to the flu, and typically include fever, vomiting and sometimes even a confused mental stateMeningitis can also be fatal.


    Hale is speaking out about the severity of the illness through a new PSA. She partnered with meningitis survivor Jamie Schanbaum for Boost the Volume, a campaign for the Voices of Meningitis organization. The initiative is designed to promote the benefits of the meningitis vaccine.


    The pair chatted with The Huffington Post about the campaign and what they want everyone to know about the potentially fatal infection.



    What inspired you to get involved with this project?


    Lucy Hale: I grew up sort of knowing how potentially dangerous and deadly meningitis could be. My mom was a nurse, so I grew up in a household where regular doctors' visits were important and vaccinations were important. 


    The Boost the Volume campaign is encouraging teens and parents to get the second vaccination for meningococcal meningitis. We challenged high school acapella groups to submit a medley of songs about living your best life and obviously encouraging people to get that vaccination. The musical aspect [of the campaign] and the fact that my mom is a nurse really drew me in. But also my whole fanbase and the majority of people who support me are teenagers and I care about their well-being. That's the age range where teens should be getting their second vaccination, which is around 16 years old.


    What's your advice for your young fans when it comes to taking care of themselves?


    LH: My advice to them -- and their parents -- is to just talk to their healthcare providers. Ask about vaccinations. For meningitis, the first vaccine is more well-known, but that vaccination wears off, so it's important that you get the second dose.


    What other lessons about health did you learn from your mom?


    LH: She taught me to just listen to my body and ask questions when something feels off. I was just lucky that she transferred her health knowledge to me.


    Jamie, can you tell me a little bit about your experience with meningitis? 


    Jamie Schanbaum: I was 20 years old when I got meningitis. The thing about the infection is that it can kill someone in 24 hours. I was lucky enough to be admitted to the hospital within 14 hours, but since I was unvaccinated I suffered scary consequences. Not only was I in the hospital for about seven months, I also had some amputations -- all of my fingers, basically, and my legs below the knee.


    What has your involvement in Voices of Meningitis meant for you emotionally?


    JS: To go through all of that and learn that it could have been prevented is this whole other situation you have to process and bear. I definitely turned myself around in order to make people aware of this disease because I didn't know anything about it. Now I just want to make sure people are educated which is why I am so proud to be part of this campaign. It's been empowering and educational. 


    What do you both wish people knew about meningitis?


    LH: It's extremely scary. It can potentially take the life of an otherwise healthy person in 24 hours or less. It's a deadly disease that can be prevented, so why not take care of it?


    JS: I was just a student, in college for the first time. I felt invincible and then so much was just taken away from this illness. But my life was definitely rebuilt and I was even able to end up on the U.S. Paralympic Cycling Team. A new leaf turned for me, but it didn't have to be this way. It's a passion of mine to make sure students are aware of this disease.


    This interview has been edited and condensed for clarity.

    Check out the Boost the Volume PSA below to learn more about the meningococcal meningitis vaccine:




     


    Also on HuffPost:


    -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.












    0 0


    There's this strange aspect of shipping couples on TV in which we actively root for relationships that emerge from cheating. Can a healthy bond ever really be forged from dishonesty? And why are we so willing to encourage it?


    There are a few instances of cheating on "UnREAL," the Lifetime drama which takes place behind the scenes of the (fictional) dating competition show, "Everlasting." (Spoiler alerts ahead!) For engaged cameraman Jeremy, hooking up with producer Rachel might be his only observable flaw. He is otherwise a sort of moral center on set, a counterpoint for the slimy practices behind actively manipulating contestants. And yet, that one "mistake" speaks to the entirety of his character: his selfishness, impulsivity and willingness to treat his fiancée as a placeholder bring his supposed goodness into question. 


    The Huffington Post spoke to actor Josh Kelly about playing Jeremy and how his role fits into the tricky set of ethics that rule the "UnREAL" universe.



    Jeremy is set up as such a "good guy." How do you think he allows himself to cheat? What kind of explanations do you think cheating required?


    He didn't really look at his fiancée Lizzie as who he wanted to be with. He looked at her as who he should be with and what he should be doing with his life. Then Rachel came in. It was a struggle, and then he finally hooks up with Rachel. But he feels bad about it. You know, people make mistakes. He's not perfect. But no one's perfect, you know?


    Do you think a successful, healthy relationship can stem from cheating? Could that ever be the case for Jeremy and Rachel?


    Even in life I feel like that happens a lot! You start with a bad situation and you never feel like it's based on honesty. As a whole, I think Jeremy feels like a lot of the people in the show. He feels like he doesn't really want to be a part of any of it. He doesn't want to do bad things.  


    That's interesting. A lot of the ethics of the show hinge on this perceived necessity, ranging from a need for a paycheck to the total lack of options for Rachel.


    None of the producers or the crew want to do bad things, but then again they still want to be a part of this process and this program. Jeremy wishes that he had the fortitude to cut it off, to leave and become a director of photography or a director of feature films, but he's swept up in this world. His excuse is Rachel and his excuse is his paycheck. 



    Rachel was drawn to Jeremy, but as soon as he responds to her advances she hooks up with (the "Everlasting" suitor) Adam. Is she just being destructive? What do you think is going on there?


    I think you're correct! It seems like she's being destructive. A lot of chaos happens in finding out who you are as a person and who you should be with. And a lot of time you end up hurting people, you end up hurting yourself, you make the wrong decisions first or before you make the right ones. Before you can make the right decisions you have to know that you've made the wrong ones. So, I feel like Rachel is exploring who she wants to be with and who she should be with. 


    How do you see Jeremy? Do you think of him at all as a moral center behind the scenes of "Everlasting"?


    Yes, he is. Some of the contestants are as well. But no one is innocent. It's just like in life, you know? I think Jeremy is relatable. That's important to have when some characters are just terrible. I also think it's really cool that he is a crew member. I've noticed from working that a lot of the crew members are some of the hardest-working, most awesome blue-collar guys. Still, it's important he has that flaw. No one is perfect.



    Do you watch reality TV? How do you think of it since working on "UnREAL"?


    I had never watched dating reality shows before. I have since and I find it fascinating. I enjoy watching them and seeing the parts that are produced. It adds another layer of entertainment for me. Some people really get into it, like, "How could she do that?" And I'm like, "She was produced." When you really start paying attention to the acting, you can tell when they're being produced or being made to say things. 


    Did you see that Chris Harrison commented on the way reality TV is presented on "The Bachelor" (and called it "really terrible")?


    Ha, I don't think I'm supposed to really comment on it. I'm flattered that he took notice of our show!


    A few weeks ago, "UnREAL" was renewed for a second season. Do you know if you'll be a part of that or if Jeremy will continue to be a part of Rachel's life? 


    I think I am! But you never know until a show comes out. I really try never to get my hopes up with a character. I mean, I look forward to the work, but it feels like any time I've gotten my hopes up about where someone is going or something happening, it doesn't turn out well. I hope he's going to be there. Were I a betting man, I'd bet on Jeremy being involved in Season 2.


    This interview has been edited and condensed for clarity.


    Also on HuffPost:



    For a constant stream of entertainment news and discussion, follow HuffPost Entertainment on Viber.

    -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.












    0 0

    Could Gisele Bündchen and her family be any more adorable? We think not. 


    The Brazilian supermodel posted a photo on Instagram Monday morning in which she's seen kissing husband Tom Brady in the water while their children are piggybacked on their shoulders. To make things even cuter, daughter Vivian Lake is kissing Brady's head, while little Benjamin kisses his sister's head. It's too much. 



    A photo posted by Gisele Bündchen (@gisele) on



    The world's highest-paid supermodel captioned the squee-worthy pic, "Happy birthday my love! We're so blessed to have you in our lives. Thank you for always giving us so much love. We love you! #love #family." 


    #EverythingGoals. 


    Also on HuffPost:



    For a constant stream of entertainment news and discussion, follow HuffPost Entertainment on Viber.

    -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.












    0 0

    2015-08-03-1438613389-8032078-CJ_HRC_Editorial5.png

    Caitlyn Jenner and friends visit HRC. From HRC: Alison Gill, Jay Brown, Laya Monarez, Angelica Ross, Blossom C. Brown; Caitlyn's friends: Jenny Boylan, Chandi Moore, Jen Richards, Candis Cayne


    This article is part of an on-going original series written by Caitlyn Jenner for WhoSay called "The Real Me," which explores issues and people in the LGBT community.

    Hi, friends. I hope your week is off to a great start. As always, thank you for your unending love and support. Every day, I'm humbled by the thousands of you who reach out to tell me your story, ask questions, or provide encouragement. Even though I can't respond to each of you individually, I want you to know that I appreciate your kind gestures more than I could ever express.

    To those of you who have asked me for my opinion or expertise, I want to remind you that while I've known that I was trans since I was a small child, learning about the trans community is still very new to me and I don't have all the answers. That said, the one constant I've noticed is how incredibly difficult it is for transgender folks to transition and become their authentic selves and still be healthy and secure -- emotionally, physically, financially...the list goes on and on.

    We have to make things easier for the transgender community, and my friends over at the Human Rights Campaign are fighting to do just that. For those of you who aren't familiar already, HRC is America's largest civil rights organization working to achieve lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender equality. The HRC is an incredible resource to the LGBT community and its allies.

    In fact, I asked some of the talented experts at HRC to help answer some of the questions you have sent me. I hope these insights from Alison Gil, Ellen Kahn, and Beck Bailey shed more light on the transgender community and make things easier for all of my friends out there. Stay strong! - Caitlyn

    --------

    Anna: I think my four-year-old son may be transgender and I have no one to talk to about it. His father is in complete denial and won't speak on the subject. Nobody believes me and just laughs. Do you have any advice?

    Trust your instincts, Anna, but also reach out to folks who are equipped to guide and support you. There are medical professionals who specialize in helping transgender children. If your child is transgender, obtaining a diagnosis from a medical professional may encourage others to understand what they are going through, and also help you get the support that you need. HRC has a resource that can point you to clinical-care programs for transgender and gender expansive children. You can find it here. -- Alison Gill, Senior Legislative Counsel at the Human Rights Campaign

    Carrie: I am a trans ally, with quite a few friends who are trans. My question is, how can us allies be....well...better allies? What sorts of things can we do in order to help our trans family and friends have a more positive experience and avoid some of the common issues faced in the community?

    Carrie -- thank you for being supportive! Strong trans allies talk openly about transgender issues and make a point of learning about transgender people and the issues they face in society. They are also vigilant about using appropriate names and pronouns for transgender people, and asking others to do so as well. Trans allies speak up when others make fun of transgender people, and they speak out in support of legislation and policy changes that help make transgender people safer and protect them from discrimination. HRC has a great resource on being a supportive ally to LGBT people -- read it here. -- Alison Gill, Senior Legislative Counsel at the Human Rights Campaign

    Tandi: My friend is a M to F transgender and was just denied medical coverage through her insurance here in Oregon. Do you have any suggestions or resources she can look into? What can she/I do?

    Hi, Tandi - Insurance providers that sell policies to businesses in Oregon are not allowed to offer plans that exclude transgender people. Your friend should appeal the insurance decision. Suggest that she enlist the help of her medical provider to navigate the system. She may also want to reach out to the Oregon Insurance Division to make a complaint, or seek help from an attorney to pursue a claim. -- Alison Gill, Senior Legislative Counsel at the Human Rights Campaign

    April: What would your recommendation be for people who want to transition but have no reasonable expectation of ever being able to fund it?

    Stay positive -- coverage for transition-related services for transgender people continues to expand across the country. More states are requiring that insurance providers offer transgender health care, and more businesses offer trans-inclusive benefits. This coverage will only increase as medical providers, insurance companies, and businesses continue to recognize that transition-related care is medically necessary for transgender people. Check out HRC's Corporate Equality Index to see which corporations offer inclusive benefits, and the Municipal Equality Index and State Equality Index, to see which cities and states have inclusive coverage for their employees. Good luck, April! -- Alison Gill, Senior Legislative Counsel at the Human Rights Campaign

    Cris: What is the best way to explain being transgender to children, particularly when it is someone who they know personally?

    Hi, Cris - I'd recommend that you keep it simple. If a child's friend is transgender and will be transitioning socially, say from Sam to Sarah, you can explain that Sam has always felt female. You can tell your child that Sam has known he's a girl, even though he was born in a boy body. And that Sam has been very unhappy as a boy, and now, as Sarah, she is able to be who she really is and she is so much happier, and that we are all very happy for her. -- Ellen Kahn, head of HRC Foundation's Children, Youth and Families Program

    Stephanie: I recently found my sister's tumblr account and it says how she is transgender. I don't know if I should tell my sister I know. How should I approach her?

    It would be best not to confront her about her tumblr. Instead, make clear to her in everyday conversations that you are an ally to transgender people. Let her know that you are there if she ever wants to talk about anything, and that you love and support her. Referencing "I Am Cait," or "I Am Jazz" may be a good way to start a conversation about transgender issues. Thank you for being a caring sister, Stephanie. -- Alison Gill, Senior Legislative Counsel at the Human Rights Campaign

    Livvie: I'm trans and I don't know how to come out. Help!

    Hi Livvie! We know this can be an exciting time when a person can feel proud, strong, uncertain and nervous all at the same time. Remember that everybody's circumstances are different and there's no one right way to 'come out,' just as there is no one 'right way' to be trans. First, work on finding community with other transgender folks -- the Internet can be a place to start, or a local LGBTQ organization that has resources for transgender people. If you live in a rural area, you may want to connect virtually.

    When you start telling people, first consider speaking confidentially to the most trusted people in your life. Let them know that you are telling them because you trust them and value their friendship and support. A lot of folks don't know very much about transgender people, so you might need to answer some questions for them about what it means to be trans.

    While there are benefits to coming out to people, there can also be serious risks and consequences. The decision is yours and yours alone. But we encourage you to weigh both risks and rewards before making a choice to tell others. HRC has a great guide for thinking through your coming out process. Check it out: Trans Visibility Guide. -- Beck Bailey, Deputy Director of Employee Engagement at the Human Rights Campaign Foundation



    For more information on the transgender movement, see a list of resources at CaitlynJenner.com.

    2015-07-06-1436196199-3552936-ScreenShot20150706at11.22.58AM.png

    -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.












    0 0

    Gigi Hadid, fashion's golden girl, is now a September issue cover star.  


    The 20-year-old model stuns on the highly anticipated issue of W magazine. Having previously covered Teen Vogue, this arguably marks her most monumental cover spot to date. 



    Sporting major hair and oozing glamour, Hadid is cited by the mag as a "model of the digital age" and "spectacularly connected" thanks not only to her 4 million Instagram followers, but also to her famous family (her mother Yolanda Foster is a former model and cast member of "Real Housewives of Beverly Hills," and her stepfather, award-winning music producer David Foster, was once married to Caitlyn Jenner's ex-wife, Linda Thompson.)


    Inside the glossy, Hadid talks about going nude, social media and the success of her career thus far, which she credits, in part, to a balance of high-end and mass market work. 



     


    "My Pirelli calendar is hanging on the wall of my friend’s frat house, and he doesn’t know anything about fashion. That balance is what leads to big campaigns outside of fashion. But I never want to choose one or the other. Both commercial and high fashion are what make my job so interesting," she said. 


    What makes her so interesting, on the other hand, is her ability to play to both the serious and goofy parts of her industry, as demonstrated by the video accompanying the shoot. Hadid pokes fun at herself and the intense "runway training" she's had.




     


    One thing Hadid is serious about, however, is when she feels comfortable posing nude. In fact, she says the decision to strip down for Tom Ford is what helped other high-fashion brands take her seriously. "I’ve never been scared of being naked in pictures, but I wouldn’t do naked for naked’s sake. With Tom, it was an easy decision. When you think of scent, you don’t think of clothes. ... When Tom liked me, other jobs followed," she said. 


    Be sure to pick up your copy of W Magazine, on newsstands Aug. 18. 



     


    Also on HuffPost Style:


    -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.












    0 0



    What do "Pulp Fiction," "Napoleon Dynamite," "The Breakfast Club" and 277 other movies have in common with Bruno Mars? One epic sing-along.


    YouTube user DonDraperSaysWhat decided to edit 280 movies together to the sound of Mark Ronson and Bruno Mars' "Uptown Funk." The video, which took three months to make, features everyone from Robert Downey Jr. and Arnold Schwarzenegger to Burt Reynolds and C-3PO singing about how uptown funk gon' give it to you. 


    Don't believe us? Just watch.


    Also on HuffPost:



    For a constant stream of entertainment news and discussion, follow HuffPost Entertainment on Viber.

    -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.












    0 0


    Zendaya Coleman made headlines earlier this year when she wrote a response to  E! host Giuliana Rancic's racist comments about the faux locs hairstyle she wore to the Oscars in February. 


     In an interview for Nylon this month, the 18-year-old singer and actress is once again dropping knowledge -- this time, she perfectly sums up the difference between appreciating a culture and appropriating it. 


    "You can go about it as cultural appreciation or cultural appropriation," Coleman explained. "You have to be very careful. Some things are really sacred and important to other cultures, so you have to be aware, politically, about those things before you just adopt them."


    The performer added that the key to appreciating a culture is to understand the history behind it. 


    "I’m someone who feels uncomfortable with things unless I know [about them]," she told Nylon. "I’m not going to try something unless I’ve taken the time and effort to learn about it. I just think with the Internet and the resources we have, you should do a little research."


    Several stars including Kylie Jenner and Miley Cyrus have sparked debates about cultural appropriation in the past year. Jenner was recently called out by Amandla Stenberg for wearing her hair in cornrows and dreadlocks -- traditionally African-American hairstyles. Her response to the criticism was largely dismissive, "Mad if I don’t, mad if I do..."


    But while her peers' actions have earned criticism, Coleman emphasizes that she does not  have all the answers. 


    "It’s a process for everyone and now with social media," she said. "I suggest that people try to become more aware and learn. I’m learning just like everybody else." 


    Also on The Huffington Post:


     


    -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.












    0 0


    Eminem's weight was up to 230 pounds when he overdosed on pills eight years ago. 


    "In 2007, I overdosed on pills, and I went into the hospital," the rapper told Men's Journal for the September 2015 issue of the magazine. "I was close to 230 pounds. I'm not sure how I got so big, but I have ideas. The coating on the Vicodin and the Valium I'd been taking for years leaves a hole in your stomach, so to avoid a stomachache, I was constantly eating -- and eating badly."



    Once clean, he changed his lifestyle. After dealing with difficulty sleeping, he picked up running, but got carried away because of his addictive mentality. Eminem would run 17 miles a day, burning as many as 2,000 calories, and dropped down to just 149 pounds. 


    "Unless I was blitzed out of my mind, I had trouble sleeping," he said. "So I started running. It gave me a natural endorphin high, but it also helped me sleep, so it was perfect. It's easy to understand how people replace addiction with exercise."


    He now does Shaun T's Insanity workout, P90X and Body Beast to stay healthy and mix up his regimen. 


    The 42-year-old almost died when he overdosed on methadone. 


    “Had I known it was methadone, I probably wouldn’t have taken it," he previously told Vibe. "But as bad as I was back then, I can’t even say 100 percent for sure. My doctor told me the amount of methadone I’d taken was equivalent to shooting up four bags of heroin. Even when they told me I almost died, it didn’t click.”



    For a constant stream of entertainment news and discussion, follow HuffPost Entertainment on Viber.

    -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.












    0 0

    In a 52-minute interview on July 31, Bill Cosby's lawyer Monique Pressley continuously dismissed the more than 40 women who have come forward with allegations against 78-year-old.  "Either you get your day in court or you move on," Pressley told HuffPost Live host Marc Lamont-Hill.


    Pressley is media-trained; she's poised and she deftly side-stepped Lamont-Hill's most damning questions. But her (sanitized, well-planned) comments offered chilling insight into the way rape culture works. They also brought into sharp relief our collective desire to assume the worst of women who "tarnish" the image of our cultural heroes. 


    In light of her comments, here are five things we need to clear up:


    The court of law is not the same as the court of public opinion.



    2015-08-03-1438615461-1951287-150731_a04_ny_lawyer_gif_01.gif

    "I believe that people are innocent until they're proven guilty. And if you can't prove them guilty in court through prosecution, then you don't get the option of persecution instead," said Pressley.


    Bill Cosby will most likely never see the inside of a jail cell -- and the public has no power to circumvent his liberty with opinions. But we, the public, get to make judgments based on the plethora of information we have at our disposal. 


    When more than 40 women come forward with stories that are consistent, in a society that systematically shames victims of sexual abuse, it is our right as private citizens to operate on the assumption that their words do have credibility -- at least as much credibility as his.


    The New Inquiry's Aaron Bady wrote about the refrain of "innocent until proven guilty" as it relates to sexual assault cases and the court of public opinion. His words, pegged to accusations made against Woody Allen, hold true for Cosby as well: "His presumption of innocence can only be built on the presumption that her words have no credibility." Saying Cosby isn't a liar implies that all of the women who have made accusations against him are.


    There are real reasons that women come forward decades after a sexual assault occurs.


    Fear of retribution, fear of not being believed, fear of having to continuously relive a trauma, to name a few. 


    Pressley took issue that Cosby's alleged victims were coming forward "10, 20, 30, 40 years later." She also expressed skepticism about why, if their claims were real, they wouldn't speak out right after the incidents occurred: "There's not any testimony or any accusation from any of these women that Mr. Cosby bound them, gagged them, prevented them from coming forward and saying whatever their truth was at the time," she told Lamont-Hill.


    But when you consider the emotional trauma and scrutiny women often face when they come forward and the difficulty of proving definitively that an assault took place, is it really all that surprising these women stayed silent until their voices reached a critical mass? Plus, as Cosby accuser Therese Serignese told me in November, in the '60s and '70s, date rape "wasn't even a word,"


    There are no "benefits" to making up a false allegation of assault.  



    2015-08-03-1438615566-9672518-150731_a04_ny_lawyer_gif_02.gif

    "They earn themselves a seat in a chair on the front of a magazine. They get interviewed over and over," said Pressley -- as though the promise of "fame" could explain why dozens of women came forward to recall painful, violating memories in a public forum. When people dream of "fame," does anyone really think that being  (in)famous as a victim of sexual assault is the goal?


    Spoiler alert: Going public with a sexual assault accusation isn't super fun! For the vast majority of victims who come forward, the only real incentive is the vague promise of potential "justice." And when you are accusing a powerful public figure of sexual assault -- especially one who has served as a cultural "father figure" for millions of Americans -- you can bet that you'll also be facing online harassment and the disbelief of people who can't conceive that their hero could also being a rapist.


    Sometimes, victims maintain cordial -- or even friendly -- relationships with the person who has sexually assaulted them. That does not act as evidence that the assault didn't occur.


    During the HuffPost Live interview, Pressley reminded Lamont-Hill that Beverly Johnson's former manager claimed that the model fabricated her claims against Cosby. "That's a prime example of a situation where a longtime manager of Ms. Johnson came forward to various media outlets and said, 'Hmm, I was around during the time of this action and Ms. Johnson had nothing but positive things to say about Bill and Camille Cosby,'" she said. 


    But the truth is that victims react to sexual assault in a variety of ways, and health professionals stress that there is no "correct" reaction. We often look for "perfect victims" to bolster narratives of assault -- women who react in the "right" way, do the "right" thing afterwards, have the "right" evidence. In reality, "perfect victims" don't exist. 


    Victim-blaming is alive and well.



    2015-08-03-1438616659-2955923-150731_a04_ny_lawyer_gif_05.gif

    Pressley said the term victim-blaming is just "a hashtag" that exemplifies "the prevailing way that we label things." Her comments prove just how easy it is to craft a narrative where victims are at fault for what happened to them.


    "Women have responsibility. We have responsibility for our bodies, we have responsibility for our decisions. We have responsibility for the way we conduct ourselves," said Pressley.


    Later, she asked: "How many women and men have been willing to offer up their bodies on a casting couch? Have been willing to exchange sex for favors? Have had remorse after doing so and then accused someone who they believed they could get monetary gain out of and sell a story?"


    These "many women and men" Pressley references seem more like figments of imagination created by a culture that tries its very hardest not to believe the stories of victims of sexual assault, than archetypes rooted in truth.


    Here is the truth: Rape is severely underreported in the United States, which means that victims are far, far, far more likely to bury an incident and suffer silently than they are to speak out about it. Hollywood has a long, storied history of "male scumbags," who have used their privileged positions to exploit less powerful women.


    "What I am doing is asking people to focus on facts," said Pressley. Looking at the facts, I'm inclined to think that Cosby isn't some miraculous exception -- he's the rule.


    Head over to HuffPost Live to watch the full interview with Pressley.


    -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.












older | 1 | .... | 716 | 717 | (Page 718) | 719 | 720 | .... | 764 | newer